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Water Drop Effect in HTML & CSS

Water Drop Effect in HTML & CSS

The best way to learn anything is by doing it, plain and simple, trial and error. With the explosion of mobile devices and the evolution of HTML5, CSS3 and browsers, knowing to code is almost a requirement to anyone willing to work with web. I have been playing more and more with CSS, trying to create simple things like basic typography styles to more complex ones, like water drop effects. In this post I will show you how to create a simple water drop effect using CSS. The process is quite simple but it will require some basic knowledge of CSS and a little bit of jQuery. Step 1 - Reference First thing to do is to look for references, in this case photos of water drops effects. Google Images is a super useful resource to create mood boards and find inspiration. Step 2 - CSS for the drops Create your simple HTML/CSS boilerplate or download it at http://html5boilerplate.com/. After that start putting together the CSS for the drop. Below you can see the basic code with no color effects. .drops li{ position: absolute; z-index: 100000; display: block; height: 25px; width:25px; margin: 20px auto; border-radius: 50%; background: rgba(255,255,255,.03) -webkit-radial-gradient(center 75%, ellipse contain, #ffffff, rgba(255,255,255,0) 60%); box-shadow: inset 0 0px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.5), inset 0 -1px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.4), inset 0 8px 3px rgba(0,0,0,.3), inset 0 10px 3px rgba(255,255,255,.1), 0 3px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.5); } Step 3 - Water Drop Effect To create the effect we will use "box-shadow" and "background". For the background you can see below that we are using a white at 30% and a radial gradient. With shadow we will create the 3D effect. To do that we will use 3 inset shadows and 1 normal shadow. Below you can see the code. background: rgba(255,255,255,.03) -webkit-radial-gradient(center 75%, ellipse contain, #ffffff, rgba(255,255,255,0) 60%); box-shadow: inset 0 0px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.5), inset 0 -1px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.4), inset 0 8px 3px rgba(0,0,0,.3), inset 0 10px 3px rgba(255,255,255,.1), 0 3px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.5); Step 4 - Basic Javascript with jQuery to create instances To fill the screen with // Number of drops in the screen ndrops = 1000; // Width and Height of the screen wW = $(window).width(); WH = $(window).height(); // Loop for(i=0; i<=ndrops; i++){ // drop dp = "<li class='d" + i + "'></li>" // Ramdon values for X, Y position dX = Math.floor((Math.random()*wW)+1) + "px"; dY = Math.floor((Math.random()*WH)+1) + "px"; // Ramdon values for scale dS = Math.floor((Math.random()*1)+1) * 0.3; // Ramdon values for Opacity, Width and Height dO = (Math.floor((Math.random()*2)+1) * 0.5); dW = "25px" //Math.floor((Math.random()*30)+30) + "px"; dH = Math.floor((Math.random()*20)+18) + "px"; // Append the drops $("ul").append(dp); // Apply the random values $(".d" + i).css("opacity",dO).css("width",dW).css("height",dH).css({x: dX, y:dY, scale: dS}); } CSS body{ background: #666; padding: 0; margin: 0; overflow: hidden; } .bg{ background: #000 url(../img/bg.JPG); background-size: cover; position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; right: 0 bottom:0; width: 100%; height: 100%; z-index: 10; } .drops ul{ position: relative; z-index: 1000; } .drops li{ position: absolute; z-index: 100000; display: block; height: 25px; background: rgba(255,255,255,.03) -webkit-radial-gradient(center 75%, ellipse contain, #ffffff, rgba(255,255,255,0) 60%); margin: 20px auto; border-radius: 50%; box-shadow: inset 0 0px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.5), inset 0 -1px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.6), inset 0 8px 3px rgba(0,0,0,.3), inset 0 10px 3px rgba(255,255,255,.1), 0 3px 6px rgba(0,0,0,.5); } Conclusion You can also animate some of the drops, it would be an extra step but it can be achieve quite easily using CSS animations. The whole idea was to explore the possibilies of CSS to create different effects and water drops effect was one that I had done before in Photoshop, so I thought it would be a good exercise. Now it's up to you not only to play with it but to make it better. Image Click on the image to see the demo HTML for Webkit and Chrome

