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Interview with Aleix Gordo Hostaua

Interview with Aleix Gordo Hostau

Barcelona was the main stage for many street artists to shine on the last decade on europe. Aleix Gordo Hostau was part of this group of talented spanish artists that emerged. Besides his street work, Aleix is multidisciplinary illustrator with a great taste for graphic design, today we have the pleasure to show this interview we did recently with him. You can see more from Aleix on the following links: Website Flickr Behance Twitter Vimeo Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and street art started? First of all thanks to you guys for the interview, the honor is mine. I started to draw when I was months old. There was tradition on drawing in the family so my grandmother put a pencil in my hand when I still was in my high chair... I haven’t stopped since then. I started earning money from drawing when I still was at high school. Back then I never thought that being an illustrator was a profession so I studied History in the University. When I was 25-26 I started having a lot of work as an illustrator so I quit the University and became a full time artist. Street art was different... I always was surrounded by graffiti writers when I was at high school (some of them where famous in the city) but I was practicing martial arts in a high level so I hadn’t time for that. Barcelona was a hot spot on graffiti in late 90’s, it was impossible not to see graffiti on the walls because it literally was covering the whole city. At that time my brother-in-law was a graffiti writer too so I started drawing characters as graffiti writers in my blackbooks... A few later I decided to create the first comic about graffiti in Spain. I wanted it to be realistic so I decided to contact as many artists as possible from the graffiti scene asking to collaborate with their work in the walls that appeared in my comic boxes. I contacted 32 for the first issue. I made a lot of good friends and they invited me to paint with them once... and I got addicted. It’s probably the weirdest way to get into street art I’ve heard so far... hahaha. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? That is a really difficult question... I have hundreds of them. I’ll try to make a summary. James Jean, Katsuhiro Otomo, Jamie Hewlett, Akira Toriyama, Moebius, Sergio Toppi, Mike Mignola, Kim Jung Gi... In the street art world would be Aryz, San, Sainer,... Mural Painting - Hotel Vincci Bit Barcelona - Aleix Gordo Hostau from Aleix Gordo Hostau on Vimeo. 3) Your style is quite influenced by graffiti culture and comics. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? Well, when I started painting canvases for fun when I was 19, I was very influenced by Japanese old engravings from the XIX century (the Ukiyo-e, a style with clear lines and flat colors). I applied some of that in my early comics and street art pieces... but time passed by. I changed my style (or developed it) twice in between what I do now and those clear-lined works I used to do. I think Moebius, Sergio Toppi, Aryz and lowbrowers had influenced me a lot since then. My style now is not that clear-lined, it focuses more on strokes to give volumes and depth and, in all of its facets, is more colorful. When I did my first comic one of my problems was (or I though it was) that all the characters seemed to be really stiff, without any movement. They didn’t have a flow. So I got obsessed on giving my works a sense of movement. I think I partly mended some of that… 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I always begin with a pencil and a piece of paper no matter what will come next. What comes next really depends if there’s a client or not. If it’s a wall and there’s a client I take measurements, I make a sketch with an appropriate scale, and I try to transport the sketch into a final work on the wall. If it’s an illustration it works more or less the same. I draw a sketch and if the client likes it I make the final art (vectorizing it, painting it in acrylic, watercolor or color pencils, scan it and photoshop it or directly colored with Photoshop with my Wacom tablet.). If it’s a personal work, everything is not that formal, I can avoid or add some steps in between… depending on my time. 5) What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now? My family knew Marino Casas for a long time. He is one of the best interior designers in the fashion business in the world. I had his cell phone number and I started to call him once or twice every month to convince him to come to my studio (at that time settled at my mother’s garage). I did that for two years. One day I received a call from him saying: “Hey, are you in your studio? I’m just around the corner...”. I panicked, he came by, he liked my stuff but that was it. Only one month after that I had my first solo exhibition in a beautiful space that the government of my city has to promote young artists (I got selected to exhibit there). I invited him and, miraculously, he also came by. A month after that he called me and said: “I have a job for you.”. The job was to decorate with my drawings all Pepe Jeans London’s stands in the biggest fashion fairs all around the world. I was only 25-26. My life changed, I became full time illustrator and I had to begin to pay taxes...hahaha. Apart from that time, when everything seriously started, I consider the last two years the best moment in my career. By the time being, and the crisis we are having in Spain, I can’t complain. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? I wake up, have my breakfast, go to the gym, answer all my lost calls, mails and social network interactions. Have lunch and go to the studio. Work for six-seven hours and back home to have supper. Rest for a sec and work for another four-five hours. Read newspaper or books. Sleep and dream of electric sheeps… 7) Being a multimedia artist, please tell us what's your favorite media to work with?Why? Definitely pencil on paper, but I love Illustrator and spray cans. It really depends on my mood or if I feel like I want to make something more physical (painting a mural is very tiresome and I’m getting old!!;-)). I’ve been drawing on paper all my life so I take it as breathing or blinking. The scale it has and the immediacy of the tool helps to perform everywhere I go, that’s why I like it so much. It’s the minimum kit you need to draw. The other two media requires more resources and proper spaces like a computer or a big bag full of spray cans and a big wall (normally out of town). 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. I’ll give you ten: Work. Work. Work. Work. Show your work to the world. Pray to any God. Hire an accountant. Work. Work. Work. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. - Image and Comics (FB) - Behance - Ekosystem - Montana Colors Blog - Colossal 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. I fortunately know really important artists from a lot of different disciplines and none of them succeeded without having a period of time in their lives where they were enclosed working on their stuff like junkies. Unless you’re a super-genius and have the proper contacts or a “four-leaf clover” luck, there’s no other way to do it. Sorry for being a little bit too rough but, if you don’t really know if drawing, illustrating, painting or whatever… is not your real thing, better quit and invest your time on something more profitable. Above anything else, enjoy what you do!

Interview with Simon Stâlenhag

Interview with Simon Stâlenhag

Concept art is a highly requested media today, not only for movies, books, comics and animations, but mainly for the videogame industry. Simon Stalenhag is a Swedish illustrator and concept artist with an outstanding talent for this craft, he already worked on the game concept of Ripple Dot Zero and other videogame titles. Recently we had this awesome conversation with him and Simon told us more about his life, career and insights. You can see more from Simon on the following links: Website Twitter Red Bubble Tumblr 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and art started? I started drawing as a little kid. My grandfather on my mother's side was an advertising illustrator and he was very encouraging. He had all this special office supplies that he let me use as much as I wanted to. So to be more specific - somewhere around the year 1988, when I was four years old and regularly started to hang out in my grandfathers home office. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? Traditional wildlife and landscape artists like Bruno Liljefors, Anders Zorn and Lars Jonsson. Many russian landscape painters aswell. And for mechanical designs and vehicles I'm very inspired by artists like Syd Mead and Ralph Mcquarrie, but I'm in great debt to contemporary concept artists like Ian Mcque, Scott Robertson and Ryan Church. 3) Your style is quite influenced by science fiction and realism. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I started drawing and painting birds when I was a kid. I was a very outdoors oriented child. My family lived out on the country outside of Stockholm, we had a summerhouse and went camping on holidays. So I had this landscape painter inside me since age 8 basically. Then in my early twenties I really got interested in science fiction and that kind of design. I discovered the likes of Syd Mead and Ralph Mcquarries and developed a passion for mechanical and vehicle design, although I never dared to try it out myself. I just admired it from a distance. It's the same with the dinosaurs. I always had a big passion for natural history and dinosaurs in particular but I neved had the guts to draw them. Too hard. But then I finally took a deep breath and started to practice that kind of drawing. So two years ago I combined these these different artistic passions - the landscapes, the dinosaurs and the sci fi into what is the art on simonstalenhag.se. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I take tonnes of photos. I always carry my camera around and my photo library stretches back to 2002 and contains over 40 000 photos. Sometimes I start from a blank document and just work my way up to a finished painting but most of the time I start by going through my photo archive. When I find a photo I like a start playing around with it. I remove elements that I don't like and add stuff onto the picture. I really treat it like clay. This is also when I lay out the basic mechanical design or architectural design. When I have a sketch that I like I start over from scratch. I create a simple palette from that sketch and starts to build up a detailed version of the sketch, layer by layer, much like I would in a traditional medium, like gouache. This is when I start over and carefully treat that sketch as a reference for a high res render. I try to avoid digital effects like filters and gradients and do everything with brush strokes like this: 5) You've created a whole new and fascinating universe thru your paintings that we can see on the first page of your website, please tell us more about it and how you came with all this ideas. It's a kind of extrapolation of the time and place I grew up in. I grew up in the late 80's, early 90's Sweden, just in the beginning of the modern era of intense privatization and deconstruction of the welfare state. But we still had big state agencies running electricity, telecommunications and television. There was a sense of altruistic use of technology back then, not the kind of consumer driven gadget craze of today. In my paintings I just extrapolated that into this huge government run research project that permeates every part of the society where the paintings take place. It's some kind of very experimental research facility deep underground. Unexpected side effects occur. Dinosaurs roam the landscape. Something like that... 6) How do you describe your daily routine? This is my office. It's a cabin I rent outside of stockholm in the same area as I grew up in as a kid actually. I go up early in the morning, around 7:am. I go out for a walk and then have my breakfast at 8. I like to begin work no later than 9, or I get anxious and restless. I use to take a big break sometime during the afternoon when I go out for a long walk again. When I get back I continue work for a couple of hours. My girlfriend is a musician so when she's out playing I usually don't stop work until 8 or 9 in the evening. But if she's at home we try to spend some time together. Since both of us are involved in creative lines of work with often very odd hours, we really have to schedule in our time together. It's hard sometimes. 7) Being a multimedia artist, please tell us what's your favorite media to work with? Why? I actually love ink and pencil. I don't get to use it very much in the final work that I do. Sitting by the computer and staring into a monitor get's tedious and uncomfortable after a while. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. 1. Be aware of your visual economy - don't waste effort on details that doesn't help the illustration - every detail that is added should, like a good line of argument, improve the clarity in what you're trying to say. I fail at this every time. 2. Think before you draw. Knowing what you are trying to say before putting the pencil to the paper is crucial. Even if it's only a quick sketch. 3. Don't look too much on what other people are doing - look at HOW they do it, and perhaps WHY they do it could be also be interesting, but somewhere you have to step in and add something new to the world. 4. Have other influences than other illustrators. Please. There are books, music, poetry, architecture, theater, film, typography, history, science, pottery and knitting. To name a few other areas where you just might find that crucial piece of inspiration. 5. Be open to criticism but be careful. The importance of this property has been blown out of proportion by job postings in the entertainment industry. They call it feedback and iterative work process but that's been borrowed from the world of software development and it's not necessarily the path to novelty. Of course criticism is useful when dealing with basic skills of the craft. But if you have an idea, no matter if it's about technique or subject, that resonates with you - to hell with what everybody else thinks. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. 1. Wikipedia. Just think about what it is. 2. Newscientist.com. This is also a daily visit for me. 3. The Conceptrobots and conceptships blog. Once you've started scrolling you can't stop. 4. Conceptart.org - This place taught me how to paint digital. Huge forum with tonnes of help for the beginners. 5. ffffound.com - the simple randomness of it appeals to me. 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Take your own ideas seriously and set aside time to realize them. Be careful to not spend your time being a photoshop cursor for other peoples ideas.

