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Case study: Tomb Raider by Marcelo Bastos

Case Study: Tomb Raider by Marcelo Bastos

Hi everyone, following the worldwide launch of Tomb Raider game, today we're going to present a case study of this illustration by the digital artist Marcelo Bastos. Marcelo is a artist based in Fortaleza, Brazil with a focus on speed painting and character design. You can see more artworks from Marcelo at his Behance and at his Facebook page. The main idea for this illustration was the launching of Tomb Raider's new game, a series that I'm a complete fan. So I decided to try out my version of Lara Croft based on the one from this game.Processo 1 After I made the pose for the illustration, it's time to square the shapes on the composition. Always trying to make soft lines in order to shape the image and also thinking about the lightning e shading (that's why I started it out on grayscale). Processo 2 Here we start to see some details popping out like the hair and eyes, but I keep the focus on the general image. On the beginning I never worry about the final details of the image, because you end up wasting too much time giving attention to a specific part. Processo 3 I changed a bit Lara's face as it wasn't with correct simmetry, I wanted her to look straight and strong. Here I used the hair to give some focus on the face, so it act like frame. Processo 4 As the focal point of the image is the face, I worked on details surrounding this area. I used rain brushes and textures for the background of the image, I also used the liquify tool to make some adjustments on the head and face. Final After I defined all the lightning, shadow and shapes on grayscale, I created a layer and set a overlay blending mode to apply the colors I selected previously for this project. After I defined the areas with the correct colors, than I just merge down all layers e start the refining process, always duplicating the layer after I make any change.

Case Study: Anchored in Blood by Felipe Navarro

Case Study: Anchored in Blood by Felipe Navarro

Hi everyone, today we are featuring a tutorial with traditional techniques with brushes and pencils, Felipe Navarro is going to show us the process behind his artwork "Anchored in Blood". Felipe is a illustrator based in Porto Alegre, Brasil with a peculiar taste for retro art and traditional techniques. You can see more from Felipe and his artworks at the following links: Website Behance Facebook Step 1 I did all the sketching process using pencils. On the beginning I though that the anchor should have a blue tone as a base for a more metallic fill. Well, it happened that I put too much blue on it hehe, but off course you can fix this by using some paper If the ink still wet, you can also put some white ink on it to achieve the color you wanted. Step 2 The blue anchor. Have you ever saw a blue anchor? I never saw one actually, so I decided to add some green ink to make it look a bit dirty. The stains were made by dripping some green ink and by letting the drops slide along the paper. Coloring the ropes was quite simple: just applied some muddy colors as brown, color it from the borders to the centre so you can make a volume gradient on it. Step 3 On the background I decided to use sponge as a brush, I tested in other sheet of people before to see if it would work. Also I dripped a lot of ink along the paper almost making a mess. Step 4 I thought that some points got too much dark and so I used a white pencil to fix this issue. Step 5 Using different pen tips I made the stroke of the anchor with india ink. Tip: If you're using a color pencil like I did, you can't use disposable india ink pen because it probably won't work over the pencil. Step 6 As a final act I used brush with water to enhance some points, stains and details. Final Result

Surreal 2013 Case Study by Cristian Eres

Surreal 2013 Case Study by Cristian Eres

One of the most important things when learning design, or pretty much anything, is to pay attention to how other designers tackle problems. That was my personal inspiration that led me to start sharing tutorials and case studies. They are not designed to help come up with ideas, but to help with the execution, one of the biggest problems most people have. In my opinion, good ideas aren't good without turning them into something palpable. In today's case study we will show you how Cristian Eres created the image featured as Wallpaper of the Week a few weeks ago. Christian, a Spanish freelance digital artist and graphic designer based in Valencia, has been creating digital art for over five years and is particularly skilled within illustration, graphic design and web design. Step 01 - Illustrator Scan Step 02 Vectorization, and added different gradients using the Shape Builder tool. Step 03 I retouched colors (I like to use the Recolor Artwork tool). Also I've added particles and joined the numbers to give unity to the piece. Step 04 Adding shadows with the Draw Inside tool for each element in the artwork. Step 05 Adding lights with the mesh tool. Step 06 - Photoshop Added background with two overlapped gradients. Step 07 Added some lights and sparkles. Conclusion Applied some curves and filters. Details For more information visit http://www.cristianeres.com/