JWT  Brazil - Made Of What You Are

JWT Brazil - Made Of What You Are

Background Info: this illustration was an A0 billboard produced for JWT Brazil's Troller car campaign. The original brief came attached with a rough concept sketch and some loose directions for what the client wanted to see in the image. The final image was created using 3D objects, stock photos and digital painting. Most of the lighting manipulation used in this image was done with photoshop layer adjustments and painting via a tablet. All 3D objects were created with the software Cinema 4D. Due to scheduling conflicts with the Cannes festival, the deadline for this image was six days. Saad Moosajee, a young self taught freelance Illustrator and Art Director from Denver, Colorado. This work was created for the Slashthree collectives and exhibitions. For more information visit http://www.saadart.com/ Client: Troller Agency: JWT Brazil Art Direction: Thiago Arrighi, Pedro Hefs Illustration: Saad Moosajee Step 1 original background plate is selected for manipulation. The perspective of the floor in the photograph and free flowing branches makes this an ideal image based on the brief provided. Step 2 3D renders are created to be used in the forest environment. The form of the objects are derived from the branches in the photo. The image is also manipulated into various bitmap textures that are applied to the 3D objects. Step 3 The 3D objects are cut up and integrated into the branches of the photograph. The floor of the photo is also extended. Step 4 More 3D objects are integrated into the branches, integration of the animal stocks also begins in addition to color and lighting adjustments. Step 5 3D objects that flow between the car and the humans hands are created. These forms contain loose references to the anatomy of the forest and the animals used in the piece. Numerous bitmap textures are mixed in order to achieve both consistency and variation in the light and color of the objects. Step 6 Further integration of the 3D objects into the environment. Rough placement of the figure and the 3D branches around the figure. Step 7 Continuing to experiment with the lighting and the forests environment. Step 8 Forest background is darkened and desaturated to disguise 3D objects. Foreground branches are developed. Step 9 Recreating the forest atmosphere required balancing dark, mysterious tones against areas of intense illumination. A main source of light was manipulated into the background in an effort to achieve the this effect. Step 10 The light of the composition is adjusted to match the new light source. Step 11 Continuing to adjust light & color of the composition, scale of figure and figures branches is reduced. Step 12 Rough car is placed into image. Step 13 Inside of the car is created via digital painting and 3D manipulation, lighting of car is adjusted to match the composition. Step 14 Color adjustments are made on the composition to give it more warmth, second half of the car is roughly placed. Step 15 More 3D branches and animals are added to the foreground. Step 16 Placement of foreground objects is shifted to be more central. Figure is swapped out by request of the agency Art Directors to someone ethnically brazilian. Manipulation of the ground begins here by roughing in some stock textures. Step 17 Placement of figure is adjusted, overall light of the image is adjusted. Ground is further manipulated with digital painting and cloned textures. Step 18 Quantity of light coming from the back light source is significantly increased to help capture the forest atmosphere. A warm, orange/green tinted light source is used. Step 19 After debating with the art directors regarding about the new figure, a third figure cleared for potential use in the image. The form and light of this new figure felt much more natural in the images environment. Darker lighting is also added to the ground. Step 20 Lighting is once again boosted from the background, this time spreading into the foreground. The texture and perspective of the ground is adjusted to match the original perspective of the floor, and the cars are shifted to a slightly more central position. Step 21 Approval is given for the cars to be colored, which proved to be a key aspect of this illustration. The cars are digitally painted to have a color that aligns with the hue of the main light source, giving the image a more unified aesthetic. Conclusion Final lighting adjustments and sharpening. Movie

Vintage Stencil Style in Photoshop

Vintage Stencil Style in Photoshop

Last week we posted a tutorial showing how to create simple artwork in Illustrator and then in Photoshop we added a few effects to make it look old and with that vintage/hipster feel. Some people asked about some of the steps in Photoshop so I decided to make a simple walkthrough about how to use Photoshop to create this kind of effect. It's a simple technique but it can be very handy for this kind of artwork. So in this tutorial I will show you how to create a simple vintage look stencil in Photoshop. The whole process will take around one hour and you won't need anything special besides time and a few dirty brushes. Step 1 Create the artwork you want to apply the effect. I used Adobe Illustrator to create this simple stencil. Step 2 In Photoshop now, place the stencil. Add a new layer and fill it with black, that will be the background. With layer style, apply a white Color Overlay in the stencil. Step 3 Group the black layer with the white stencil and convert it to a smart object. Filter>Convert to Smart Filters. Apply a Gaussian Blur, go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur. Use 4 pixels for the Radius. Step 4 Go to Layer>New Adjustment Layer>Levels. Change the values until you cannot see the blur effect anymore. After that make sure that the Adjustment Layer is clipped to the layer (Layer>Create Clipping Mask). Step 5 Create a new layer on top of the stencil and then with a regular dirty brush add some of the texture. Step 6 Group the stencil layer with the brush layer and then change the Blend Mode of the folder to Lighter Color. Also add an image for the background. Step 7 My image looks really bright and doesn't create enough contrast with the logo. So go to Image>Adustments>Hue and Saturation. Reduce the Saturation a little bit and also the Lightness. The values will depend on the image you will be using. Step 8 Go to Image>Adjustments>Levels. Change the Output Values and also the grey Input value to make the image much darker. Step 9 Now go to Layer>New Adjustment Layer>Photo Filter. Use the Warming Filter at 65% Density. Step 10 Convert the folder with the stencil and the brush effect to a smart filter. Go to Filter>Filter Gallery>Brush Strokes>Accented Edges. Play with the values until you have an effect that looks natural. Conclusion Reduce the opacity of the logo to 95% depending on the background. You can also use levels to make it not so bright besides that, the design is pretty much done. I believe this little step by step might help those that were having some difficults during the last tutorial. Now it's up to you, have fun and a great 2014 to you all. Download Photoshop file Click here to download the Photoshop file used for this tutorial