Interview with Glennz

Interview with Glennz

Anyone into t-shirt culture already saw or have a Glennz t-shirt, probably because he's a legend on this niche, a truly godfather of the tee design. Over the last decade, Glenn made a huge following with his comic, sarcastic and funny designs and now we had the pleasure to now more about this awesome illustrator. You can see more from Glennz on the following links: Website Behance Tumblr Twitter Facebook Dribbble Vimeo Flickr 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and graphic design started? I've always enjoyed drawing so from very early on I had decided I wanted some kind of career in the creative field. Graphic design and illustration was just a natural progression for me. 2) Which designers do you use as reference? None really, I think my style just developed from doing a lot of pictorial graphics and infographics early in my design career. I've always had an interest in mechanical and instructional drawings and the clean simple graphics achieved with vector illustration. 3) Your style is quite influenced by pop culture and old school designs. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? It started when I was submitting designs to Threadless. I found by putting my own spin on pop culture, that seemed to resonate with the community on Threadless, so I just continued down that track of pop culture/ humorous designs. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. It's fairly simple. I often come across an object or subject as a starting point, then try to think of ways to put a fresh spin on that. I often leave or forget about it for awhile then it will just pop back into my head and I'll go ahead and draw it. I draw everything in Adobe Illustrator. I have a pretty good picture in my head of how I want it to look, so I draw a quick rough on screen first, convert that to guides then draw the final on top of that. Glennz Illustration Process - Empty Cartridge from Glenn Jones on Vimeo. My drawing process for my Glennz Tees shirt designs, I use the pen tool in Adobe Illustrator and draw with a Wacom tablet. If needed, I draw a quick rough on screen first, then convert that to guides to draw my final illustration on top of that. Start to finish 79 mins compressed into 3. Vote for this concept here http://concepts.glennz.com/ 5)What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now? Leaving my graphic design career to focus on what I wanted to do more (illustration and Tshirt design). Less stress. more fun. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Spend some time with my family, go through inbox, work on Glennz Tees business, then try to come up with some design ideas. Ideas aren't always that easy to come up with so I just try to do something totally different. Out for a coffee, exercise, freelance work. depends on whats happening at the time. 7) Being a multimedia artist, please tell us what's your favorite media to work with? Why? Adobe illustrator vector graphics have always been my preferred. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. 1. Keep drawing, it makes you better 2. Look at what other illustrators are doing, its inspiring and you can learn a lot 3. If you illustrate for a job, make sure you have have a creative release that allows you to work on stuff you want to draw rather than have to draw. 4. Embrace the internet. Your portfolio now has a world audience through sites like behance, dribbble etc. 5. Enjoy what you do 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. http://www.thisiscolossal.com http://www.swiss-miss.com http://www.core77.com http://www.notcot.org http://dribbble.com 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Just give it a go and make mistakes, you learn from those and you'll be better for it. Enjoy the ride. Thanks!

Interview with GR170

Interview with GR170

Interview with GR170 Abduzeedo is a creative reference website and we are proud to present artists, designers and other creatives from all areas you can imagine. Today we're glad to present this interview with the muralist GR170, one of the spanish members of the Mixed Media collective. You can see more from GR170 on the following links: Website Flickr Facebook First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for graffiti and street art? Thank you for the support it's always nice to have good feedback and sorry for my english... My friends and I started painting graffiti in the Barcelona’s boom of the 2000th, the streets of the city were full of murals and big graffiti pieces, people come all over the world to paint, we wanted to be part of it but we're away from the city center and at that time we're just learning. It was just about having fun and trying to spray cool things as the big boys in the neighborhood. GR170 earlier artwork. Which artists do you use as reference? Nowadays with all the internet information overdose it's too easy to get lots of references, I try not to abuse of this because it can be dangerous. Usually I like easy and clear things, I like people without a great technique and that have his own resources to explain something. The most important influence is my friends around me, the motivation during the paintings it's the biggest support. Painting alone is pretty much boring and harder… Your style is quite influenced by cartoons and childish illustration. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I don’t know how to describe my style, I just do what I feel to do. I cannot do anything else, that is what comes out of my head. Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. First of all you have to find a nice spot, we spend a lot of time searching for new walls, abandoned factories, highway bridges or any place the police can’t disturb you. I used to recycle a lot of plastic or latex paint, so when I find a good wall I would have enough paint to do it all over. I look into my skechbook and try to adapt the idea into the spot. After this, it's just painting for some hours and take a photo. What's the best thing about working with Street Art and what is the worst? I'm not sure about doing Street art, I don’t feel confortable with the street art label, I prefer to say I'm doing murals. I'm aware that my murals are not graffiti. But I feel near to the graffiti movement, have good friends that are writer and I like to write my name in the walls too. I have a lot of respect for the lettering and for the graffiti culture. But I'm not an orthodox and graffiti started in 1970 decade so the evolution of the tecniques and concepts are inevitable. So for me the worst thing are the people, galleries or artists taking advantage of the street painting. The best thing is the people I meet all these years. It's really nice to know and to paint near people you used to admire! How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have any hobbies? From monday to friday I use to wake up with my girlfriend alarm clock, take a walk in the park with the dog, draw something or work in the computer. In the weekend I try to paint as much I can, this is like a religion to me… We've seen a boom on street art and graffiti on the last 5 years, tells us your opinion about it. Obviously something is happening, lots of big walls festivals, graffiti blogs all over the web, street artists selling for millions. I guess in a few years we will see what will stay and what go on. Time will tell. Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every artist. Just some words: Know, work, overcome, resist and never give up! Tell us five websites that you like to visit www.weedandfun.com all-9-long.blogspot.com.es/ www.finerats.com maximumclatellot.blogspot.com.es/ facebook.com/internationalriot/ Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Just do what you want and have fun! Thanks again to you for the support!

Interview with Joseph William

Interview with Joseph William

Abduzeedo is really proud to bring always fresh and exclusive content to our readers, including exclusive interviews with emerging talents of the creative world. Today we interviewed Joseph William, a skillfull illustrator and designer from London, England that's beginning as a fulltime freelance illustrator. You can see more from Joseph on the following links: Website Behance Tumblr Twitter Shop 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for art and illustration? Not a problem, thanks for the interest! I guess Art and Design were the only things I was really interested in when I was at school, I didn't pay much attention in my other classes, I did just enough to get by. But as soon as I realised that people actually made art for a living, that became my immediate goal. Around the same time I got into music and playing in bands and then I inevitably started to make small commissions by doing artwork for posters/cds/t-shirts etc. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? I try not to use any artists as reference exactly, but I do follow a lot of different illustrators, I think the only thing they all have in common is a unique style thats instantly recognisable as their own, something I would say I'm still working on, but it only comes with the more work you produce. Illustrators I admire for their unique style are Patrick Leger, Evan Hecox, Hannah Stouffer, Josh Cochran, Teagan White, David Foldvari and a theres a few more I've bookmarked too. 3) Your style is quite influenced by realism. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? Definitely, I tend to use a lot of photographic reference in my images, but I like to skew the imagery sometimes to create what is a very unlikely or impossible scenario, I think doing this when the figures look so real creates quite a striking image. I've been working in the same way for years, just constantly developing and tweaking it to create a stronger final image. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I start off with lots of sketching on layout paper and overlapping different sketches to get a final composition, when I'm happy with the composition I re-sketch all the components on to one final piece of paper, I then clip the finished pencil underneath a piece of bristol board and start inking, I'll use a few different water colour brushes and black ink. When I'm happy with the final inked work I'll scan this in and start colouring with a tablet in photoshop. I'll then use homemade textures to finish it off. 5)What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now and what would be the worst one? Please share with us more about your path. Although I've been doing this kind of work on and off for the past 5 years or so, its only really in the last few months things have really taken off. I left my full time job managing cafes last year to concentrate on doing this work and I only got my website up at the end of March. So the highlight so far is the positive response I've had from my website. The worst moment for me was when I used to work in the cafe and I had to constantly turn down artwork jobs as my day job was taking too much of my time, hence why I decided to concentrate on this kind of work instead and it is so much more rewarding. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? My daily routine varies depending on if I have any commissions on or not as I'll spend a lot of time on commissions and the routine goes out the window. If I haven't got any active commissions the day usually starts with searching through my favourite sites, I go out for a walk and get something to eat before I start working on something new. I'm not the best at trying to promote myself but I'm getting better, and I'm making weekly blog updates mandatory. 7) What's your favorite media to work with and why? I love the crisp yet expressive lines of ink and brush, something I'm trying to do more of and scaling the palette back. I've also been experimenting with trying to paint separate layers and scan everything in separately to get more natural textures. I much prefer being hands on and doing things on a surface as apposed to digital, this is something I want to explore more in the future. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. 1. Keep going. You only get better the more you do, its not going to be a matter of weeks or months it will take years to be the best you can be. I'm still learning and I'm still pushing myself to make each piece better than the last. 2. Be your own worst critic. Judge each piece of work as critically as you can. Could it be better? Could the colours work better? Could it be bolder or more memorable? These are all questions I ask myself. I've completely redrawn whole images that took almost a day in a slightly different composition because I wasn't happy with it. 3.Don't quit your day job. Well don't quit your day job until you're ready. Part time jobs are incredibly useful to subsidise your income when you're starting out. Unfortunately you're not going to get millions of commissions as soon as you put your website up, theres going to be a lot of emailing people for quite a few months, even when you do get commissions they might not see the light of day for a couple of months. 4. Don't use every trick you have. Don't throw everything you have at an image just because you can, this will probably make the image look far too busy and very forgettable. Instead pick the process that you know will work well for the composition and keep it simple. 5. Try to change things up. Obviously don't completely change styles between each piece, but try changing the way you do things, keep a few things regular, that could be described as your style but experiment, otherwise this job could be the same as any other job, and thats not good. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. It's Nice That - This is great and its been on my bookmarks bar for quite a few years now, they consistently put out great content on a beautifully simple website. Boooooooom! - Jeff Hamada has been doing this for years too. More great content seen by millions. FFFOUND! - fantastic images updated daily and you can end up clicking through these for hours. Supersonic Electronic - More really good stuff, usually more illustration based too. Beautiful/Decay - Some more great work, usually more fine art based, but this site has really improved over the years and tends to show work that the other sites don't. 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Take your time. Don't rush an image or your day for that matter. You'll be far happier with everything you do if you take your time.

