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"Explore" Photo Illustration Case Study

"Explore" Photo Illustration Case Study

Explore is a visual adventurous nature created from scratch with studio photos, regular make up and a lot of awesome cgi. Take a look at this awesome project by the guys at Striker Digital. Visual of an adventurous nature we created for an untypical travel agency. We handled and created whole process from photoshoot to CGI and post-production. Special thanks goes to stylist and make-up artist who created amazingly believable costumes including realistic wounds, sweat and blood effects. For more from Striker Digital visit striker-pictures.com. Details Process

Case Study - Wordpress Theme Design

Case Study - Wordpress Theme Design

If you are a web designer and use wordpress a lot, you will provably enjoy this case study in whichI will show the design process I took to design a Wordpress theme. Enjoy! A few months ago I was approached by Slocum Themes with the challenge to design a Wordpress Theme for bloggers. The idea was to create a simple and effective theme, with all the default features Wordpress has to offer. I decided to get my inspiration from social media. After all, social media updates can be considered as micro blogging. I did some research on how social media platforms such as facebook, twitter, google plus, and pinterest display their posts, specially the posts with photos, and that's how Socialize was born. Design Process My first step is to always wireframe on paper and design on Photoshop before I get to the coding. In the case of a wordpress theme I could list all the components and elements of the site, so I decided to go with the basic wordpress blog style (Header, Body, Sidebar, Footer) and didn't need to do much wireframing. Instead I wanted to create a style guide, so broke everything down and designed each component at a time, keeping an overall consistency on the design. I only put everything together once all the components were done, instead of taking the usual approach where I would first design the homepage than inner page, I wanted to create a solid design guide that could be used on all pages. Post Component With that in mind, I figure that my focus should be on the most important element of a blog, the "Post Component" and how it's displayed on the homepage to engage users to read further. So this is where everything started. I broke down the post component into smaller elements such as: Post Date Post Author Post Title Post Thumb Post Description Call To Action I decided to leave out some other usual elements such as category, tags, number of comments. After a few sketches, I had a solid idea of what I wanted to design. I'm not reinventing the wheel but attempting to simplify it, now days most blog themes have a crazy amount of options so my idea was to keep it simple & effective for both desktop and mobile devices. With the first and most important component done, I listed all the other components and elements I still had to design. Colors Typography Grid Images Navigation and Buttons Sidebar Footer Post Page Post Comments Colors Because the theme will have different color schemes, it's important that I organize how many colors will be used and where they will be used. So here is how I broke it down: Primary Color Secondary Color Background Color Text Color Link Colors Link Hover Active Once this color guide was created,  could simply change it to any other color using Adobe Photoshop by desaturating the guide to black and white and applying an overlay layer with my color of choice. Typography Next step was to define a base typography structure to be followed in the homepage posts and also on the inner pages and posts. My font of choice for this project was Source Sans Pro, a sans serif typeface by Adobe that works well in user interfaces. Even though I created a quick guide in photoshop, a full guide was coded to serve as reference (view typography guide). Grid I created a grid that would work well for a blog with sidebar, the grid is fluid and fully responsive with a  max-width of 1200 pixels. Images Even though the theme would be responsible and some of the image sizes will vary depending on the size of the screen, I wanted to set some max and min sizes based on the Grid. Navigation and Buttons The navigation was kept very simple, the color effects were determined by the colors I had already chosen to keep the consistency throughout the theme. Sidebar and Footer Footer and sidebar share the same components, so I designed them as one, the only thing that changes is the background color on the footer giving a bit of different feel to it's components. Post & Comments Components To finish up my style guide I designed all the components that will go into a post, and also the post comments components. Final Design Once my Style Guide was done, all I needed was to put everything together, I coded the HTML and CSS, and hand it to my friends at Slocum Studio to turn it into a wordpress theme. Some elements had slight changes during the code process. Here is the final homepage, the theme is fully responsive and features a 8 different color schemes. Demo and Buy it! To demo or buy this theme you can visit Socialize Pro where the theme is for sale. Also check out MattReport.com to see the theme in use. Hope you enjoyed this case study, if you have any questions leave a comment.