Abduzeedo Happy Holidays Art in Illustrator and Photoshop

Abduzeedo Happy Holidays Art in Illustrator and Photoshop

One of the best ways to learn is by practicing and trying to recreate styles and effects that you like. We have been doing this here on Abduzeedo since the beginning, always adapting a little bit to add our own unique flavor. The goal is to learn the details behind a style or composition so we can apply some of that to our future work. I've been seeing quite a few logos using this style so what we'll show you today is how to create a logo, Abduzeedo just seemed natural, using Illustrator and then Photoshop. So, for this tutorial I will show you how to create a simple vector mark using Illustrator and then we'll add some effects in Photoshop. Step 1 Open Illustrator and with the Line Segment Tool create a vertical line. Copy and paste in place and rotate it 90º. Copy the 2 lines, group them and rotate 90º again. Step 2 Select the lines and rotate 33º Step 3 Duplicate and rotate the segments until you have something like the image below. Step 4 Select some segmentes and then start resizing them so you have different sizes for the lines The the first set will be the bigger and from there one you make them a bit smaller. Step 5 Add your logo in the center using a big white stroke. Also increase the stroke size of the lines to 8pt. Step 8 Selet the symbol and copy it. Go to Object>Expand. Make sure that the stroke is now a fill path. Then go to Window>Pathfinder and Unite the symbols. Select all lines and the symbol and in Pathfinder select Outline. The idea is to delete the area where the symbol and the lines overlap. Paste the symbol again. Step 9 Create a circle and aline in the center of your logo. We will use that for reference for your text. Step 10 Add your text and then repeat the same thing as the step 9 to make the gap on the area tha the text will be visible. Step 11 Create a black background and then place the logo in the center with white colors. Step 12 In Photoshop now, first use a brush to create the grungy effect. Step 13 Make sure you have a black backgroud and your logo over it. Merge the 2 layers and then go to Filter>Filter Gallery>Brush Strokes>Spatter. Use 1 for the Spray Radius and 12 for Smoothness. The idea of this step is to make the for less uniform. Conclusion Now just add your background and your image is done. I hope you enjoy this little case study/tutorial and have a great holidays. The background image is titled Background of snow flurry falling at night with motion blur by Elena Elisseeva, courtesy for Shutterstock Download Photoshop file Click here to download the Photoshop file used for this tutorial

Working with Type in Photoshop

Working with Type in Photoshop

In this post I'm going to show you some of the tools that I use in my workflow when working with type in Photoshop. Anti-Aliasing The elephant in the room seems to be as good of a place as any to start this post. In previous versions of Photoshop (pre-CS6) selecting the type of anti-aliasing method to use came down to choosing the best from a bad bunch really. However, a few months ago Adobe introduced two new OS-native options in the anti-aliasing settings in Photoshop: “Mac” and “Mac LCD”. These options aim to replicate the system anti-aliasing for fonts: “Mac” replicating OS X’s greyscale font smoothing and “Mac LCD” its sub-pixel font smoothing. For web designers, the CSS equivalent to “Mac” would be: `-webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased` and the equivalent of “Mac LCD”: `-webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased` As iOS uses greyscale anti-aliasing for all of its type rendering, you should use the “Mac” anti-aliasing method in Photoshop when designing for iOS devices. Character and Paragraph styles Character and Paragraph style panels shipped with CS6 and allow you to save the attributes you've set for a specific text layer to then re-apply the exact same styling to other layers. To display the panels, go to Window > Character/Paragraph Styles in the main Photoshop window. I find this feature very useful for keeping all of my typography consistent throughout a project. If you are unfamiliar with this feature, Tuts+ have a handy getting started video on their site. Wrap text with paths I only really use this when doing web design but it’s still good to know about. If you want to wrap text around an image then you can do so fairly easily with vector paths. Make sure to have a look at this [video tutorial from “Method and Craft”](http://methodandcraft.com/videos/shaping-textfields-in-photoshop) if you're unsure how to achieve this. In essence: draw the shape you want your text to be wrapped within then pick the type tool. Click on the shape you just created and the text layer’s bounds will be wrapped around the shape. Check out the end result below: Filter Text Layers This is a fairly well known feature in Photoshop but I still find it useful. At the top of the layers panel there are various filtering methods including “Filter for Type Layers”. Activate this to only show text layers in the panel. It can be handy for making bulk changes to a project. Paste Lorem Ipsum Another useful little time saver that shipped with CS6 is the ability to paste *Lorem Ipsum* text into your document from within Photoshop. When editing a text layer, go to Type > Paste Lorem Ipsum in the main menu to paste a paragraph of dummy text. I would recommend assigning a keyboard shortcut to this to make it even quicker. Font Management I use OS X’s built-in Font Book to manage the 269 fonts I currently have installed on my system. I have tried a lot different 3rd party font management applications in the past but they always ended up breaking something and felt unnecessary for the few fonts that I actually use. There we have it. These are some of the things I do when working with type in Photoshop to improve my workflow. Hopefully you found this post useful! Let me know if there are any other aspects of Photoshop you would like me to talk about in further blog posts, on Twitter. The original version of this article was published on the Realmac Software blog Elliot Jackson is a Designer at Realmac Software, a small, award-winning independent iOS and OS X development studio behind Clear, Ember and Rapidweaver

