One of the things that I like the most when visiting a new city is to check out the museums, not exactly because of the expositions or arts that they hold inside but to appreciate the architecture of the buildings, that for me is a truly masterpiece. Usually these constructions are the must see spots of their towns. Emblematic because of their forms these buildings bring with them the very own and unique characteristics of their architects.

In this post I will pay homage to these fantastic buildings and start a series of posts about Museums, the most famous and created by the most important architects in the history. We're sure that you will love them.

"A museum is a building or institution which houses a collection of artifacts. Museums collect and care for objects of scientific, artistic, or historical importance and make them available for public viewing through exhibits that may be permanent or temporary. Most large museums are located in major cities throughout the world and more local ones exist in smaller cities, towns and even the countryside. (via Wikipedia)"

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

1959, by Frank Lloyd Wright - guggenheim.org

"Somebody said the museum out here on Fifth Avenue looked like a washing machine," Wright said. "Well, I've heard a lot of that type of reaction, and I've always discounted it as worthless, and I think it is."

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

The Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany

2001, by Daniel Libeskind - juedisches-museum-berlin.de

The two-story, three-winged house is built around a square courtyard to which a glass roof designed by Daniel Libeskind was added in 2007. The façade of the Old Building has a central projection; the triangular gable over the portal is decorated with the Prussian national coat of arms flanked by the allegorical figures for wisdom and justice – a lasting trace of the function the building originally served. Visitors to the Jewish Museum Berlin pass through this main portal.

The Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany

The Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany

The Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany

The Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany

The Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany

The Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA)

1995, by Mario Botta - sfmoma.org

The situation of the museum building on a plot surrounded by a three high-rise blocks encouraged the adoption of a particularly powerful image, while at the same time avoiding and direct-and inevitably disadvantageous - comparison with its surroundings.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA)

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA)

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA)

Centre Pompidou, Paris

1971-1977: Centre Pompidou by Richard Rogers & Renzo Piano - centrepompidou.fr

The supporting structure and movement and flow systems, such as the escalators, were relegated to the outside of the building, thereby freeing up interior space for museum and activity areas. Colour-coded ducts are attached to the building's west façade, as a kind of wrapping for the structure: blue for air, green for fluids, yellow for electricity cables and red for movement and flow.

Centre Pompidou, Paris

Centre Pompidou, Paris

Centre Pompidou, Paris

Centre Pompidou, Paris

Museu de Arte Contemporânea (MAC), Niterói - Rio de Janeiro

1996, by Oscar Niemeyer - macniteroi.com.br

"How to explain this project! I remember when I went to see the site. The sea, the mountains of Rio, a beautiful landscape that I should preserve. And I went with the building, taking the shape of which, in my view, the space required . The study was done, and a ramp leading visitors to the museum completed my project. (via Google Translate)"

Museu de Arte Contemporânea (MAC), Niterói - Rio de Janeiro

Museu de Arte Contemporânea (MAC), Niterói - Rio de Janeiro

Museu de Arte Contemporânea (MAC), Niterói - Rio de Janeiro

Museu de Arte Contemporânea (MAC), Niterói - Rio de Janeiro

Museu de Arte Contemporânea (MAC), Niterói - Rio de Janeiro

The Louvre, Paris

1546-1878, by Pierre Lescot | 1989, by Ieoh Ming Pei - louvre.fr

The Louvre, in its successive architectural metamorphoses, has dominated central Paris since the late 12th century. Built on the city's western edge, the original structure was gradually engulfed as the city grew. The dark fortress of the early days was transformed into the modernized dwelling of François I and, later, the sumptuous palace of the Sun King, Louis XIV.

The Louvre, Paris

The Louvre, Paris

The Louvre, Paris

The Louvre, Paris

The Louvre, Paris

Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, UK

1977,by Sir Norman Foster - scva.org.uk

The Sainsbury Centre brought a new level of refinement to the practice’s early explorations into lightweight, flexible structures. Much more than a traditional gallery, it integrates spaces for viewing art, and facilities for recreation, teaching and research, within a single, light-filled space that opens up to views of the surrounding landscape.

Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, UK

Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, UK

Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, UK

Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, UK

Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, UK

East Wing, National Gallery in Washington DC

1978, by Ieoh Ming Pei - nga.gov

The skylit atrium at the heart of the East Wing is a hub of circulation and orientation. Organized around it are three flexible towers designed to permit the exhibition of one large or multiple small shows with the viewing intimacy of a small house museum. The new and old buildings are functionally united into an integrated whole by an underground tunnel animated by prismatic skylights, a chadar waterwall, and by a wide range of dining and other services.

East Wing, National Gallery in Washington DC

East Wing, National Gallery in Washington DC

East Wing, National Gallery in Washington DC

East Wing, National Gallery in Washington DC

East Wing, National Gallery in Washington DC

East Wing, National Gallery in Washington DC

The Tate Modern, London Bankside, UK

1998-2000: By Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron - tate.org.uk/modern/

Tate Modern has transformed a previously underdeveloped area of London and has helped give the city a new image as a leading centre of contemporary culture. It has become a key landmark for London, while its programme and architecture have won international acclaim.

The Tate Modern, London Bankside, UK

The Tate Modern, London Bankside, UK

The Tate Modern, London Bankside, UK

The Tate Modern, London Bankside, UK

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

1997: By Frank Gehry - guggenheim-bilbao.es

Volumes and perspectives, sinuous titanium curves, dazzling light and colour ... An combination of elements that create a unique exhibition space for each gallery. Art and architecture join hands in a truly unique museum experience.

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain

About the author of this post

I’m a UX / Web designer and manage business and projects at Zee. Also I love to spend some hours on our main projects Openjobs and as a writer and contributor here on Abduzeedo..

Also, you can take a look on my personal website.