Interview with Mateusz Witczak

Interview with Mateusz Witczak

I really love to see such young designers as Mateusz Witczak, a extremely talented typographer from Warsaw, Poland. You don't need to see more than one of his artworks to understand his passion and love for type design. We had the opportunity to know more about him and his ideas, just check it. You can see more from Mateusz on the following links: Website Behance Facebook Tumblr Dribbble 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for typography and lettering? I also would like thank you for interviewing me and for appreciating my work. I started drawing when I was very young, my first passion was graffiti. But some time ago I just got less interested on this style and since 2012 I started creating lettering works. I became more popular when I shared some projects on Behance. Well, but this is just the beginning, I have only years old and lot to learn. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? Nowadays we have many great artists around the world. I often look for portfolio websites to find some inspirational artworks and artists. Also, music is a very important thing to me on the creative process, I like alternative and underground music, not really into worldwide famous rap or rock artists. is quiet and calm. 3) Your style is quite influenced by classic typography. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I love classic typography styles and I try to modify it for some custom scripts for each project. How I develop it? It's just hardwork, I only try to do it the best I can. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I always start doing some small and quick sketches on paper, on this step I try to create layouts of my ideas for the projects. Sometimes the project looks good from the first sketches, sometimes I must try to do some more sketches to choose the best layout. Then, I develop the project on a bigger scale, I finish the drawing using pencil or pigma ink pens. In the end, I scan it and put it on graphic apps. 5)What's would you consider the best moment day-to-day and what would be the worst one? The best moments is when I create something that satisfy me and the client. Another moment is when I see that I became better in what I do. I am a bit traditional, so the worst thing is when spend too much time looking to a computer screen, it's very time consuming and technical, not finest like drawing on paper. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? I'm working everyday because my work is my passion, but everyday is different, there's always a new project. Motivation and creative thinking makes every day interesting. Resting is also very important for me, often I go out to ride my bike, read some books, watch some movies. 7) What's your favorite media to work with and why? I try to be very precise, so I like pigma ink pens and automatic pencils with thin point. Then is really up to my own expectations, being ok with this every tool what I used is good for me. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every designer. - Be motivated; - Watch and learn; - Be inspired by the best creatives; - Make and develop your own style; - And always ttry to do the best you can. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. - Behance - Dribbble - Society6 - Typeverything - Creativytea 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Keep going!

Interview with Gwer aka. Rutger Paulusse

Today we present this interview with the typography dutch master Gwer also known as Rutger Paulusse. We had a great talk about subjects as carrer, expectations, influences and life, hope you appreciate it. You can see more from Rutger on the following links: Website Twitter Instagram Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for graphic design and typography? You're welcome, thanks for having me! :) Basically my interest for typography started when I started skateboarding and was hanging around in the park. One of the older skateboarders was into graffiti and started teaching the new kids the basics of graffiti. He explained the anatomy of letters and the technique of how to use a spray can. I started drawing letters and that never stopped. While studying event-management about 5 years later, I found out that I enjoyed the design work more as the actual management. I was more interested in designing the logos for the events and the artwork for the posters. Someone told me I could go to art-school, that really never occurred to me before, haha. Unfortunately I was denied at art school, but after a year of trying to build a portfolio I finally got in. It was an interesting year, I even did a painting course with some housewives, just to be able to create different kinds of work. At art school I really started to get interested in graphic design and illustration, and the more I saw, the more I got into it. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? There is so much inspiration and good work done these days. I love the people that are really into one style, its awesome to see how they can take one thing and practice and research one style in such a way that it gets very refined and developed. I love the brush-lettering style of Joluvian and Sergey Shapiro, the more authentic calligraphy from Shoe and the work of Ged Palmer. I also love the work of Jordan Metcalf, Like Minded Studio, Luke Lucas, Seb Lester, Ken Barber and I can keep going shouting out names like that. Some less obvious artists I like are 86era and some talent here in the Netherlands such as Bart Vollebregt and Vincent de Boer. Also Attak, a studio form the Netherlands, keeps dropping great type work. I also love the typographic CGI work from Chris Labrooy, Serial Cut and OnRepeat, that keeps inspiring me. 3) Your style is quite influenced by classic typography. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I was always drawing a lot, so that is basically the most important aspect for how stuff developed. LaterI started to practice the craft of calligraphy, which helped me to develop my style more. I think the path my type work took is kind of weird, but hey, whatever works. I started just drawing letters, later I started to design vector type stuff, and later, after many years I started to practice authentic calligraphy but also more illustrated type. The classic typography probably just was always something I loved to see, so it gets in your system. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I always start with pencil or pen and ink, I think the sketching part is important to get your proportions and base right. It's also good to get to know your shapes and how stuff could flow. Sketching is vey intuitive, so that helps with the kick-off of a project. After that first step I scan, maybe tweak, print and keep going until I feel the base is right. Than I take it to the computer and continue the process. I really like the part on the computer as well, you can easily try different things and see what that does for the design. Like Eames said: 'The details are not the details, they make the design' and the computer is a perfect tool to try out different details quick and easy. For the Typejunkies Anonymous logo I started with pen and ink to get the first proportions right,. On top of that sketch I started sketching out the letters and decided on the flow and dynamics. When I was happy with the base, I blew the whole thing up to decide on how the letters should look; how do the ends of the stem look, how do the descenders look and all that. Than it's time to start to vectorize it. As you can see a lot of important decisions are made during the part in Illustrator, I even decided to make the whole thing horizontal again, instead of slanted as you can see in the final. That last choice was a functional one, while mocking-up the work-in-progress in different situations and applications I found out the crooked version wasn't very convenient in use. 5)What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now and what would be the worst one? Going to intern and work in New York was very good, I worked with so many talented people; I learned so much. But also the decision afterwards to go back to Amsterdam to focus again on typography was a good one. I guess there are no real bad moments in the path you take, you need to develop, and even sometimes something feels like a bad moment, afterwards you see the lesson in it. So even if stuff seems bad, it was probably very valuable for you anyways. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? When I leave my house around 9 in the morning it's a 10 minute drive on my noisy bike to the studio. Having a noisy bike really helps in Amsterdam, people (read: tourists) hear you coming, so that frees your way. I usually stay at the studio until 8 in the evening. I don't have a pattern or routine at the studio, I do what needs to be done. From emailing clients and sending portfolios to sketching and designing to playing fuss ball. 7) What's your favorite artwork till this date and why? That is one hell of a question. It's unfair to ask that a designer, hahaha. Well, there is so much stuff I like in different categories, but I think Wim Crouwel's New Alphabet comes close to an all time favourite. It dates from 1967 and is an experimental typeface, way ahead of it's time. I guess it got me interested in graphic and type design. I mean look at it, 1967, what kind of hero you are, if you pull that off! 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every designer. 1. Kill your idols. Let stuff you really love go if it makes the whole thing better. 2. You get asked for what you do. Even if you don't show it, the universe will give you the stuff you put energy in, if you like it or not. 3. Enjoy what you do. If you don't like it, find something you like. So simple, but so true. 4. Presentation is 'everything'. You can make amazing work look like a piece of shit by not presenting properly. 5. Have goals and dreams, but evaluate them once every while. Also evaluate if what you are doing at that very moment, is supporting what you believe in and what you want to do or where you want to go. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit www.behance.net - You need a portfolio here, its perfect to keep updated about what is going on in any field of design and could create some nice exposure www.myfonts.com - they have a lot of good stuff there www.amsterdamadblog.com - Advertising is an interesting field, a lot of great and creative work is made, obviously I like the blog because it's based in Amsterdam, but they have interesting posts that matter internationally as well. www.theinspirationlist.com - all good stuff combined in 1 website, ain't that something? www.typeverything.com - The name says it all 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Don't look at what other people do too much, yes get inspired, but don't try to become something that already exists or that you aren't. Also be sure to follow my social media feeds and stuff. :) I will launch the Typejunkies Anonymous project soon, it will be a portfolio with only my lettering stuff in it. For an overview of all my work you can check www.gwer.nl. Thanks a lot for the interview!