Abduzeedo 7th Anniversary Poster in Photoshop

Abduzeedo 7th Anniversary Poster in Photoshop

This December Abduzeedo celebrates its 7th anniversary. In the end of 2006, after the robbery of our design studio, I decided to start a simple blog to share inspiration, experiments and to try to be more active in the community. Today, after 7 years, we have met so many amazing people but most importantly, we have learned so much together with everyone that visits the site. To celebrate the anniversary I created an image to illustrate our journey, a simple idea acknowledging how time flies. We must take action right now because the little we do can, in a gentle way, shake the world. So in this tutorial I will show you the creative process behind the poster. It's a simply walkthrough using Photoshop. Step 1 Create a new document and import a photo of clouds or something almost abstract. The photo I am using is courtesy of Shutterstock and it's titled "a photo of sunset above clouds from airplane window" by menz11stock. Step 2 With the Rectangle Tool U create a square and then with the Direct Select Tool A, select the shape. With the Pen Tool P, delete one of the points to create a triangle. Use the image below for reference. Step 3 Go to Layer>Layer Style>Gradient Overlay. Use Black and White for the color, Linear Dodge for the Blend Mode and 99º for the Angle. Step 4 Change the Opacity to 20%. Step 5 Create another triangle like the previous steps using pretty much the same Layer Styles. Step 6 Invert the gradient of the layer style and use Overlay for the Blend Mode. Also use 50% for the Opacity of this layer. Step 7 Add the third triangle and make sure they are equally spaced. The first triangle in the left will be light, the center will be light and the one in the right will be dark. Step 8 Create a vignette effect using a layer with a simple layer filled with black and a cirlce brush paint in white using the Brush Tool B. Change the Blend Mode to Multiply. Step 9 Create a simple highlight behind the triangle on the right. To do that you just need to create a new layer and use the triangle to create a mask. Then just paint with the Brush Tool B and white color. Repeat the same thing to create a darker area behind the first triangle (the one on the left). Step 10 Add the text you want. In my case I used a quote by Mahatma Gandhi. I also align the Abduzeedo symbol with the the junction of intersection of the triangles. Conclusion The end result is simple an quite beautiful especially with such a straightforward process that it required. The idea behind this image was to illustrate the sense of how time flies, it seems that it was yesterday that we started Abduzeedo and this month we celebrate 7 years sharing inspiration. I hope you enjoy this little tutorial and thanks for visiting the blog.

Basic Animations in CSS and Javascript for Prototypes

Basic Animations in CSS and Javascript for Prototypes

Motion design is getting more important everyday when it comes to design interfaces that engage with the user both functionally and emotionally. Because of this, I started practicing with Javascript and jQuery to create basic animations for my prototypes. One of the most common animations comes into play when you want to build a list or animate items in a chain. To illustrate that today I share a simple technique I use for my prototypes. For this little tutorial we will play with some HTML, CSS and Javascript. The whole process won't take more than 30 minutes. Step 1 Start a new HTML document and add some elements, one "Section" and then a list "UL" with a few objects "LI" <!doctype html> <html> <head> <title></title> <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, minimum-scale=1.0"> </head> <body> <section> <ul> <li>1</li> <li>2</li> <li>3</li> <li>4</li> <li>6</li> <li>7</li> <li>8</li> </ul> </section> </body> </html> Step 2 Now lets import jQuery and jQuery Transit plugin to help us animate the list. <!doctype html> <html> <head> <title></title> <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, minimum-scale=1.0"> <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.10.1.min.js"></script> <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-migrate-1.2.1.min.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ricostacruz.com/jquery.transit/jquery.transit.min.js" ></script> <style> body{ padding: 0; margin: 0; background: #000; } section{ max-width: 1024px; min-height: 960px; background: url(http://wpuploads.appadvice.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/24.png) center center; background-size: cover; margin: 0 auto; } ul, ul li{ margin:0; padding: 0; list-style-type: none; } ul { padding-top: 40px; } ul li{ background: #fff; margin: 0 11px 1px 11px; padding: 15px; } </style> </head> <body> <section> <ul> <li>1</li> <li>2</li> <li>3</li> <li>4</li> <li>6</li> <li>7</li> <li>8</li> </ul> </section> </body> </html> Step 3 - Animating the list To animate the list is pretty simple, the first and most important thing to do is to have a little script of what you want to animate. In this first case we will animate one LI at the time fading in and sliding down from the top. <script> $(function(){ $("ul li").each(function(i){ $(this).css({y:"-30px", opacity:0}).transition({y:"0", opacity:1, delay:200 * i},600,"ease"); }) }) </script> So what we are doing in that function is to find each "LI"strong> and then for each one we will set with CSS to move them "-30px"strong> in the Y axis (top) and change the opacity to 0. After that with jQuery Transition we will move it back to the original position. To make sure each one move at different time we will set a delay to 200 and multiply that by "i" (each element have their unique "i"). Step 4 - some 3D rotations <script> $(function(){ $("ul li").css({opacity:0}).each(function(i){ $(this).css({y:"150px", rotateX: "90deg", transformOrigin: 'center top'}).transition({perspective: '400px',y:"0", opacity:1, rotateX:"0deg", delay:200 * i},300, "ease"); }) }) </script> The only thing we added here was the rotateX and transformOrigin for the CSS and perspective and rotateX for the transition. You can play with these values to change the animation as well. Conclusion Below you can see a basic example of what you can do with simple Javascript. The best thing about these animations is that they use the GPU, that means they run very smooth in mobile devices and are perfect for mobile prototypes.   See the Pen uqnjH by Fabio Sasso (@abduzeedo) on CodePen  