Biker - Illustration Case Study by PepeLife

Biker - Illustration Case Study by PepeLife

We tend to post case studies about visual identity or photo manipulation most of the time, it's very seldom that we feature more traditional illustration making-of. To change that today we will feature this super detailed illustration by Jorge Lopes, also know as PepeLife titled Biker and Jorge shows a little bit of his creative process, from sketches to details of the final composition. Jorge studied at the College of Fine Arts, Federal University Rio de Janeiro's School of Design and 3D at the University Veiga de Almeida. He is currently working at Nutslocomotyva Studio in Rio de Janeiro, as 3D artist. For more information visit http://jorgeglopes.blogspot.com/ via Behance

Winterwell Hand Lettered Case Study

Winterwell Hand Lettered Case Study

Hand lettered logos have become quite trendy in the past few years. I believe it's because the idea of handcrafted has become very important in terms of giving character to objects and therefore designs. Tobias Hall shared a super detailed case study showing how he created the logoset for Winterwell. It's definitely worth it and quite inspiring seeing his process. Tobias Hall is an illustrator, letterer and designer working out of London, UK. For more information visit: http://www.tobias-hall.co.uk/ Initial drawings Development of chose rough Final drawing Completed drawings Via Behance

Tupper_PRO - Typography

Tupper_PRO - Typography

I have seen my fair share of amazing typography projects and it's always incredible to see the depth of work behind the creation of a font. Mateusz Machalski illustrates that extremely well with his project title Tupper_PRO. With images showcasing all steps of the process, Tupper_PRO is a great reference to everyone out there trying to learn or improve their typography skills. This project was created by Mateusz Machalski the CEO of BO­RUTTA, a cre­ative pro­duc­tion studio spe­cia­lizing in ma­king still and mo­tion campaigns. For more information visit: http://borutta.pl/ Sketches Construction Weights and Widths Final result For the full project make sure to check out the Behance page at: https://www.behance.net/gallery/Tupper_PRO/14218345

Growth Hand Drawing Case Study

Growth Hand Drawing Case Study

Growth is a personal piece by Kerby Rosanes, an amazing illustrator from Philippines. In this post you will also see the process of creating and a time lapse video of the entire project. Enjoy! For more from Kerby Rosanes visit behance.net/kerbyrosanes. Details Growth is ink on 11" x 16" paper, using Canson A3 90gsm paper and Uni Fine Liners Growth