Interview with Samantha Mash

Interview with Samantha Mash

Today we're gonna present another great young talent to you, Samantha Mash it's a illustrator just starting out on the creative area, but already have a great porfolio. We talked about her path, expectations and ideas on illustration, hope it you like it. You can see more from Samantha on the following links: Website Tumblr Shopr Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for art and illustration? I feel like everyone has a similar story; we all drew a lot when we were young and so on. Even as my peers started to grow out of drawing, I continued--it sort of became something that allowed me to have a skill that a lot did not have. I wasn't exactly a popular kid and drawing gave me space to express my dislike of social solitude, it was even a bit of a pacifier for the loneliness. I started to realize that art was one of the few things that made me happy, so I decided to pursue a career with it and go to school at Pacific Northwest College of Art where I just graduated this past month. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? I don't reference other artists, but I have a number that influence me. Through and through James Jean, Emily Carroll, Jillian Tamaki, Edward Gorey and John William Waterhouse. More recently though I have been really into modern Japanese animation from the 80s onward and have been referencing it in my style and subject matter in many places. 3) Your style is quite influenced by realism. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I have always felt the push and pull between a more realistic style and a more stylized one. I love animation and comics and have always wanted to work within the field, but for the longest time all I could draw was realistically because I was still learning and I really do like anatomical drawings. Going to PNCA and getting into life drawing classes for all four years really helped me flex and grow my skill sets. After getting down human and animal anatomy pretty solidly by my Junior year of college I have been able to experiment more and reach a happier medium between my two stylistic loves. I actively try to push myself towards the ideal exaggeration of the human form I see in my head and practice a lot; I wish I could say it came easily. I see my style as being a mesh of influences including what I like from realistic oil painting, shape based art, and anime style animation. I wish it had a specific style name! That would be a lot easier for me haha. Digital painting I suppose is the easiest way to classify it. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. My process if pretty slow. I start with a hand drawn graphite sketch on paper and scan it. From there I re-outline the whole piece and fix anatomy and some other basic problems. I fill in these lines with the base color I will be using and start to lay in simple shadows and highlights. From here it is all about refining, adding and taking away line and painting. They take anywhere from ten to thirty hours to make sometimes. 5)What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now and what would be the worst one? Please share with us more about your path. I'm not sure I have a best moment in my career yet because I've only been an official freelance artist for maybe a month. I am really excited about an illustration I've done coming out in the New Republic soon, and in the winter I will be publishing an art anthology with many other artists to start my way into art direction and a publishing career. I don't think I've had any terrible moments, everything is about learning and growing and all my clients have been a part of that. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Well I wake up, check my emails and contact clients about what I've been working on for their projects. Check a few social media sites, sketch a little maybe play a video game. I head out to work in the afternoon, as I have a supplementary job, come home at night, draw, eat, play more video games or read--then go to sleep and repeat the next day! 7) What's your favorite media to work with and why? I didn't have much money to fund an art habit when I was younger, however I realized if I could get a tablet and maybe Photoshop for cheap I could make as much art as I wanted for free. I was able to buy a second hand old Wacom tablet for less than ninety dollars, and I got a copy of Photoshop for free from a family friend. From then on I drew digitally and became quite comfortable with it. I love the medium and truly it is the only way to express how I want my art to look. Now I have been able to afford a new tablet and a much more updated edition of Photoshop thanks to selling my art, I feel like that is very full circle. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. 1. Always draw new things, never get stuck with one subject matter. 2. Explore your childhood interests, they will never fail to influence you and your style. 3. Try not to compare yourself to others, it is hard and I struggle with it myself but really you are the only person with your exact style and flair and it is unfair to yourself to try and compare your work to someone else's. 4. Market yourself, learn about your audience and never be afraid to contact people you'd like to work with or for. It all helps later on when you start out on your illustration career. 5. SLEEP. Seriously not enough artists sleep and eat on a regular schedule, manage your time and always get in some shut eye. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. http://www.juxtapoz.com/ http://hifructose.com/ http://spoke-art.com/blog/ http://theartofanimation.tumblr.com/ http://bitchmagazine.org/ 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Thanks for interviewing me! And to everyone out there who is working to be an artist, I wish I had something really cool to say. All I can think of is work hard, put yourself out there, and never be afraid to start contacting people--this business really is about the connections!

Interview with Nicolas François

Interview with Nicolas François

Interview with Nicolas François Recently we had the great opportunity to talk with the former Louis Vuitton product designer, Nicolas François. It's really nice to show more about the product design area, as we mostly talk about graphic design, web design and digital art here on Abduzeedo. So I hope you guys enjoy this interview and get inspired by it. You can see more from Nicolas on the following links: Behance Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for product design and fashion? As far as I can remember I have always been interested in product design. Since I am a little boy I have always wanted to modify products, to create toys or pieces of furniture, to make them better, nicer or more adapted to the use I had. I remember this miniature car I played with when I was 4 or 5. I have changed its color almost ten times using paint sprays. I have grown with a pen in my hand. I couldn't prevent myself from drawing everywhere even in classrooms. Drawing kept me focus on what the teacher said. I have found recently some old school books covered with drawings! My father was a brilliant engineer and I was getting good grades. That is why, nobody including me, would have considered my skills as something else than a pleasant activity for weekends and free times :). And then, one day I discovered in a book that some people could spend their life reconsidering everyday's products, creating new exciting functional objects, drawing all day long and have the feeling to change the world around ;) I was fascinated by their ability to communicate strong ideas through quick sketches and nice renderings, I decided to become a product designer! My interest for fashion came later in design school, I discovered that fashion was a sensitive, detail-orientated, and material-freak field of creation that would fit my skills and my interest for innovation. I quickly learnt that fashion is an extraordinary world where many things can be experimented within strong rules and quality requirements. This world also needs to be curious, people-oriented and, in a certain way, needs to understand how our times and habits are evolving more than simply applying basic trends. Finally, this is this intellectual aspect of fashion and product design that I enjoy the most! 2) Which designers do you use as reference? For fashion I am in love with the work of Yohji Yamamoto. He considers each look as a global product that needs to be designed. He manipulates materials and uses their technical properties more than anyone. Everything he designs is not only visual but functional and deeply refers to Japanese culture, I am fascinated by the strong power of his designs! I like this spirit of product design applied to fashion. I also had the chance to work briefly under the artistic direction of Paul Helbers for the Louis Vuitton's men fashion show. He made me realize that fashion was not only a community of crazy egocentric artists! He has a strong technical knowledge and a clear vision of what the collection must be, it is really easy to work with him as he understands how product design can bring some value to a fashion show, I have never met anyone in fashion with such an organized and precise state of mind. I do not really have a reference for product design. I am happy to note that the consideration for designers has changed for the past 10 years. all brands have understood the importance of design to make each product a success that is why I am more inspired by everyday's products. Look how Apple has changed our habits throughout product design! Look how Audi or Mercedes car designs can change our brand vision! Look how Louis Vuitton's designs have made LV one of the world's most desirable brand! Look how the last Celine bag has become one of the most popular "it bag" of all times! I keep on being fascinated by the way product design and graphic design can change consumer's perception of a brand! 3) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating. First of all, I try to get familiar with the brand I am working on and its customers, if the brand has already some products on the market, I will find some shops and see how the products really are, how they are displayed, who is going to buy them etc…If it is a new brand without any products I will ask for lots of pictures, moodboards, core values that could help me getting into their universe and understand what is the message and who is the target. For instance, I am currently working on the brand identity for a farm-produce company and a medical clinic. The best thing to do is to go visit their facilities. That is definitely my favorite way to find out about the environment of my clients and their expectations. Internet researches won't do this for you. Then, there is a large documentation phase starting with some benchmarks: - Who are the competitors ? Why are they stronger or weaker? - What products are made in the same spirit? - What are the actual trends in the field I am working on? You can find many sources but magazines are still really instructive! Then, I create a document that puts all my researches in a nutshell and send my analysis to the client. The idea is for him to validate what inspiration/environment the brand or the product should have. This document can be a pdf with many pages, some moodboards or material selection After this marketing debrief, I start doing some quick hand sketches to have a first feedback from the client and explore different looks, function, materials etc... We both make a selection of interesting items and I turn the selected product into realistic and seductive sketches for their internal presentation. That is a good way to validate some details before the industrial phase and to make your product understandable for everyone. I try to adapt the software I use to the product I am working on. From hand drawings/photoshop renders for fashion items to 3D renderings for industrial products. ...and then we can start the industrial phase, but this is another story! 4) What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now? Please share with us more about your path. As many designers I started with some internship in design Agencies. I had the chance to meet and work with the designer Alnoor Mitha where I learnt a lot about luxury and creative processes. The year after I started an internship in Louis Vuitton as a design assistant, I was very young and a product designer, not a fashion designer. Nobody believed that I would get a permanent job in this company with such a background. But I worked a lot, learnt so much about creation, design and high-end fashion that finally, artistic director Nicholas Knightley offered me a job. That was definitely the best moment in my career. Not only because it was Louis Vuitton, one of the most prestigious company in the world, but because it rewarded such a dedication to my work. That was also the demonstration that passion into creation will always be rewarded. I have worked 7 years at LV. I evolved from design assistant to senior designer working on many different projects, from bags to pen. I have also managed the special order department where I have created the most exciting pieces of design ever! As a creative person you need to change your work environment quite often to keep on being inspired. I got a great opportunity within the fashion brand TeddySmith where I created the luggage and accessories department, that was an amazing adventure and I realized that I could provide my luxury market skills and knowledge of leather goods craftsmanship to many brands. That is how I decided to become a freelance designer. 5) How do you describe your daily routine? I wake up at 7 and have a quick breakfast. I spend about one hour from 8 to 9 at the gym. As a freelance designer you spend a lot of time at your office, that is why you need some time to take care of your mind and body. Then I deal with administrative tasks. I answer to emails, take appointments, send invoices, make quotations etc…this is quite a huge part of being a freelance designer. I have a Whiteboard with all the current projects and deadlines and check what should be "today's topic". Of course I have in mind all my projects and what I have to do but to see things written is a good way to organize yourself and be efficient. Then it really depends on what you are working on and on what stage you are. I can spend hours and hours creating and drawing. Sometimes, I just need to go out and see people walking in the street to get some details and inspiration. I try not to finish too late as you get slower and less creative during the night. Moreover you need to give yourself some limits and have a social life, but working late is part of the job and you often find the right idea after midnight. 6) What is your favorite project till this date? Why? Ah ah ! I could mention so many interesting projects. I am currently working on a smartphone application that could change a lot the way we interact with each other and organize events. I am also designing some products for a new english luxury brand. That is really challenging to create a brand from nothing. I have also designed some luggages with LV for a car created by the Japanese brand Nissan. It was really exciting to work with people from another culture. But the best project was the Luggage Kart I designed for the Louis Vuitton men's fashion show. I had 2 weeks to design and manage the development of this product. As you know, you have to be ready for the show, it can't wait! I worked nights and days to get 3 prototypes in due time, I was fully responsible for this project and I couldn't fail. Just before the show a model broke one of the prototype during the training, I had to decide if we take the risk to show the product in front of the whole world press and the most important fashion people. I decided to let the 2 last karts participate to the show and everything was a success, but that was the most stressful moment in my entire life. 7) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every designer. - Inspiration trips you must do - "Details make difference" your motto will be - In every project some fun you will find - Not only design magazines you will read - Out of your office you should go 8) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. - www.trendsnow.net - www.wgsn.com - www.behance.com - www.howdesign.com - www.lemonde.fr 9) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Thank you and please forgive my English. I just have one last thing to say : Have fun and keep on watching the world with the passionate eyes you had when you started your design school!