A Guide to Pixel Hinting

A Guide to Pixel Hinting

When looking at a website or interface, there are few things more annoying than half pixels. The resulting blurred edges make your potentially great product look hastily designed, uncared for and unfinished. Admittedly, if you are working with company logos, especially type-based ones, half pixels are a fairly regular occurrence and potentially frustrating to deal with. When it comes to icons, buttons or any other interface elements however there are no excuses. So, today I thought I’d share some tips on Pixel Hinting - which very simply means moving your vector points so that they fall on the pixel grid. Dealing with type logos If you are working with a non-vector logo, you’re going to have to redraw it to be able to get the best, pixel-perfect results. For this example however, we already have a vector ready to go in Photoshop. Download example.psd As with any vector adjustment work, your best friends are going to be the Path and Direct Selection Tools as well as 3200% zoom. The actual process for doing this is very simple but depending on the size of the vector, it can get quite time consuming. Tip: When using the Selection Tools, CMD+Click to quickly switch between the two. Getting set up Make sure that the “Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid” option is deselected in your Photoshop preferences (Cmd+K). This will allow us to move our vector point in increments rather than 1px at a time. Let’s get started As this is a fairly repetitive process, we’re just going to fix the “R” here. It doesn’t have very good edges at the moment so should make for a good example. You will then be able to apply what you’ve learnt to the rest of the shapes. Here is the before and after of our example logo. As you can see, when we’re done pixel-hinting it we’ll have a much crisper, better looking shape. Now let’s get started. This is the “R” zoomed up to 3200%. I like to begin at the top of a shape and work down. As you can see, the top part isn’t too bad here. We’ll just nudge it up a little. Make sure you select all of the appropriate anchor points with the Direct Selection Tool. Next we’ll fix the left side. Start by nudging in the top two anchor points then the second two out. The bottom part isn’t too complicated either, just make sure you’re selecting the correct anchor points. Finish up the outer part of the shape by bringing the last few points. Now for the inner section. Nudge in the left anchor points then nudge out the right ones. And we’re done! As you can see, it’s a very simple process that produces good results. Not all shapes are as straight forward as this one though. There are times when you might have to compromise and use a half pixel to keep the recognisable features of the shape intact but as a general rule, pixel hint! Dealing with icons Using icon sets is fine for quick mockups, but for final releases you should always make custom icons. I don’t pixel hint in quick mockups because they serve only to get your ideas out there and your time can be much better spent elsewhere. However, when the time comes to do your final icons here are a couple of tips: Setup: I like to do icons in a separate PSD. Start by setting your background to #ffffff if it isn’t already and your vector colour to #000000. Black on white is the easiest way to spot those half pixels. Know your dimensions: If your icons are going to be displayed at 32x32, there’s no point in making them at 46x46 or any other dimensions. Setup some guides in your new PSD and design for the size they’re going to be displayed at. I hope you found this article helpful, and be sure to let me know on [Twitter](http://twitter.com/ElliotEKJ) if there are any other Photoshop topics you’d like me to cover in future posts The original version of this article was published on the Realmac Software blog. Guest Author Elliot Jackson (http://twitter.com/ElliotEKJ) is a designer at Realmac Software, a small, award-winning independent iOS and OS X development studio behind Clear, Ember and Rapidweaver

Abstract Artwork in PIxelmator

Abstract Artwork in Pixelmator

This weekend I was waiting for my flight sitting at the airport with no internet and decided to create a new wallpaper for Abduzeedo. I started in Photoshop, but then I decided to play a little bit with Pixelmator. After 1 hour and lots of experimenting the final result looked really nice and that's what I want to share with you in this tutorial. So in this tutorial I will show you how to create an abstract image using Pixelmator. The process is super simple and it won't take more than 30 minutes for you to achieve the same result. Step 1 Open Pixelmator and create a new document, I am using 2880x1800 pixels for the dimensions. Step 2 Fill the background layer with black, and then add a new layer. Fill it with black as well and the go to the Effects Panel and select Light Leaks. Step 3 Select Nebula for the Light Leak. Step 4 Increase the size of the effect by moving the controllers Step 5 Back to the Effects panel, select the Tiles option. Then select Bug Eye. Move the center point up a little bit. You can also play with the values to change the preset the way you think will look better. Conclusion This technique is super simple but you can put together a really nice wallpaper, it works really well with photos and others colorful background colors. Now it's up to you, just experiment and have fun.