Face your Fear - Case Study by Mart Biemans

Face your Fear - Case Study by Mart Biemans

The easiest way to learn in my opinion is by observing other peoples work, paying attention to the details and how some problems are overcome. That for me is more useful than a tutorial because it requires me not only attention but also makes me think on how I could do that with my set of skills. That's why case studies are extremely valuable. They show the evolution but without giving instructions. A good example is the amazing illustration by Mart Biemans that we brought to you today. For more information you can also visit http://martbiemans.com/ Process Final Details I've been working freelance in this field for over four years now and loving every second of it! Even though I love watching a lot different sorts of illustration I have lately put a focus on developing my own style. I am currently available for freelance work! If you think you might have a nice project for me or would like to hire me, please contact me via Contact at the top of this page. Next to my work as a Illustrator, Digital Artist and Graphic designer I am currently studying Vormgeving Communicatie (translated: Design & Communications) in Groningen, The Netherlands. - Mart Biemans

MILL10NAIRES - Impressive Illustration by Jakob Eirich

MILL10NAIRES - Impressive Illustration by Jakob Eirich

Today we bring to you another incredible image from the CGSociety TEN contest. The artwork was created by Jakob Eirich, a freelance 2D-artist currently based in Germany. The title of the artwork is MILL10NAIRES and it's simply amazing to see not only the final result but the evolution of the design until the outcome. Jakob graduated in July 2009 with a degree in graphics-design at the ‘HAWK – University of Applied Sciences and Arts’ in Hildesheim, Niedersachsen. The Story is about a couple that's after the american dream. They are willing to risk everything to reach their dreams and be together forever. Final piece Making of For more information and to check out Jakob's portfolio visit http://www.yakonusuke.com/

Drunk Aliens by Rafael Vallaperde - CGSociety TEN winner

Drunk Aliens by Rafael Vallaperde - CGSociety TEN winner

We have featured the work of the very talented Rafael Vallaperde here on Abduzeedo in the past and we are very happy to post about him and his work once again. This time, with an awesome making-of video of his beautiful artwork called "Drunk Aliens", winner of the Modeling prize in TEN CGChallenge by CGSociety. 'I’m really happy to know this! Also surprised, because I didn't think of nailing the modeling prize! Thank you very much CGSociety The inspiration to create this image came from friends as we were playing on brainstorming something about TEN. This image was created in two months working on a second shift after work. There are many things I'd like to keep working on, but at some point you’ve just got to call it done. Final piece Details David Hornick: Great technique, attention to detail and the emotion conveyed by the three characters is bang on. Makes me smile and want to have a shot with these guys. - Judges' comments Making of CG Challenge-Ten Drunk Aliens from Rafael Vallaperde on Vimeo. For more information and to check out Rafael's portfolio visit http://rafaelvallaperde.tumblr.com/

Medium Brand Development Study

Medium Brand Development Study

Medium is a new web site based on the belief that the sharing of ideas and experiences is what moves humanity forward. On this post we will take a close look at their brand development which is super interesting and looks amazing.

Remastered Doom in Photoshop

Remastered Doom in Photoshop

We post tutorials about how to use Photoshop, Illustrator and other apps. Spanning all sorts of styles and techniques we try to share simple tricks and, on occasion, more complex compositions. Nothing compares to the talented work of TJ Townsend with the post we share with you today. TJ creates a magical reconstruction of a classic image from the game DOOM. This is a remastered screenshot from the video game Doom. The original size was 320x240 and the final product is 9600x7211. This is the highest resolution Photoshop image I've done to date with the exception to a higher 3d rendering. Video Final image Some Details It is commonly agreed upon by all of humanity that Doom was the greatest game ever made. Okay, maybe not everyone. Doom was a PC game made in 1993 by id software. It was created by John Carmack, John Romero, Adrian Carmack and Tom Hall as well as many others. This is actually not a direct scene from the game but a composite. The Doom guy has only 1 rocket left and a pinky demon stands between him and freedom. If he shoots he's dead. These were some of the best moments in the game.