VIVACITY Case Study by Raku Inoue

VIVACITY Case Study by Raku Inoue

We are featuring this fantastic case study called VIVACITY by Raku Inoue. Raku is a clay artist, illustrator and motion artist based in Montreal, Qc of Canada. You wouldn’t believe how much work there is involved for just a few seconds of footage. This is a real proof of craftsmanship and determination. This was my first solo attempt to produce a stop-motion animation. “Evolution” has always been one of my mottos because I consider it to be a key ingredient for longevity in the ever-changing business of art and design. “Vivacity” developed from what I spoke at Montreal Meets 3, a design conference held this past year. That is, “A seed is in each one of us. We just need to find what it is, sow it into a fertile environment and nurture it until it bears fruits.” In Raku’s Words All Rights to Raku Inoue Striving for perfection is an important thing but it should never become the obstacle that blocks your way to accomplishments. All Rights to Raku Inoue All Rights to Raku Inoue All Rights to Raku Inoue It’s only recently that I have come to comprehend the After Effect application. I can’t pretend to have mastered it, still having a lot to learn. But, after my participation in a short stop-motion picture production last year, I wanted to see how I could use this application myself. All Rights to Raku Inoue All Rights to Raku Inoue There are many other applications specifically designed for stop-motion animation including IStopMotion and Stop Motion Pro. They simply overwhelmed and discouraged me with the amount of information I had to absorb to use them properly. It meant additional challenging task on top of learning the technique of stop-motion animating and mastering After Effect I had already initiated. And let’s not forget the countless number of different types of equipments out there to choose from. My interest in realizing this project started to wane. All Rights to Raku Inoue Personally I prefer to ask questions before taking actions to prevent failures. As far as this project was concerned, however, I felt the urge to act without asking too many questions. My vision for this project was very clear from the start. Besides, my last time-lapse video “The Contact” gave me the confidence that I would succeed in the animation if I had the right material. All Rights to Raku Inoue I had two choices. One was to gather as many equipments I could afford, take a few weeks to learn how to use a specialized stop-motion application and create an animation as it should be. The other was to move into action with what I had - thick cardboards, polymer clay, rolls of duct tape, etc. - and create something as it can be. All Rights to Raku Inoue I chose the latter. Surely enough, proper equipment is very important and probably makes the job easier. On the other hand, if you wait until the stars align perfectly, you may end up waiting longer than you should. All Rights to Raku Inoue Conclusion I would have acted differently if this had been a commissioned work. You cannot take chances with other people’s time and money. This was not the case of Vivacity. I had no reason not to take a risk. I hope this project shows you that mind rules over matter. If you have a great idea and you think you can execute it, then venture it. If you have the right tools or not, just make it possible. Links More info about Raku Inoue: http://www.rakuinoue.com/splash Follow Raku Inoue on Behance: http://www.behance.net/rakuinoue Follow Raku Inoue on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RakuInoue

JWT  Brazil - Made Of What You Are

JWT Brazil - Made Of What You Are

Background Info: this illustration was an A0 billboard produced for JWT Brazil's Troller car campaign. The original brief came attached with a rough concept sketch and some loose directions for what the client wanted to see in the image. The final image was created using 3D objects, stock photos and digital painting. Most of the lighting manipulation used in this image was done with photoshop layer adjustments and painting via a tablet. All 3D objects were created with the software Cinema 4D. Due to scheduling conflicts with the Cannes festival, the deadline for this image was six days. Saad Moosajee, a young self taught freelance Illustrator and Art Director from Denver, Colorado. This work was created for the Slashthree collectives and exhibitions. For more information visit http://www.saadart.com/ Client: Troller Agency: JWT Brazil Art Direction: Thiago Arrighi, Pedro Hefs Illustration: Saad Moosajee Step 1 original background plate is selected for manipulation. The perspective of the floor in the photograph and free flowing branches makes this an ideal image based on the brief provided. Step 2 3D renders are created to be used in the forest environment. The form of the objects are derived from the branches in the photo. The image is also manipulated into various bitmap textures that are applied to the 3D objects. Step 3 The 3D objects are cut up and integrated into the branches of the photograph. The floor of the photo is also extended. Step 4 More 3D objects are integrated into the branches, integration of the animal stocks also begins in addition to color and lighting adjustments. Step 5 3D objects that flow between the car and the humans hands are created. These forms contain loose references to the anatomy of the forest and the animals used in the piece. Numerous bitmap textures are mixed in order to achieve both consistency and variation in the light and color of the objects. Step 6 Further integration of the 3D objects into the environment. Rough placement of the figure and the 3D branches around the figure. Step 7 Continuing to experiment with the lighting and the forests environment. Step 8 Forest background is darkened and desaturated to disguise 3D objects. Foreground branches are developed. Step 9 Recreating the forest atmosphere required balancing dark, mysterious tones against areas of intense illumination. A main source of light was manipulated into the background in an effort to achieve the this effect. Step 10 The light of the composition is adjusted to match the new light source. Step 11 Continuing to adjust light & color of the composition, scale of figure and figures branches is reduced. Step 12 Rough car is placed into image. Step 13 Inside of the car is created via digital painting and 3D manipulation, lighting of car is adjusted to match the composition. Step 14 Color adjustments are made on the composition to give it more warmth, second half of the car is roughly placed. Step 15 More 3D branches and animals are added to the foreground. Step 16 Placement of foreground objects is shifted to be more central. Figure is swapped out by request of the agency Art Directors to someone ethnically brazilian. Manipulation of the ground begins here by roughing in some stock textures. Step 17 Placement of figure is adjusted, overall light of the image is adjusted. Ground is further manipulated with digital painting and cloned textures. Step 18 Quantity of light coming from the back light source is significantly increased to help capture the forest atmosphere. A warm, orange/green tinted light source is used. Step 19 After debating with the art directors regarding about the new figure, a third figure cleared for potential use in the image. The form and light of this new figure felt much more natural in the images environment. Darker lighting is also added to the ground. Step 20 Lighting is once again boosted from the background, this time spreading into the foreground. The texture and perspective of the ground is adjusted to match the original perspective of the floor, and the cars are shifted to a slightly more central position. Step 21 Approval is given for the cars to be colored, which proved to be a key aspect of this illustration. The cars are digitally painted to have a color that aligns with the hue of the main light source, giving the image a more unified aesthetic. Conclusion Final lighting adjustments and sharpening. Movie