Super Easy Soft Shadows in Illustrator

Super Easy Soft Shadows in Illustrator

We all know that hyperrealist icons are over, the new trend now is flat and either hard shadows or super soft and subtle ones. You can also try to mix both styles, there are a lot of people actually doing that and the results are quite beautiful. With that in mind I decided to give it a try in Illustrator and recreate this effect. So in this tutorial I will show you how to create a simple soft shadow effect uing the Blend Tool in Illustrator. We will also use the 3D features to create some sublte 3D effects. Step 1 Open Illustrator and create a new document. Select the logo or symbol you want to apply the effect. I am using the Abduzeedo symbol. Step 2 Select the black outer circle and then go to Effect>3D>Extrude & Bevel. Use Front of the Position, 50pt for the Extrude & Bevel, 20pt for the Height and classic for the Bevel type. Also select the inner bevel option. For the Lighting use the values in the image below. Step 3 Repeat the same process for the symbol. You will have to change some values depending on the complexity of the symbol you will be using. Step 4 To create the shadows we will use the Blend Tool (W). So copy the symbol and paste in the same place. After that duplicate the symbol and move it down and left. Change the opacity of the symbols, one to 50% and the other one to 0%. Also use multiply for the transparency mode. Click on both symbols with the Blend Tool to create the blend. Change the Specified Distance to 3pt. Step 5 Repeat the same thing to other elements. Conclusion Create a rectangle to use as a background, then create another soft shadow using the Blend Tool again. Your design will look like the image below. The whole process is quite simple but the result is quite elegant and if you want to be reproduce this effect I believe Illustrator might be the best tool for that. Now it's up to you, time to have some fun! Download Illustrator file  

Case Studies: AWAKE, Freed to kill and Gateway to hell

Case Studies: Awake, Freed to Kill and Gateway to Hell

October is Halloween's month and for this week's case study we will feature not one but three inspiring digital artworks by Wojciech Magierski that will definitely give you some inspiration and references for your Halloween design. Wojciech Magierski an illustrator and digital artist with a degree from Cracow Academy in Applied Graphics. Born in 1983, Magierski lives and works in Cracow (Poland). His main focus is on digital illustrations, photo manipulation and broadly defined “design”. With 7 years experience in the industry, Magierski brings a unique style and exceptional techniques and has been appreciated by various international graphic magazines. His designs and illustrations were published on front pages of UK Advanced Photoshop Magazine, Computer Arts Magazine and Practical Photoshop Magazine in Poland. AWAKE This image was created for slashthree NEW ERA BOOK, presented at OFFF Festival in Barcelona. Freed to kill This is the first illustration made for Goverdose Collective from Poland. The theme of the artpack was "I kill you". Gateway to hell This is the second illustration made for Goverdose Collective from Poland. The theme of the artpack was "I kill you". For more information visit http://www.magierski.pl/

iOS7 Frosted Glass Effect with HTML 5 and Javascript

iOS7 Frosted Glass Effect with HTML 5 and Javascript

With iOS7 Apple introduced a completely new design for the 6 year old OS. Among all the changes, one that really caught everyone's attention was the blurred background effect. Basically some parts of the UI get a nice frosted glass effect. There are a couple of ways to achieve this effect using HTML and CSS. The easiest way is to use CSS filters, however the performance on phones is far from usable. With that in mind I decided to experiment with Canvas and the result was quite good. So in this post I want to share a little bit about the idea behind this prototype. Basic workflow What we want to accomplish here is a simple way to blur the content once it goes underneath a part of the UI. For this prototype we will use an action bar, or header. To do that in HTML we will have to use a little bit of Javascript. Basically what we want to do is: Render the HTML Duplicate the content area and convert it to canvas. Move the Canvas to the Header part Sync the scroll of the content with the canvas in the header Basic code   See the Pen eJlfj by Fabio Sasso (@abduzeedo) on CodePen Javascript To convert the content area from HTML to Canvas I used a library called html2canvas (http://html2canvas.hertzen.com/). It's pretty simple to use if you follow the steps in the documentation: html2canvas(element, { onrendered: function(canvas) { // canvas is the final rendered <canvas> element } }); After the Canvas is rendered I then move it to the Header. I also added an ID so I can play with it in CSS and apply the blur effect in the future. html2canvas($("body"), { onrendered: function(canvas) { $(".blurheader").append(canvas); $("canvas").attr("id","canvas"); } }); Blur Effect To apply the blur, I used another library for that, it's called Stackblur and it applies Gaussian Blur to a canvas element. html2canvas($("body"), { onrendered: function(canvas) { $(".blurheader").append(canvas); $("canvas").attr("id","canvas"); stackBlurCanvasRGB('canvas', 0, 0, $("canvas").width(), $("canvas").height(), 20); } }); Conclusion The end result works pretty well for a simple iOS7 prototype. I am still working on fixing the issues with the scrolling, iOS doesn't have "on scroll event" which complicates things a little bit. Below you can see a demo of the prototype. You can fork it on GitHub (https://github.com/abduzeedo/ios7-blur-html5) and make it better :)    