Interview with Ben Kwok aka. Bioworkz

It's really funny how we stumble into someone's work nowadays, we got a lot of galleries, portfolio platforms, blogs and art shops. I got extremely amazed by the work of Ben Yin-Pan Kwok aka. Bioworkz while looking for posters on Society 6, a black and white illustration style that can really stuck on one's mind. Ben have worked for the apparel industry on several companies on the past 7 years, giving him a great experience on both digital and traditional medias. Nowadays he seem to be pursuing a unity on his personal work, trying to make more and more detailed illustrations on his already well known black and white style. Today we have this exclusive interview with him, I hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Ben on the following links: Website Behance Facebook Linkedin Twitter DevianArt Society 6 1) First of all, I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and digital art? Not a problem, thank you for taking the time to interview me. I've always known that I wanted to do something with art. I have been doodling since I could remember and I really enjoyed it. Went through college with the plan of being a graphic artist. Realized immediately that playing with fonts and layouts was not for me. To draw on paper felt right, so I changed my major into Illustration. Upon graduation, I didn't do much with my degree, until I stumbled into the apparel industry. From there I learnt how to use photoshop, illustrator, and the silk screen process. Now 8 years later, here I am doing what I love. Valkyrie2) Which artists do you use as reference? I don't like to reference other artists and their style, but I do admire and I am inspired by a lot of different artist. Some of the artists I admire are David A. Smith, Aaron Horkey, Audrey Kawasaki, Hydro74, Derrick Castle, and Joe A. King to name a few. They are all very detail oriented and I just absolutely love it. Every time they release a new piece of art, I feel like they up the ante for everyone in the art world. Ornately Decorated Animals3) Your style is quite influenced by realism and pattern design. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I've always like lots of details and patterns. I remember doing lots of simple shapes such as hearts, flowers, and butterflies all made of paisley patterns. Eventually it got more complex and fitting everything together was a fun puzzle. Then I stumbled upon Iain Macarthur's work and it blew my mind. I thought to myself "wait, I don't have to use any particular types of patterns. I can do whatever I want". It all started with my "Ornate Owl" which was heavily influenced by Macarthur's style. I enjoyed the process so much that I decided to explore different animals and patterns. That was the launching pad for the rest of the animals I've illustrated. Exploring different patterns, animals, medium, techniques. The possibilities are endless. I would call this style ornate if I needed to give it a label. Ornate Grizzly Bear4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I'm on the web a lot so I search for random images of animals, particularly on Pinterest. Sometimes I plan on drawing a bird, but find a different animal that sparks my interest and go in that direction instead. First, I would sketch out the general shape and outline of the animal. Once that is complete I would create a type of wire frame around the whole animal. Sectioning off different parts such as the legs, wings, head, or wherever my imagination takes me. From there I start creating random patterns that fits into each section and that's how it all builds. If I like the sketch, I'll take it into the computer, blow it up, and traced the sketch onto an illustration board and that's where the fun begins. I don't have a set way of working, it all depends on my mood. Sometimes I want to challenge myself, so I would use the stippling technique. Other times I want to do something loose and not so precise so the artwork looks sketchy. Life is Good (Illustrations)5) What would you consider the best moment on you career till now? The best moment is realizing that I don't have to work a 9 to 5 job to make a living. I could actually make a living pursuing my passion. To create artwork that I'm proud of with zero compromise. It's like seeing a light at the end of the tunnel. I'm still holding down a part-time job because to be honest, freelance work is unpredictable and I'm in no position to throw all caution into the wind. The response I've been getting from my ornate animals is beyond all expectation and it just makes me want to create more. Now I am interested in doing gallery work and displaying my work as a piece of art. Moonlight Raven6) How do you describe your daily routine? I have a part-time job life and a freelance/fine art life. But let's focus on the fun stuff...freelance/fine art. I like to start my morning at 6:30am with a nice breakfast and lots of water because that's what I'm suppose to do. Then play with my Cocker Spaniel puppy named Butters for about an hour. With a ice cold can of Monster, off to my home office I go. Yes, energy drinks are bad for you...blah blah blah. I'm usually juggling a few professional and personal projects. I focus on professional projects first because there's a schedule to keep and that how I make a living. Depending on how many freelance projects I have at the moment, they all must be attended to first before I move on to anything else. When I'm waiting on feedback for the freelance work, I would jump into personal projects. That will usually take up the rest of my day and night, unless I get feedback clients quickly, then back to freelance work. Like I said, freelance work has priority over personal work. After a full day, I would take a break and take Butters to the dog park with my wife. It's good to step away from the work. It allows me to decompress and come back with a fresh perspective and continue the work till 10pm. Eye of the Tiger7) What's your favorite media to work with?Why? As silly as this sounds, I love using a simple black ball point pen by BIC. I think it's the most underrated tool for artists. It simply does everything. From soft subtle shading to deep rich lines. It's like drawing with a pencil, but you can't get deep blacks and isn't waterproof. I can shade with regular pens such as a Micron, but the shading I get from a BIC pen is richer and true. The lines made by other pens are absolute, there's very little variation in the tones. I do have to be careful when the BIC pen bleeds, it tends to do that a lot when I'm shading. The trick is to have a piece of tissue ready at all times to constantly wipe of the excess ink buildup before shading the next section. Ornate Koala8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. 1) Practice Practice Practice!!! There's always someone better than you, so you got to keep improving. 2) It's good to step away from your work after a few hours, especially if you've been cramming for a long time. Take a breather, relax a bit and come back refreshed. It'll make a huge difference in the quality of work. 3) Critiques are not personal, some critiques can be harsh, but it has nothing to do with you personally. Your clients like your work, that's why they wanted to work with you in the first place. 4) Have integrity and keep your word. If you say you'll deliver the work on Friday, you better deliver it on Friday (or earlier). Excuses only makes you look unprofessional and undependable. Things don't always go as planned but do your best and stay in communication with your clients. 5) Don't ever undersell yourself. You're only hurting yourself and the whole art community. Always get 50% upfront payment (or 40/40/20), and never do free spec work. Your time is valuable, if you don't appreciate it, your potential clients won't either. Ornately Decorated Rooster9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. 1) Society6.com 2) CGhub.com 3) Pinterest.com 4) Deviantart.com 5) FFFFound.com Ornate Leopard10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Do your research, there are lots of freelance books and magazines out there. Listen to illustration podcasts to get informed on trends and what other artists are doing. Get inspired and create some kick ass illustrations!!!