Design Staff Logo Case Study

Design Staff Logo Case Study

Creating a visual identity is always challenging, there are values and messages to pass through the logo, colors and all the branding assets. We try to share all sorts of case studies for different branding projects in order to illustrate the subtleties of each project and how designers approach these constraints. So for this post we will share the creative process behind the Design Staff logo. Design Staff is dedicated to helping startups design great products. We’re a community of designers, researchers, and entrepreneurs who have helped build some of the products you probably use everyday. For more information about Design Staff visit http://www.designstaff.org/

Stylish Illustrator Case Study by Mart Biemans

Stylish Illustrator Case Study by Mart Biemans

It's been a long time since we posted a nice illustration case study. Perusing some work on Behance we came across the illustration called Reclaim Your History. There was also an amazing Illustrator case study created by Mart Biemans to support DCAS United. The level of detail and style is impressive, making it an amazing source of reference for all of us whom are trying to evolve our illustration skills. This project was created to support the charity DACS United, a coalition made up of artists from around the globe. This collective of passionate artists aim to restore the lives of sex trafficking victims using art and design. This was part of the exhibition entitled Reclaim in New York City. Process Result Details About Mart Biemans Mart is a digital artist, graphic designer and illustrator from Groningen, Netherlands. Despite his young age, Mart has done work for great clients like Diesel, Envato, Curioos and many more. For more information about Mart visit his website at http://martbiemans.com/

PES 2013 Photoshop and Cinema 4D Case Study

PES 2013 Photoshop and Cinema 4D Case Study

We are accustomed to seeing the final result of a design and then judging whether it's good or bad. Most of the time we forget to think about the back and forth of ideas and countless iterations from the brief to the final product. That is what differentiates design from art and that is what we here at Abduzeedo always try to illustrate in our posts. Enter this amazing case study from Diego L. Rodríguez. Graphic created for the promotion event in Madrid of Konami's PES 2013 videogame. The initial brief indicated to create a digital image of Cristiano Ronaldo emerging to the videogame from a glass wall. Project process was absolutely crazy, with several changes of brief and a very limited time. The image was used in the main event for banners, flags, delluxe edtion boxes, promotions and web. Unfortunately the agency didn't provide me any of those products... Assets Effects These renderes were created for dynamic cupping masks and to emphasize the destruction of the player's body parts. In the beginning the brief indicated more destruction, glass effects and broken parts, but it was changed several times during the process. Stages Second round Third roundM/h3> Background New brief stage more block feeling, bricks, bigger glass pieces, less FX on the player's face. New brief stage 2 Final Version About Diego L. Rodríguez. Diego L. Rodríguez is a Spanish Illustrator and Graphic Designer based in Madrid (Spain). He's been always passionated by graphics and visuals, with influences from cinema, music videos, Japanese animation & comic books. He has a degree in Audiovisual Production and Digital Photography and studied Publicity at the UCM University in Madrid from 2004 to 2008. Over those years I started to combine digital graphics and photography, working for a few years as photographer. At the same time, I get involved with some digital art collectives, changing completely my vision, and swerving my work to illustration & mix media. For more information visit his website at http://paranoidme.com/

Platige: Beautiful Branding Project

Platige: Beautiful Branding Project

A beautiful and efficient visual identity project goes way beyond the logo, it is the integral base of any branding project. A solid and well thought out design will scale and help create a consistent image for any company and its services. The amount of work and iterations required is aplenty but the result is, as you can see in this post, incredible. The inspiration for this post is a branding project for Platige, a design studio from Warsaw, Poland. This specific project encompasses all requirements necessary to create an efficient visual design work, from the sketches for the logo, collateral pieces to gift cards. For more information visit: http://www.platige.com/ Platige is a vehicle for creative endeavors specializing in designing CG imagery, 3D animation, and digital special effects. At Platige, we combine film and advertising work with a strong passion for art, education, and entertainment. After 15 years we decided to change the logo and comprehensively overhaul the Platige brand. We wanted to achieve maximum simplicity and consistency in all elements of our new identity. The rebranding concept was developed by Adam Tunikowski and Michał Misiński from Juice, a Polish design agency. How did all of that happen? New Logo: Creative Process Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige The new symbol refers to the studio's previous logo and creates a strong, expressive symbol. We like simple and heavy forms, that’s why we turned to the best brand logos of the 1960s and 1970s for inspiration. These logos are recognizable even today because they are simple and “edgy” – just like our previous visual identity, founded upon the words Platige Image and the Π symbol. Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Pi is a mathematical constant that cannot be described with a finite set of numbers, and is thus a wellspring of unceasing inspiration and curiosity. The quest for a new logo culminated in the creation of a symbol comprised of a stylized letter “P” inscribed into a triangle, its shape retaining a clear reference to the mathematical symbol. This new “P” signifies the new Platige and is the centerpiece of the company's visual identity. Copyright of Platige Font Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Site Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Other usages Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige The “P” is the centerpiece of Platige’s new visual identity. The austere design presented us with very interesting options for modification. We used the logo as a sort of prism through which we present our work to the world. The dispersed picture created almost-Cubist compositions and enabled us to play with both the scale and detail of the image. Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige Copyright of Platige