Vector Breaking Bad RV in Illustrator

Vector Breaking Bad RV in Illustrator

Last week we posted about some new trends in icon design and illustration. Today after spending hours watching Breaking Bad, I started to watch it a couple of weeks ago and now I am on season 5 already - I decided to create an illustration for a desktop wallpaper for my laptop and of course share with you the process in Illustrator. So in this case study/tutorial I will show you how to create an illustration inspired by Breaking Bad. Step 1 Start with the basic shapes and outlines. Use the Stylize>Round Corners to create the rounded shapes for doors, windows and the RV itself. Step 2 Once you have the basic shapes, make the outlines of the RV much thicker than the rest. Also play with different strok weights. Step 3 Keep adding more details. Step 4 Time to add some colors. Let's add the basic stripes first. Also the wheels and the bullet holes in the door. Step 5 Use a beige color for the RV. Step 6 Use the Blend Tool to create the metal texture of the RV. Step 7 Here's the basic vector. Conclusion Just add a nice blue for the background and the logo to finish this simple piece. There's nothing new but it's nice to play with Illustrator after having fun watching Breaking Bad. Download the Illustrator files Download the vector file used for this tutorial

Dramatic Shadows in Photoshop CC

Dramatic Shadows in Photoshop CC

It has been quite a long time I've been thinking about creating a design with those very realistic shadows. This weekend I decided to give it a try. I started to think about what would be the best way, manually recreating that would be too much work. So I decided to try the 3D capabilities of Photoshop. It turned out to be the easiest and quickest way. The result was also very good. So in this tutorial I will show you how to create a design with beautiful and dramatic shadows using the 3D in Photoshop CC. The process is very straightforward and it will take you less than 1 hour to achieve the same result. Step 1 Open Photoshop and create a new document, I used 2880x1800 pixels for the size. After that add some letters or the text you want to apply the shadow. I used "ABDZ" using Futura Medium for the font. Step 2 Go to 3D>New 3D Extrusion from Selected Layer. Then select the 3D layer. In the 3D panel select the Extrusion layer and then start editing the properties. Step 3 For the Extrusion Depth use 300. Also Rotate the object so you can use the Top view. Step 4 For the Cap, use 100% Width with Contour and 45º for the Angle. For the Bevel use 45º too. Step 5 Select the Infinite Light and rotate it a little bit. In the Properties, use 1000 for the Intensity and 75% for the Softness. Then go to 3D>Render. Step 6 After a few minutes this would be the result you will get. If you are not happy with the results, change the extrusion and the light source. Also, make sure that the object is right on the floor. Step 7 Add a layer underneath all the other layers and fill it with a Pattern. I used one from Subtlepatterns.com Step 8 Add some more elements just to fill the canvas and to create a nice composition. Step 9 Import a paper texture. I used an old paper texture that I found on Google Images. Step 10 Change the blending mode of the texture to Lighten at 50%. Conclusion Select all layers and then merge them into one. Change the Blend Mode of the merged layer to Multiply and your composition will be done. Photoshop CC has improved the 3D features quite a bit and it's way faster to experiment, especially if you want to create this type of effect. Now it's up to you, have fun! Download Photoshop File Download the Photoshop file used for this tutorial