Interview with Freak City

Interview with Freak City

Freak City is a skillfull illustrator from Bordeaux, France borned in the mid 80's. With a great taste for punk rock and skateboard imagery, you probably already saw some of his illustrations thru the web. Today we're glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Freak City on the following links: Website Behance Facebook Twitter Tumblr 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and poster art? For as long as I can remember ! As a young child, I was intrigued and fascinated by cartoons and people who could actually draw them, so I was hooked ! It felt just natural and logical from that point to get more involved with the concept of creating images, art, drawings, cartoons, whatever… It’s really important to notice that for me it was always related to music a lot, so I spent my teenage years drawing artworks for imaginary bands, fantasizing about how the best band should look like. And then later, it was time to create flyers and covers for my own bands, my friends’ and for people who started noticing that something was happening in the crazy-but-fun-punk-mutants style! 2) Which artists do you use as reference? So many that It’s impossible to list them properly ! I’m always curious and willing to learn about history of visual arts and stuff. So, graphical references are equally important as musical ones, but cinema, cartoons, politics, literature and many other things come to mind too. That said, I could probably name Charles Burns and Jim Phillips as main obvious drawing influences, but also Joost Swarte, Jano, Escher, Bosch or Memphis Design as essential parts of my world. I’m just too curious and passionate to limit myself to one art form. 3) Your style is quite influenced by skateboard graphics and poster art. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? Like I said, it was natural cause I was a punk rock kid who skateboarded from an early age. I was always impressed by how a drawing could be powerful and expressive. There was so much fun and aggression in the skate/punk rock department that it was obviously attractive and meaningful for a nasty brat ! And very important, I could relate to people who drew these things, cause they were grown-up kids who hadn’t really changed since their teen years. Those pictures really described the way I felt as a teenager, and it hasn’t really changed since then ! Pissed off for sure, but always with a lot of humor ! It’s pretty much something that I can’t get rid of, even if I wanted to. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I rarely start from random sketches. I hate drawing in a rush, even if it tends to happen more lately as I’ve been overbooked a lot. I’m kinda slow to start, I need to search and think a lot about my subjects to understand what I’m doing, synthesize informations and finally get the good idea. Then It’s about time to sketch, make roughs, scan and send them to clients and see if something has to be changed. If the graphic design needs a strong structure and architecture, I might help myself with Photoshop to build strong lines. I will then ink the full drawing before coloring it digitally, depending on what media i’m working on. These are the basics of everyday illustration, what i mostly do, but that might change a bit if i’m painting or working on a screenprinted poster. Then it’s all about learning new tricks to get better and more efficient at what I’m doing! 5) What's the best thing about working with illustration and what is the worst? The best thing is obviously having to work on something you totally love. Creating a unique and personal world that you evolve in everyday, and to which people can relate to. Being psyched on every new project, making it an integral part of your global direction and just loving it. Managing to draw something that came straight from your brains is just a great feeling. The worst is always having to deal with people, in the sense that it’s sometimes really hard to understand each other. It’s a real challenge, part of what makes it exciting, but it can also be a real pain in the ass. It’s just a matter of good communication, and I hate when I can’t communicate properly with people to help things get better. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have any hobbies? Wake up at 8am, breakfast, check emails, start drawing and working until i’m too tired to think straight. During this living hell, i might have been practicing with my band, riding around to get some fresh air, and listening to music full time. This might seem dull and unfun but i need the discipline to help myself, concentrate and be efficient. Then when i think i’ve been good enough and deserve a little break, it’s hobbies time ! Which in my case are plenty, i’m all about sports, music, reading a lot, spending time with my girlfriend and whatnot. I just wish i had more time for hobbies, even if my job is also one. 7) What is your favorite media so far? Paintbrush and ink on a nice cream paper ! Inking in black China ink is the thing I love the most, as I’m not a big digital guy. Also, the process of screenprinting is something both really exciting and hard, it requires a lot a patience and precision, I love that too. That said, I really need to explore new medias to get a better perspective of my own work, and what I tried so far, as different medias go, was really motivating : Bodypainting, murals, animation… I really want to invest myself more into these disciplines and give my work new options. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. Even though I’m not the oldest illustrator around, I already learnt some very valuable lessons. 1. Mistakes are natural parts of progression, so you gotta accept to make them and learn the most from what you did wrong. 2. That said, don’t make the same mistake twice!!! 3. Never forget that your career is a personal choice, so think of all the positive aspects of it when times are tough. 4. Learn to listen from people around you, and don’t pretend to be 100% right all the time. People’s advices and tastes are important, it will give you a better perspective of a work you don’t always have a good hindsight of. 5. Always aim for the best. Give 200%. You gotta be your hardest critic and simply demand the best from yourself. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. I’m checking www.fluoglacial.com daily, run by a friend of mine, and all about cold and dark music, literature, cinema and whatnot. Also, my girlfriend runs the company Atelier Kobalt, so i always go there and check what’s up, cause i also work on the project : http://atelierkobalt.tumblr.com/ Apart from that, i confess that i kinda lost interest in surfing on the web, so i mostly check online portfolios, cause I’m always curious about what’s being created. I like to visit many different websites, but honestly I couldn’t name you 5 that I’m totally addicted to. 10)Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Always remember that this job is a dream job, even with its negative aspects. It can be excruciating and nervebreaking sometimes, but it still is something that we chose to do ourselves, since we were children. Don’t let that dream fade away, but be ready to suffer for it. It demands time and effort, but it’s worthwhile.

Interview with JKB Fletcher

Interview with JKB Fletcher

Photorealism or hyperrealism, anyway you would like to call it, it's indeed one of the most hard and time-consuming artistic styles to learn. So, today we had the opportunity to interview one of it's contemporary masters and know about him and his work. Please welcome JKB Fletcher. You can see more from JKB Fletcher on the following links: Website Behance Youtube Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and art? I suppose the best way to explain it would be that I have always had a passion for drawing or creating. My family is full of people who are creative, artistic and very capable with a pencil, so my passion in the subject stems from an early exposure to drawing and painting. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? Rothko, Koons, Minter, Matisse... 3) Your style is quite influenced by hyperrealism and photography. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? The style naturally developed while I was familiarising myself with oil paints during uni, as my paintings progressed closer to realism I became hooked on trying to finish the painting to a photorealistic finish. I am technically a photorealist/hyperrealist painter, although I often create works quite 'painterly' that wouldn't fall under that category. A lot of my recent paintings usually have areas of high detail and realism while the rest of the work is gestural and painterly. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. The process often starts with a quick sketch, then booking in a model that will work for the image I have in mind. If I'm painting directly onto the model l will do so before setting up the lighting. In the photo shoot I'll take around 100-200 photographs, edit and crop the photos and choose the most suitable photo and start painting from the photograph. I will usually do an underpainting or drawing before I lay the colour down. After the painting is finished it is varnished and professionally photographed before it is sent to the gallery/client. 5) What's the best thing about working with art and what is the worst? I guess it would be the same thing; going to work with people like Rothko and Matisse on the mind. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have any hobbies? My daily routine when things are calm and organised usually involves a relatively early start after driving to the studio. I sit at the computer and do a little work before putting on some music or an audio book and begin painting. I usually get hungry at about 1pm and paint until 5/6pm. I'd go to the gym on the way home where I might do some more computer work. However, when I'm working towards a show or deadline then I'm usually at the studio from about 6:30am until 8/9pm getting food and workouts in wherever I can. I hate to say that it happens more often than I care to admit. 7) Tell us something about you most people don't know. I was a statement Dyslexic at 8yrs old… I have an obsession with doing exercise… 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every artist. I suppose the most useful advice I have received would be; 'Listen, try to stay objective, try to be interested not interesting, study your failures, and I think most importantly work on refining your discipline'. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. My search history tells me the 5 most visited sites are; 3quarks daily, The Loop, Behance, YouTube, Facebook. 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. At the risk of repeating myself I would say; Shut up, and listen…!

Interview with Tobias Hall

Interview with Tobias Hall

Nowadays you gotta be multimedia in order to be successful on the creative area, even If you're not a specialist on every task, you gotta know a bit of everything. Tobias Hall is a great example of this, having a spetacular range of work from the most diverse medias, today we had a opportunity to talk about it and other subjects. You can see more from Tobias on the following links: Website Behance Tumblr Twitter Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and typography? It’s an honour to be asked! Well I suppose I’ve always liked drawing, but I never really took it seriously until I started studying illustration at University. Even then though, I didn’t think I would be able to make a career out of it – it was only after I had graduated that I decided I would give it a go. Since then my style has developed and evolved over the last few years – I think I’m just reaching a point where I’ve settled on what I think I want my illustration work to look like. My love for typography and lettering is a far more recent development though: I found myself drawing a lot of lettering towards the end of 2012 and really enjoyed it, so this year I’ve been trying to develop that side of my practice – it’s great to start getting recognised for it! 2) Which artists do you use as reference? Throughout university I was obsessed with the work of David Foldvari, so his way of drawing was certainly an influence. I’m also a massive Keith Haring fan, but maybe that is less evident in my recent work. On the typography side I’m a big fan of artists such as Seb Lester, Ged Palmer, Steven Bonner, Matt Lyons, Martin Schmetzer, David A. Smith… there are loads! 3) Your style is quite influenced by graphic design and realism. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I’ve always had a really keen interest in graphic design and clean lines, and have always been keen to combine that with my drawing style, but only recently have I successfully started doing that within my illustration work. When I graduated my work was quite flat and lacked any real tonal range, but I wanted to start creating stuff that had a bit more sophistication and atmosphere. The introduction of tone, shadow and lighting allowed me to do that. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I’ll start by drawing my subject using reference photos, then I’ll scan the lines into photoshop and start applying blocks of colour. After that I’ll use the pen tool to start building up areas of black on the ‘Soft Light’ layer setting to introduce tone and shadow, before using the reaser on low opacity to blend those areas. Finally I add texture. 5) What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now? Please share with us more about your path. I got lucky quite early in my career. A restaurant chain called Zizzi saw my work at an exhibition straight after I had graduated and asked me to paint a mural for one of their restaurants in London. After that I painted a couple more, and then ended up working in-house for them as an illustrator, designer and art director. I’m still in that role now, but my contract is only 3 days a week, which allows me to work on other projects when they come in. It’s a perfect balance. More recently, I’ve just finished a mural for the Holiday Inn in Camden, London, which has gone down really well with people and gotten me a lot of exposure. It’s still early days but it feels like that could be a really important project in my career. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Most days I’ll get up at around 7.30, then get on the tube and go into London where I work in-house for Zizzi. I’ll get home from there at around 7pm and if I’m really busy I’ll do some more work in the evening. On the days I’m not working with Zizzi, I’ll (get up slightly later and) work from my little studio at home. I try to work on personal projects whenever things are quiet elsewhere, it’s always nice to have that freedom. 7) On the last years you've dedicated yourself to mural art, but I gotta say it looks a lot to your illustration/design work. What you think about working with this media and what we can expect from you on the near future? The only reason I’ve had the chance to work on so many mural projects is because of the work I do with Zizzi – they have over 100 restaurants nationwide, and they have murals painted in all of their new or refurbished restaurants, so there’s been plenty of work for me there! There are a couple more mural projects in the pipeline, but I also want to focus developing my lettering and illustration for print. I really want to get involved in a few more editorial/advertising projects, which I haven’t had the chance to do yet. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. If you don’t ask you don’t get. Make the most of opportunity. Learn from your mistakes. Exceed your clients’s expectations. Be nice. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit Let’s assume that Abduzeedo is a given :) Twitter Behance.net http://industryandinterest.com/ http://www.itsnicethat.com/ http://hifructose.com/ 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Make good work and show it to everyone. Murals 2011 from Tobias Hall on Vimeo.