Nike RED Laces Case Study

Nike RED Laces Case Study

When we talk about photo-manipulation we almost think about incredible compositions, like fantasy scenes, or crazy manipulations. Sometimes the most amazing work of this kind is so real that we cannot even perceive it as CGI. A great example is the Nike RED campaign created by Souverein where Drogba, the soccer player, creates the Nike symbol and a soccer ball using just laces. I have to say, the first time I saw I couldn't say it was CGI, I truly believed it was real, but as we found out it was CGI we needed to share with you a little bit of the creative process behind it. Drogba was shot without anything in his hands. The laces were then created in 3D and integrated into the photography. Creation Final result Details

Case Study: Macro Snowflakes Photos

Case Study: Macro Snowflake Photos

Russian photographer Alexey Kljatov tapes a $50 lens to his cameras and takes the most stunning macro snowflakes photos I have ever seen. Check out his work and learn the technique used to get such amazing result. For more about Alexey Kljatov visit facebook.com/pages/Chaoticmind75 and chaoticmind75.tumblr.com. The Photos This is postprocessed snowflakes, cropped from full 12mp shots, mix from 2009-2013 years. Usually i add to them artifical colors, because original shots almost monochromatic and looks not appealing. Some snowflakes captured in standard macro mode, others with Helios 44 add-on: Case Study I capture snowflakes at open balcony of my house, mostly on glass surface, lighted by LED flashlight from opposite side of glass, and sometimes in natural light, using dark woolen fabrics as background. On a floor of a balcony I put the turned stool (legs up), on them - a glass plate. Previously, i shoot using Canon A650's standard macro mode. For this, from a small plastic bottle I cut central cylindrical part in the form of a tube (height 5.5 cm). This height I picked up so that the lens of the camera, pushed in a tube, will be at distance 1 centimeter from the bottom (this is minimum focusing distance of Canon A650 in macro mode). I just put this cylinder with the camera's lens within it over the chosen snowflake, the lens looks vertically down. For steady shots, i shoot in small series with starting delay 1-2 seconds after focusing, taking away my hands off the camera. With free hand i illuminate snowflake with flashlight from under the glass. The flashlight shines through two layers of white plastic bag for more uniform lighting. This is enough for shooting even at night with minimum ISO and short exposure time. Recently, i built simple macro addon for the camera. I used lens Helios 44M-5 from old USSR SLR camera Zenit (here is short description in wikipedia). At first, i attached these lens at narrow wooden board (around 30 cm long), reversed: a back lens to snowflake, front lens to camera, and drilled in a board an opening for a screw suitable to tripod nest of the camera. Then camera is put on a board so that the lens in the maximum optical zoom mode (6x) touched Helios lens and looked straight into them. I attach the camera by a screw and additionally with metallic bracket, glued to the board, it holds opposite side of camera, so it didn't move anywhere. On Helios's back side (which is front of whole construction) i attached three standard narrow extension rings from Zenit camera (this is needed only in case of shooting at glass surface with backlight). This holds lens at needed focusing distance from the glass with snowflakes (2,5-3 centimeters). Place of connection between internal and external lens i covered with some sort of skirt, maked from black plastic bag: this protects connection point from outer light, snow, ice and waterdrops. All design turned out rather strong and steadily stands vertically with lenses looking down. I simply put it on glass over the chosen snowflake and shoot at maximum optical zoom instead of macro mode. Camera's autofocus works well. This is assembled construction: Ready for shooting: Simple scheme of add-on: This is an example shots in two modes, standard A650 macro mode and with external lens: I also wrote separate article about averaging identical shots. I used this technique for all recent snowflakes. For more about Alexey Kljatov visit facebook.com/pages/Chaoticmind75 and chaoticmind75.tumblr.com.