Pixel Art in Illustrator

Pixel Art in Illustrator

I am huge fan of pixel art, I even dabbled with the form in 2004, however after my studio got robbed, I lost my backup disks including my pixel work and I've never tried it again. As of late, I've been following the work of Alex Griendling and some of his amazing pixel arts. Inspired by that I decided to give it a try though I streamlined the process a little bit just to make my life a bit easier in Illustrator. So in this tutorial I will show you how to create a nice pixel art from an existing photo, in my case, the great Mohammed Ali. We will use Illustrator for most of the tutorial and I have to say, the whole process will take quite a few hours so be sure to find your patience. Step 1 The first step is to find the image that you want to pixelate. I am using one from Neil Leifer of Muhammad Ali, you can find it at http://abduzeedo.com/inspiring-photography-muhammad-ali-neil-leifer Step 2 There are lots of ways to pixelate a bitmap. It's nice but it's not scaleable as a vector. One of my favorite tools for that is Pixelmator. So I open the image in Pixelmator and then using the Pixelate tool, I used 20px for the scale. That means that each pixel will be 20px; Step 3 Open the image in Illustrator and now it's time to recreate the image in vector. The first thing to do is to create the basic pixel, in my case a 20x20 square. Duplicate the square to create the grid then. Step 4 With the Blend Tool, use 20pt for the Specified Distance to start creating the rows. Step 5 After that start duplicating the rows. Once you have a grid you can then just picl the colors using the Eyedropper Tool (I); Step 6 Now go to Illustrator's preferences and change the Guids&Grid preferences to show a gridline every 20pt, and 1 Subdivision. Step 7 Here's an example of the beginning of the illustration with the grid visible. Step 8 After an arduous and time consuming task, you will have a beautiful vector object, ready to do whatever you want. Conclusion After editing and adjusting you can create your own layout using the pixel art. I am a huge fan of the style and love the work of some people do with it, however I am not that talented and need to use a tool to pixelate for me first. The result is really cool, but the time necessary to achieve it is quite long.

Geometric Pattern in Illustrator

Geometric Pattern in Illustrator

Last weekend I was playing in Illustrator trying to create a simple wallpaper to use on my phone and tablet. I love geometric patterns, but I hadn't done anything like that in a while. So, I started playing with some ideas inspired by Andy Gilmore. It's really nice to see how the Pattern Tool in Illustrator facilitates the process of creating patterns these days. So in this tutorial I will show how to create a simple pattern in Illustrator. The process is pretty straightforward, but I believe it will be really useful when you need to create vector patterns for your projects. Step 1 Create a new document in Illustrator and then with the Rectangle Tool (M) create a square. Step 2 Rotate the square 45 degrees. Step 3 Delete the bottom part in order to create a triangle. Step 4 Duplicate the triangle and flip it vertically, align them so they are on top of each other. After that selecte the 2 triangles, copy and paste them in place. Rotate the copies so you create a square again with different colors for each triangle. Step 5 Create a set of squares rotating them so the colors of the triangles are on different places. You can make 2 or 3 rows. Step 6 Select the set you created on the previous step and go to Object>Pattern>Make. Add a name for your pattern and play with the options. After that you will have a new pattern in your Swatches pallet. Step 7 Create a new artboard. I am using 2880x1800 pixels for a desktop wallpaper. After that select the pattern you created in the previous step. Step 8 Add a new rectangle using a dark blue (#294156) for the color. Step 9 Change the Transparency mode to Color Burn at 40%. Step 10 Duplicate the rectangle to make the color a bit more intense. Step 11 Duplicate the rectangle again and this time use a green (#3D7F39) for the color. Step 12 Create a line crossing the artboard. Use white for the stroke color. Step 13 Move the line to the left, make sure it align with the bottom square, then duplicate the line and align it with the top right square. After that with the Blend Tool, select both lines and try to find the exact number of steps to match your pattern. Step 14 Repeate the same steps to create more lines matching the pattern. Conclusion Add the logo in the center of your artboard using a circle to break the pattern flow a little bit. After that your wallpaper will be done. I did that last weekend and I have been using this wallpaper on my computers and tablets since then. I really like the color and the flow, however you can try a version without the white lines if you want it something more subtle. Download Illustrator file Download the Illustrator file used for this tutorial

Playing with Masks in Pixelmator

Playing with Masks in Pixelmator

It's been quite a long time since the last time I posted a Pixelmator tutorial. I've been using Pixelmator more and more for my daily blog activities like simple and fast image editing. The tool is so fast and with the new version you will be able to do pretty much anything you want. I've been also experimenting with the tool and having a lot of fun. Today I want to share one of these experiments. So in this tutorial I will show you how to create a simple artwork mixing typography and images. Step 1 Open Pixelmator and create a new document. I am using the A4 preset. Step 2 With the Type Tool (T), add one layer with a very big P and another layer with a much smaller text "ixelmator". The font I am using is the Myriad Pro. Step 3 Type to import a image to use for our photo montage. The one I am using is courtesy of Shutterstock and it's titled "Cliche tree on hill with beautiful blue sky background in black and white" by Matt Gibson. Step 4 Create a marquee selection using the big P then mask the image so you have the P and the tree blended. Step 5 With the Brush Tool (B) start refining the edges so the branches are not just the mask cutout. It's important to keep the shape of the P visible, so be very careful on this step. Step 6 Make the ground part of the image visible. Keep using the Brush Tool to edit the mask. Step 7 Make the trunk of the tree a little bit wider. Step 8 Make half of the page black and move the composition up. Also add some more text o finish the composition. Conclusion This is a little tutorial showing how to play with masks and text in Pixelmator to create a sort of double exposure effect in a way. The whole process is pretty starightfoward and you won't take more than 45 minutes to do an effect like that. Now it's up to you :) Download Pixelmator file Download the Pixelmator file used for this tutorial.