Interview with Kutan Ural

Interview with Kutan Ural

Here on Abduzeedo we always try to provide content from all parts of the world, not only inspiration but also good interviews. Today we had the opportunity to talk with the Instanbul based designer, Kutan Ural, well knowed for his typography work referencing the turkish culture. You can see more from Kutan on the following links: Website Twitter Behance Tumblr Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for typography and font design? Thank you so much, this honour belongs to me. As I am a graphic designer I have always been interested in typography and font design but for about 3-4 years ago, it became a passion for me. I am enjoying to play with words, letters, fonts. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? Actually, I can not give you specific names for references, I always take a look to the design reference sites and there are a lot of great artists, but apart from typography there are a lot of great and inspirational street artists, such as; Banksy, Obey, Eine, Blu, Ewol, etc. 3) Your style is quite influenced by classic and retro typography. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I love creating works related with typography. Everything began 4 years ago, these type of typographic works were not that popular at those days, I began creating some works, using retro style collating with my own culture. For example I chose some central points in Istanbul and created Istanbul Typography series, using the classical western style with Turkish culture or some quotes from Classical Turkish Music. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. Inspiration is the first and most important step, the things you live, listen, watch, read... When a good idea comes to my mind I begin working and mostly I finish at one night. 5)What's would you consider the best moment on you career till now? Please share with us more about your path. Well I have very beautiful memories. I created the Istanbul Typography series, shared it, and next day my phone was ringing all the time, had like 200 mails in my inbox. Another great moment I remember is, we had moved İstanbul two years ago, my first work was designing a book cover for April Publishing House, had only an hour, and I finished it in 50 minutes. The book (Good Daughters by Joyce Maynard) became a bestseller in Turkey. It was a great pleasure to see it on bookstores. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? My office is at the heart of Istanbul. I share an office with a publishing house and a production company. We have daily morning meetings, share ideas, chat and begin working. Mostly we make BBQ and all our friends, mostly artists and authors, visit our office and all these meetings give you new ideas, inspirations... 7) What's your favorite typeface and why? Well it changes time to time, design to design.. I think nowadays my favourite typeface is Novecento Wide. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every type designer. I think for a type designer examination is the most important thing, examine the people, places that you live, books, etc. So I think the 5 lessons should only be examine, examine, examine, examine & examine. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit behance.net, mr-cup.com, fromupnorth.com, ffffound.com and of course, your site, abduzeedo =) 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Thank you for your interest, It's a pleasure to make an interview with you, My message to the newly starting fellows is 'work hard and good luck.' #occupyistanbul & #occupybrazil

Interview with Raphael Vicenzi aka. Dead Pony

Interview with Raphael Vicenzi aka. Dead Pony

I think that everyone into fashion art and design must know illustrator Raphael Vincenzi, probably one of the biggest name on the fashion illustration in the world, we already featured his artworks several times on Abduzeedo. Today we're lucky and glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Raphael on the following links: Website Behance Etsy Store Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and art? Yes no problem, thank you for asking me to do this. I always wanted to do something creative but I wasn't sure about what to do really. I discovered quite late in life that you could create art with a computer and I started to get interested in this. I worked my way up but I had to build some personal visual references and world and understand how to make an image. The ability to express myself in this field has been a blessing even though it is not necessarily easy. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? A lot. It is more often a loose inspiration than not. From Banksy, Chloe Early, Bouguereau, Klimt, Stina Persson, Daniel Egnéus, Illustrators from the sixties and so on. It's all on my tumblr... 3) Your style is quite influenced by fashion design and paintings. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I think it is still an ongoing process, I think at first I was looking for a way to connect my different interests in art, fashion, collages & graphic design. As I just work in digital I found a way to combine all of this but I don't pretend to have developped an unique style. As there is no chance I can become a fashion designer or a painter I think it allows me to do it in a rough DYI way. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece Sometimes I have an idea that I think I will be able to realize and I start working on it before it goes away. It happens that I just start something for the sake of doing something and I manage to take it to the end. I mainly use Photoshop, draw stuff in there with brushes I made myself, then I start adding up textures that I scanned and created with watercolours, markers, paints and so on. I've got hundreds of them so I can pick and mix what fits the mood of the piece I am working on. It's quite an unconscious process with trials and errors. Usually my errors are way better than if I try to force it a certain way so I try to accept this as part of my process. I am building up the image bits by bits, going back and forth, adding elements, typography and so on. I trash a lot of unfinished pieces though but I suppose they help me to get to the next finished one. I don't have control over the whole process although I am trying to keep some focus in mind to finish it. 5)What's the best thing about working with illustration and what is the worst? From my point of view it is a creative job so nothing can beat that, the ability to share what I do with people around the world is really great. The worst is that I sometimes spend too much time in front of a computer. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have nay hobbies? Not very exciting, I wake up early drive my wife to work & child to school then I come home and start working. I live a dull life, the only way to be productive. I am not always very creative, sometimes I just hit a wall and it's the hardest part to get through, struggling for the inspiration to come back in every possible way by reading something, listening to music & looking for inspiring art on the web. I am dabbling a bit into music as a hobby but I am really bad at it, I have no rythm but I keep doing it anyway, I am really into dark minimal wave music and 80's stuff. I am always interested in how people can make great stuff with very few skills and just a desire to express themselves even if it's awkward. 7) You're a multimedia artist, but talking about techniques, what is your favorite so far? I am not sure I have a favorite technique so far, it's just the way I work, adding bits and pieces from different techniques and hope that I find interesting connections between them. I do like to create textures myself though, just enjoying the childish pleasure of slapping paint all over a sheet of paper. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. 1 - Keep doing what you do best but fail a lot by doing something else 2 - Put your works online 3 - Don't bother comparing yourself with everybody else 4 - Look for inspiration everywhere ( books, nature, music, cities, yourself...) 5 - Don't think that being recognized as an illustrator will solve all your problems 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit Tumblr ffffound Booooooom graffart.eu & abduzeedo of course 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Just do your own thing, you never know where it might lead you.