Coffee House London - Visual Identity

Coffee House London - Visual Identity

Branding and visual identity design is one of the most amazing areas of work for a designer. The variety of medias that the designer has to take into consideration and all the subtleties of each one require the designer to think holistically and systematically. In the end you have a consistent, efficient and of course beautiful result. To illustrate that we share with you the creative process behind Coffee House London, a visual identity designed by Reynolds and Reyner. London is a city deeply rooted in its traditions, history and architecture. Loyalties are formed in childhood and honored for a lifetime. So our task is not just to show the outstanding benefits of our product but to weave these assets into the larger culture and themes of London culture, combining the heritage of coffee drinks with the distinctive, one-of-a-kind pleasures of London House coffees. Launching a new coffee brand in today’s very competitive market is hugely challenging. You have to offer something truly unique, of the highest quality, along with great atmosphere. About Reynolds and Reyner Reynolds and Reyner's philosophy is rooted in the true power of design. They believe it is less about making high quality brand experiences and more about the process at which we engage in, to create a real relationship between our brands and their consumers. For more information visit http://reynoldsandreyner.com/

Chevy Equinox - Case Study

Chevy Equinox - Case Study

Automotive Design is probably one of the most fascinating areas of design in my opinion. It exemplifies how style, branding, technology and constraints play together while creating a product. Kirill Ponomarenko illustrates this in a project completed during his GM Exterior Design internship in the Summer 2012 focused on the Chevy Equinox. Kirill Ponomarenko is a industrial designer with BS Mechanical Engineering degree from Virginia Tech (2008), he has worked at the General Motors Aerodynamics group for over four years. While at GM, he also completed two exterior design internships in the summers of 2011 and 2012. I'm passionate about cars, racing, entertainment art, soccer, snowboarding, ice cream, and many other things. For more information visit http://www.kirillcandraw.com/

The Dollfins Poster - Case Study

The Dollfins Poster - Case Study

Rock band posters have always been one of the most prolific fields in terms of evolution and experimentation in the graphic design industry. Through different styles and attitudes, posters have created the image of bands and albums throughout history. An added bonus, they are always a lot of fun to create. Ian Jepson, a designer and illustrator from Cape Town, South Africa shares a little bit of his design process for the poster he created for The Dollfins. I took part in exhibition put together by Psych Night which brought together 14 illustrators, designers and poster artists to create a poster for a bunch of great Cape Town bands. I got to do The Dollfins! Sketches Initial rough. Process Final poster Details For more information about Ian Jepson's work visit http://www.ianjepson.co.za/

Case Study: Enchanted Garden from Desktopography

Case Study: Enchanted Garden from Desktopography

This year's Desktopography was amazing and I selected the work of Italian artist Dawlaz to display a case study with a step by step to show you how this amazing piece was done. Enjoy! For more about Dawlaz visit behance.net/dawlaz. Details Proccess