Digital Illustration Case Study by Jörg Litschko

Digital Illustration Case Study by Jörg Litschko

One of the goals of this blog was and will always be to help designers and enthusiasts to improve their design skills but also to get motivated and inspired by other people's work. We feature portfolios, tutorials and case studies to do that and we hope you get as motivated as we get to try to create better work. Today we bring to you an amazing case study by Jörg Litschko from Stuttgart, Germany. The piece is an entry for the Mountain Dew Based Contest for the Design the Dew Contest on dA For more information about Jörg Litschko visit his website at http://www.thefers.com/ Sketches Final piece

Digital Illustration Case Study by Adolfo Correa

Digital Illustration Case Study by Adolfo Correa

A couple of years ago we published a beautiful wallpaper created by Adolfo Correa, a student of Graphic Design from Santiago, Chile. The image is a mix of drawings and digital arts with a really cool outcome. Adolfo has some great works in his portfolio and that we highly recommend that you check it out, especially some of the typography artworks like The Prodigi, A Tribute to Yulia Brodskaya and Free Tibet + Typography Case Study Final Piece Details For more information visit Adolfo's portfolio at http://www.behance.net/kultsi

Case Study - Vintage Neon Sign

Case Study - Vintage Neon Sign

Today I selected an amazing Case Study by the illustrator Michael Doret. He will take you on a detailed journey of how he designed this awesome Vintage Neon Sign for Sweet. Take a look step by step and follow the notes of the author for specific details. For more from Michael Doret visit michaeldoret.com and behance.net/MichaelDoret It was unanimously felt that this logo should resemble a classic theater marquee. I had an image in my head of what that might look like for this logo. But for something like this I always need do some research, to help me get the right attitude and not to just rely on my memory. There are some fantastic theater marquees in downtown Los Angeles (where I now live), but I found one that really was going in the direction I was visualizing in, of all places, Erie, Pennsylvania—The Warner: Although this marquee was a bit too intricate for my taste, and there was no neon (I must have the neon look in a marquee design!), I loved the whole sun-ray thing going on behind the letters, and decided that this marquee—although it would not be my only point of reference—would be my main inspiration point. So I started puttin my thoughts to paper: In the first rough above, I was heading in a direction, but still groping around for specifics. By the second rough, I was firmly on my way to solving the problem. And by the third rough, more or less nailed the basics of the design: At this point, the design was approved, and I went on to build the design in Illustrator. I do it in values of gray before assigning color, just so I know that certain shapes are separating from others properly. Below I’m building the graphic over a template of the rough pencil drawing (above). To be honest there were many, many more steps than what you see depocted below, but it would be impossible to show them all, and very difficult for a viewer to decipher exactly what’s going on. Suffice it to say that I built this art in layers, and in many ways it may have been similar to building an actual neon sign: I didn’t want to literally appropriate the color from the Warner marquee, so I started doing my own color solutions, but I didn’t think they worked the way I wanted them to: So I pretty much went back to a color palette more reminiscent of that Warner marquee: Building the art like a real sign apparently had its advantages because the client loved the art so much that he decided to have it made into a real lifesize neon sign for inside the store. To do this would be quite an elaborate project, and so the client and his Store Architect enlisted the services of SignMeister Robert M Fitch (who was already working on other signage in Sweet!) to oversee the implementation of this complicated project which included three types of sign illumination: chasing light bulbs, neon script and internal LED illumination. So together with Robert’s assistance I’ve put together a very abbreviated photographic synopsis of how this sign was assembled and finally installed in Sweet!. I think the sign really turned out well, and ended up looking surprisingly close to my graphic. This is what’s called open face channel lettering which, in the case of a connected script type, becomes a “sign can” which defines the letterform and houses the neon. It’s constructed from sheet metal, the returns (sides) are hand formed and welded to the letterform back plate. My Illustrator vector art was used to cut out the basic shapes. As in my art, the letters were formed out of only four separate pieces: Robert specified different colors for the inside and the outside of the can lettering. Here the different planes of the letters are being masked off and painted: Here the sign box in which everything goes is being created. The sheet metal sides are being pieced together, and you can see some of the specialized tools—the sign hammers—in the foreground: These are routed Sintra pieces that are applied to the sign face and perimeter details to help create dimension. The scale of the sign wasn’t large enough to form some of my details out of sheet metal, so this non-traditional material was used since the sign would only be used indoors: Robert designed and had fabricated side extensions for the marquee, nicely picking up some of the design elements of the sign graphic: When the sign’s neon and chase lights are illuminated, its color appearance changes dramatically: For more from Michael Doret visit michaeldoret.com and behance.net/MichaelDoret