Interview: Tais Horta Trovão

It is time for a new interview presenting you talented people I had the pleasure to meet in San Francisco Bay Area. Today I will introduce you to Tais Horta Trovão, a super talented graphic and surface designer. And I'm also super proud to say that I got the chance to know even more about Tais' work and style because she is a good friend of mine. So from knowing her I can tell that Tais loves her craft and shows this love in everything she does. From wedding invitations to kids birthdays invitations to beautiful decor for an afternoon tea with friends (or 4th of July lunch or whatever event you may think of), she will always make sure you are surrounded by beauty. Tais is Brazilian, she was born in Rio de Janeiro, where she graduated in Design at PUC-Rio. Tais moved to the Silicon Valley in February/2010 and it is currently leaving in San Francisco. She has a really cool blog where she shows her work, inspiration and even some recipes, everything in both English and Portuguese, certainly worth a visit. Enjoy the interview and some of her inspiring pieces! Where to find Tais: Portfolio Blog Facebook Pinterest Instagram Twitter Tell us more about you, your interests and about the things you like. I'm a very curious person. I love to learn new things, explore new places, meet people, cultures and try different food. I think it is pretty interesting to see how other people think... this inspire me and makes me learn a lot! I always try stay in a constant cycle where I look "outside in" to improve what I can (and this is not easy, laughs). I'm also someone that adopts the "do it yourself" life style. Hands-on work and Google are my two best friends! When did you start getting interested in design, surface pattern design, wedding invitations, etc? Did you like drawing since you were a child? Since I was a kid, I've always liked creating things. My mom used to make the themes/decor of my birthday parties and I loved watching her create everything. Also, I've always preferred art, literature and history classes over chemistry or biology for instance. One day when I was finishing High School I attended some professional orientation lectures and then I discovered that graphic design was a real career. After that I had no doubts on what I wanted to do, I was thrilled! My interest in surface pattern design started after I graduated, when I was working for fashion companies like FARM and Maria Filó in Brazil. As for the wedding invitations, it is funny because I've never been that girl who used to dream about her wedding, but as a professional, this is the area that fulfills me the most. Was there a specific moment when you knew what career to follow? I was totally sure even before college, while I was studying for vestibular (in Brazil you have to study for a test to go into college, it is called vestibular). During college, in a few parts of the course, I thought I was in the wrong area, that I didn't have the profile. You know, we believe that to be a designer you only need to be creative or have talent, but this is not the truth. At least it is not only about that. You also have to learn to not be afraid of failing, to open up to critiques and understand how you can improve with them, instead of focusing only on the negative side. You have to know how to work in a team, have to know to share ideas without worrying that people will steal them, you need different inspiration channels. And mostly, you have to know how to solve problems in an straight forward way. All of this I notice during my years in college, and I have to admit it made me a bit unsure of my decision. But when I realized those were "internal" issues and not professional issues, I moved on and I don't regret it. And today I know for sure that I've chosen the right career, although I'm constantly learning. What inspires you? My husband, places, cultures, technology, artists, typography... it is a huge list. How did you develop your style? Those who know me well usually say my style has my very own personality, who I really am. And I like when I hear that because I agree that our style comes from the way we are. But it also includes our sources of inspiration and what we like in a specific moment. Putting in another words, I believe the development of our style is when you mix all of those things, as in a cake batter. Each ingredient has its right proportion and then you style is the result of putting all of them together. Do you have any specific artists/styles you like to use as a reference? I have a lot of them! I will summarize in a list of some designers, professionals from different areas and blogs that for some reason became a good source of inspiration lately. Chloé Fleury Seamless Creative Lisa Congdon Amy Moss | Eat Drink Chic Joy Cho | Oh Joy Jordan Ferney | Oh happy Day Maybelle Imasa-Stukuls Audrey Woollen Sara Tso How is your creative process? Do you have a step-by-step routine you like to follow or you do things as inspiration strikes? The creative process it is not only inspiration. I have to follow a certain methodology. I like to get know more about the interests and taste of the client, specially when I'm working in a wedding invitation project, which is something really personal. The ideal is to receive a good briefing, because from the briefing I understand where the client wants to go, what the product is, which concept they want to imply, where and which are the "problems" to be solved. Afterwards I do some research, both inspirational and visual, before I start ideating. This process is very important to me and I try to follow it in every project I take. The methodology is basically the same for every one of them. How long does it take for your work to get ready? Is it a continuos process or you do it in parts? The time to finish a project actually changes every time, it depends on the project itself, the deadline, the briefing I receive from my client, the time they take to give me a feedback, etc. What are your work tools? I work mainly with Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign (for editorial projects). But before I start in the computer I like to work with traditional stuff. Things like paper, textures, a little bit of caligraphy that I've learned and anything else I may find important. Do you have any for those pursuing this type of career? In this type of work or any other work actually, do something that you like and that will make you happy! What are your favorite books and websites about your area of work? Once again I have a huge list, but here are the ones that came to my mind first. Websites: Green Wedding Shoes Oh so beautiful paper Paper Lovely Beyond Beyond Poppy Talk 100 layer cake Myfonts Books: Creative, Inc.: The Ultimate Guide to Running a Successful Freelance Business Little Book of Letterpress Vintage Wedding Style: More than 25 Simple Projects and Endless Inspiration for Designing Your Big Day Where the magic happens? When I'm creating my home office is the best place. When working in research, organizing deadlines, developing proposals and writing my posts, I like to go to coffee shops because I can get way more focused than at home, it is impressive! What is your opinion about the design field today? Do you believe that artists are more recognized nowadays? I do. I believe that artists are being more and more recognized each day, but it is a field that has a lot of growth to do, specially in Brazil. Do you think that living in SF helped your career? Yes, it helped for sure, but not necessarily San Francisco. I believe it was the fact of allowing myself to live abroad, to get out of my comfort zone, to give myself time to think about what I wanted, to learn about new things and find myself again that helped my career. Of course the place makes a difference, but I think this is more of an internal issue than external. I've been learning a lot with this experience and this certainly reflects on how I position myself professionally. Do you think there is a difference between the design community here and in Brazil? In general, people here are not afraid of sharing their knowledge. People meet, discuss ideas and always want to get together to build something. I don't like to generalize, I'm comparing it by the majority. But the good thing is that I've been seeing people in Brazil changing their way of thinking, they are paying attention to what is happening here and how those things are happening (which is pretty important). People are starting to get things done there too, and I feel really happy about this! Do you believe that here in the USA designers are more valued? I think so, specially compared to Brazil. Where to find Tais: Portfolio Blog Facebook Pinterest Instagram Twitter

Interview: Cristina de Lera

Interview: Cristina de Lera

Since I moved to San Francisco Bay Area I had the chance to meet a lot of talented and inspiring artists. And the great thing about this is that I have the chance to share more about them here with you. Since Abduzeedo is all about sharing inspiration and introducing new artists, nothing better then interviewing the amazing people I got the chance to meet. Today I will show you more about a very talented illustrator from Barcelona, Cristina de Lera, which style is delicate, beautiful and packed with personality. Cristina is an illustrator from Barcelona that is currently based in San Francisco. She studied Art History at the Barcelona University (UB) and Illustration at the Design School BAU, also in Barcelona. Her work is super stylish and unique. The colors, delicate lines and cartoonish characters expressions in her artworks conquered my heart and will certainly do the same with you. Enjoy the interview and some artworks we will show here! Where to find Cristina: Portfolio Flickr Tumblr Behance Facebook Pinterest Etsy Want a Custom Portrait Illustration? Cristina can draw one for you, check out how to get one. ;) Tell us more about you, your interests and about the things you like. When I'm not drawing, I enjoy cooking, listening to music, writing, walking and taking photos, and traveling. I'm fascinated by history and other cultures. I always have the Why question in my head. Maybe that's the reason I studied Art History (you have everything I like there: traveling to other places of the world through their art!) :D When did you start getting interested in illustration? Did you like drawing since you were a child? I always liked arts and crafts. My first memories are making pottery when I was around 6 years old. I loved it! I was fascinated to make things with clay! That phase lasted around a year, I don't remember how it ended. But that moment is when I changed clay for color pencils and I never left them. I started getting interested more seriously when I was 14, and I've been self-taught until I began attending workshops by illustrators at Escola de la Dona in Barcelona, while studying the Art History degree at the university. Was there a specific moment when you knew what career to follow? After finishing the university degree, I realized that I wanted to work as an illustrator. In that moment, and thanks to the previous workshops, I was selected to course a Postgraduate Degree in Illustration at BAU Design School, where teachers are professional very talented illustrators, such as Berto Martinez, Conrad Roset, Chidy Wayne, Carmen Segovia. What inspires you? Everything inspires me! Most of all, I love to draw people, and I think a good definition of my style is a mix of cute and vintage. Since I was born in the 80s, I love the pop culture of that decade. I also have a strong influence by memories of my childhood, such as japanese manga and anime. I love the kawaii characters of Japan! And another huge influence on my work is Art History. It helped me to notice the structure in the paintings composition and the choice of colors. Do you have any specific artists/styles you like to use as a reference? The styles that influence me are related to children's picture books, where you can find a lot of color and a variety of compositions in the storytelling. I always have the art of the 19th century and the first half of 20th century as a reference: the Pre Raphaelite painters (John William Waterhouse, John Everett Millais), the French and Catalan impressionists (Edgar Degas, Santiago Rusiñol), William Turner, Vincent Van Gogh, Gustav Klimt, Alphonse Mucha, the Bauhaus, Pop Art. Some illustrators that I admire: Marc Boutavant, Aurelie Gillerey, Oliver Jeffers, Ben Javens, Gemma Correll, Julia Bereciartu, Natascha Rosenberg, Irena Freitas, Isabelle Arsenault, Amaia Arrazola, Phillip Giordano, Paloma Valdivia, Bubi Au Yeung, Carson Ellis, and Japanese illustrators and artists such as Hayao Miyazaki, Taro Gomi and Yoshitomo Nara. I can't say them all, it's a list that never ends. Literally! This is a board on Pinterest where I pin every illustration that strikes me for some reason: http://pinterest.com/cristinadelera/illustration/ And this is my own work board: http://pinterest.com/cristinadelera/my-illustrations/ How is your creative process? Do you have a step-by-step routine you like to follow or you do things as inspiration strikes? I don't have a routine when it comes to art. When I have an idea, I usually draw it. I always scan my sketches, so if I want to work later with them in Photoshop, I have them ready. Most of my work is not digital, so when I finish scanning, I take the sketch, I trace it on the paper with the help of a lightbox and a hard pencil, and then I ink in or I leave the pencil, depending on how I want the final result. Then I apply the watercolors. How long does it take for your work to get ready? Is it a continuos process or you do it in parts? As I usually work with watercolors and ink, I have to stop in different moments of the process to let the paper dry. I normally work with one illustration at a time, unless it is a series of illustrations where I use the same colors. What are your work tools? Pencils, markers (Faber Castell PITT Artist pens and Sakura Pigma Micron), watercolors (I use Winsor and Newton half pans), Escoda brushes (sable hair), Winsor and Newton black indian ink, Fabriano watercolor paper for the traditional illustrations. Sometimes I use gouaches (Talens). My digital tools are an iMac 27 inch 2.9MhZ, a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet, a printer with scanner (HP Photosmart 5520) and Photoshop. What do you like most about your work? About illustration I love to put into paper what it's in my head. Another thing is that it has never ending possibilities. I mean, always there are new things to learn and explore. About my particular work, I like to pay attention to every detail. I'm such a perfectionist! In fact, I never feel my illustrations finished, in some way I just stop adding details. I try to make my drawings in a way that inspire happiness. What are your favorite books and websites about illustration? One of the first illustrated books I bought myself was Around the World with Mouk by Marc Boutavant. Another great book is Up Above and Down Below by Paloma Valdivia. The city series "This is..." by Miroslav Sasek. Any book by Oliver Jeffers. "The Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm" with great illustrations, vintage and modern. Any book by Shaun Tan. I especially love "Eric". I check regularly Illustration Mundo, Illustration Served. Another great illustration blog is Pikaland. I also follow great illustrators and I discover new ones in Flickr, Pinterest and Tumblr. Where the magic happens? At my studio at home. Do you think that living in SF helped your career? I have positive thoughts that it will definitely help. I've been living here for 5 months and in this time I had 4 commissions. I've realized in San Francisco illustration is much more appreciated, art and creativity are more valued. Do you think there is a difference between the design community here and in Spain? Is soon to draw conclusions, but for now I've realized that there is more market here in San Francisco and that gives more opportunities. Also there is more public interested in illustration, although increasingly, in Barcelona (I can speak about my city) there are many illustrators, curators, journalists and galleries, a lot of young people, willing to change this situation. Where to find Cristina: Portfolio Flickr Tumblr Behance Facebook Pinterest Etsy