Case Study: Inter x Gremio Stadium

Case Study: Inter x Gremio Stadium

In this case study you will learn step by step how this image was created, with a mix of 3d, photoshop, and photography. The authors also narrated how everything was done so you can understand all the process. Enjoy! We were approached by TIM with a big challenge: to recreate a stadium during a soccer match with players on the field being watched by a huge crowd. We also needed to keep a symmetric balance between the two crowds of fans from rival teams. The first part of productions was to decide how to create the stadium in a way that it wouldn't look like the stadium of either team, making it a neutral ground. After long research for the ideal stadium we realized that the modern stadiums are very alike and we opted to go with 3D so we could actually create our own instead of replicating a stadium that already exists. Once we modeled the stadium we needed to give it some life by adding the fans making the stadium look as full as possible with both crowds divided exactly in the middle. The result we got using 3D was incredible, we were able to put thousands of people in the stadium making it full capacity. But the scene still needed to look more real so we added some small details using photoshop, using real photos to add details made all the difference. Many small flags, big flags, small colorful papers flying and we did the same with the players on the field. Now that the background was ready we moved into the second part of the process. We did a casting to select fans for the photo shoot. The jerseys were blank so the numbers could be added digitally, we also used big flags of the teams. We weren't sure if we should shoot the photos on the studio or outside so we decided that the best place for it would be outside on an actually stairway so we picked the famous "Escadaria da Lapa" that way we could reproduce the same angle and light needed. After the photos were done we just needed to finish the post production by positioning the models on the stadium and to finish up some last color details. Hope you guys liked the final result. Credits: CGI - Felipe Eckhardt Retouch - Helena Lopes / Marc Recco Photo - Alexandre Salgado

Desktopography 2013 by Craig Minchington

Desktopography 2013 by Craig Minchington

Designers and developers spend about 90% of their waking life in front of a computer so the most appealing genre for a wallpaper would be one that has beautiful design mixed with the all important aspect of outdoors. This is my Desktopography piece for the 2013 exhibition and is called ‘Extrasolar' which you download here. This was a collaboration with Mike Harrison a.k.a. Destill. The concept is based around an extrasolar planet, which is out of the solar system, yet desktopography has still found it’s way there in the form of a part buried logo. It was an honour to be asked by Pete to get involved this year and great to work with Mike on the piece. Go take a look at the rest of the amazing exhibition over at http://www.desktopography.net/

Race Ship Illustration by Dwayne Vance

Race Ship Illustration by Dwayne Vance

When I started my design career, back in late 90s, computers weren't that fast and design software, especially for illustration, wasn't as advanced as today. The result was that we used to draw much more. Now we see more and more fantastic digital painting and illustrations done in the computer. The MC Comic Con Ship 3 by Dwayne Vance is a great example. It preserves the trace and the organic feel to deliver a beautiful illustration. Here is the second ship in the series of Space Racers. This version is nothing but pure American Muscle. This was all painted in Painter 12.2 using the 2b pencil, thick and thin pen and the glow brush. Inspiration It takes place in the future obviously and it started out with government funding being cut to NASA. So NASA came up with a plan to stay in the market by creating a race circuit into space. They go out and seek sponsors for their project and it soon catches on. It started out in the US then eventually as the popularity grew it started to attract the other nations. So the space programs were all revitalized in a different way and started building race ships. They entered a whole new realm of racing space instead of just exploring it. So based on that short story he started to create these ships. Then each one has certain styling based on the country it represents. You can see each one has the flag painted on the body by the cockpit area on each ship. All these ships were started and finished in Painter 12. He drew the original sketches using the various pencils tools offered in Corel Painter. Then digitally painted them with the Thick and Thin pen brush in Painter 12. For hardware He was using a Wacom 21 UX monitor and a PC to produce all drawings and digital paintings. Each of these ships took approximately 4 hrs a piece to produce. For more information visit http://mastersofchickenscratch.com