Kitsch Me If You Can Case Study by Falcon White

Kitsch Me If You Can Case Study by Falcon White

Here we are today with another amazing case study by Falcon White, a designer based from Germany and this time he's doing a Case Study about his Desktopography 2012 submission entitled Kitsch Me If You Can. Hope you'll enjoy it! For the Desktopography 2012 Exhibition I wanted to come up with a different kind of ‘80s inspired photo illustration. I wanted to do a really cheesy and kitschy nature scenery but at the same time a really colorful one. Something with a hint of fantasy. Rainbows and unicorns came into my mind. So why don‘t just throw some rainbow bride and my little pony into the ring and see what happens. Also check out the Desktopography website for downloading a great load of beautiful wallpapers, initiated by Pete Harrison Desktopography.net . For more information about Falcon White, you can visit his FalconWhite.de and by also give it a LIKE on Facebook. Step 1 After buying the right photo material, I made a first compositing and started cutting out each horse. All Rights to Falcon White Step 2 I took the background photo, duplicated and scaled it to fill the white space. All Rights to Falcon White Step 3 Some unnecessary elements were erased quick and dirty and I started to add some landscape elements like the waterfalls, the mountains and some stone elements in the foreground area. All Rights to Falcon White Step 4 Different sky photos were blend together and formed the final sky. A picture of a beach with the right perspective helped to create the sandy ground for the horses. All Rights to Falcon White Step 5 Time to fit in a rainbow for the cheesy ‘80s vibe! All Rights to Falcon White Step 6 Some dust for the background area and of course the Desktopography logo combined with a waterfall came into play. All Rights to Falcon White Step 7 Last adjustments for the left horse with scaling and using the Puppet Warp tool to put it into a better position. The horns of the unicorns were done in Cinema 4D and we also used C4D to give them the right perspective. A cut out tree photo plus rotated duplicates placed upon the logo created the perfect nature feeling. Some birds also felt free to fly along the sky. All Rights to Falcon White Step 8 Time for more dust, contrasts, shiny and brighter parts. The unicorns went through a first round of dodge & burn. The horns became shadows and were adjusted to blend right in. All Rights to Falcon White Step 9 First color adjustments - some blue, red, yellow and green spots were thrown on this. All Rights to Falcon White Step 10 A lot of fill and adjustment layers later (hue/saturation, selective colour, channel mixer, colour balance..) the wallpaper became more colourful like a rainbow. All Rights to Falcon White Step 11 It was about time to let the unicorns shine. All three became an outer and inner white glow and some more painted highlights. The right brush set helped a lot to get a surreal starry sky and gave the top of each horn a higher kitsch factor. All Rights to Falcon White Step 12 In the last step, dust and scratches were removed and I added a Reduce Noise filter to get a smooth, nearly painted look. Finally the wallpaper was sharpened via Highpass and the edges were darken a little bit. All Rights to Falcon White

Awesome Magneto Digital Painting Case Study by Eric Vasquez

Awesome Magneto Digital Painting Case Study by Eric Vasquez

This is a Case Study based off of the Marvel Villains Series that I just recently completed. The series consists of 8 digital paintings depicting some of the most evil villains in the Marvel Universe. As an avid comic book fan, I wanted to create something that I felt very passionate about and really take my time to try and develop my digital painting skills along the way. The following is a closer look at the process for one of the eight paintings that all began with a pencil drawing. The entire project took just under a year to complete and can be seen in it’s entirety by visiting my site at http://www.ericvasquez.net or http://www.behance.net/EVasquez84 Step 01 Once I had an idea in mind for the villains that I wanted to use (in this case, Magneto) I began looking through comics and different images to get a solid base of reference material. From there, it was time to put the pencil to the page and start doing some sketches. For some of the characters in the series I did several thumbnails before arriving at a composition that I was happy with, but for Magneto, I ended up going with a pose that felt both powerful and dynamic. Step 02 After sketching Magneto, I scanned the illustration into my computer and brought it into Photoshop where I proceeded to silhouette him and remove the background. I wanted to keep the backgrounds simple to keep the focus on the actual character, so I decided to use a basic red gradient dark to light. The next step was to make a selection of Magneto and then do some color blocking to fill in the different areas of his costume. I like to work this way when starting off because it allows you to have more control over the individual pieces of the character, at least until you get it to a point where you can work on the overall image and focus on the bigger picture. Step 03 Now that I have my flat colors laid out I can start rendering the different areas of the body/costume. I don’t really think it matters exactly where you begin this process, but many would say that it’s best to start with the face and the head. In this case, I started with the chest to try and develop a palette using only reds to create a good range of value. Step 04 After establishing some values in the chest area I dove right into the helmet, which I really wanted to give some form and dimension. One way to do this is to place a light color next to a dark color, and then add another light color on the other side until it starts to take shape. In the image below you will notice how the top of the helmet has some rim lighting along the edge along with some reflections on the front of the helmet facing the viewer. Step 05 Continuing to work on the helmet and head area to bring out some definition and form. Also, I found that as I was painting I would cover up my pencil marks as I went along so that by the time the piece was done you would no longer need your original base illustration. Sometimes the pencil sketch can provide a nice effect, but in this instance I wanted to make it feel more like a traditional painting. Step 06 Skipping ahead, I began to render the darker purple areas of the costume including Magneto’s belt and upper chest piece that goes around his neck and traps. It can be a bit tricky rendering different materials based on the amount of light that they reflect. For example, the tights appear to be much less reflective than the upper chest piece that helps to give the illusion that it’s made from a different material like cloth as opposed to metal. Step 07 Keeping the same rule of thumb in mind, I moved onto the hands and gloves to create a shiny/metallic kind of feel to it that also adds realism. Notice that it doesn’t have to be incredibly detailed to be convincing to the eye. The fingers specifically are maybe two or three shades of color blended together, but by using a brush with either hard or soft edges, you can create some clearly defined highlights and shadows. Step 08 In the next step I returned to the head so that I could finish off the purple pieces of the helmet. By having a few touches of lighter color with hard edges on an otherwise subtle transition of color, I was able to further reinforce the reflective qualities of the helmet. Step 09 At this point I was pretty happy with the way things were looking but wanted to make another pass over the red areas of his costume with a slightly lighter shade of pink/white to add some highlights. Keeping in mind the type of material you may be rendering you don’t want to have a really sharp and crisp light source on a less reflective type of material. You will notice this especially on the arm and upper body where the highlights appear smooth, but help to add more form to the body. Step 10 After the rest of the body was complete it was time to move onto the cape with all of the folds and wrinkles. This was a bit tricky because some of the cape will cast a shadow and have an effect on the other parts, but you still want it to feel balanced in terms of light and dark. By focusing on each area of the cape a little bit at a time and rendering the folds, you will begin to see things take shape and really come to life. The last step here was to add some slightly brighter areas of color where the cape would be facing the light source to bring those areas out. Conversely, the darker and more heavily shadowed areas will recede into space to create some depth. Conclusion Overall, this was a really fun project to work on, and in the process I feel that it has helped me to improve my digital painting skills along the way. There have been many times where I have started something and then felt discouraged, but with persistence and practice comes greater ability. If you have something you’ve wanted to try and learn for a while, don’t be afraid to fail because experience really is the best teacher. I hope you have enjoyed this case study and if you haven’t checked out the whole series please feel free to stop by my site for more!