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Desktopography 2015 Wallpaper Exhibition

Desktopography 2015 Wallpaper Exhibition

Stop whatever that you are doing! Desktopography just released its 2015 collection and it's full of gorgeous pieces from the most talented designers and illustrators from our community. It's time to update your screens with a beautiful collection of wallpapers. By Jakub Skop By Martin Grohs By Łukasz Wiktorzak By Carles Marsal By Heiko Klug By Karim Fakhoury By Aeon-Lux By Pete Harrison By Rosario Nocera and Davide Brusa By Valp Links More info about Desktopography: http://desktopography.net/ Check out the latest exhibit: http://desktopography.net/exhibition/2015

Case Study: Desktopography Valley by Jennifer Cirpici

Case Study: Desktopography Valley by Jennifer Cirpici

We've featured this beautiful wallpaper by our friend Jennifer Cirpici a little while ago. Now she's back and sharing with us a Case Study about how she made her Desktopography Valley. Enjoy! Every time you make something, you set higher values and become more precise. Remember to always set your own bar higher and higher. Never make yourself regret that you did not do enough, but that what you did, was the best you could do. 1. Starting all over again Over the past few years a lot of things have changed for me. I’m studying again and my 3 year internship takes a lot of time. It was difficult for me to find time to work on a piece for Desktopography for the past 2 years. But the thought of working on it again, never left. While I was looking on it, being 2 years older and on a new 27 inch iMac, I noticed that the sky was good enough. I was still very pleased with it. The rest? My god. The colours, the tree, everything I just couldn’t use. I decided it was time for a new concept and with that a new approach. This also helped me to get motivated again to work on it. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici It took me a couple of hours till I thought of a new concept. What if I decide to do something difficult, but to completely rstrongove the middle and focal rock and to replace it with the logo in shape of an island?I took the unedited stock again which I saved and started working on it. It was difficult and it took more than a day to get the technical stuff done. With technical stuff I mean 3 basic things that need to be absolutely as perfect as possible: Rendering, Blending and Perspective. 2. Know what motivates you to go on It maybe sounds silly, but I get very motivated when I first start to set the colours right. This always is a long progress for me, so what you are seeing now isn’t the final result.I believe everyone has this sort of routine when someone starts working on something. Some begin with a sketch and some need to have a certain kind of music. I wanted the colours to look retro, to have a VSCO feel. In the end I ditched this idea (will come back to this later). After I played a bit with the colours I started to remove the big old’ rock. Whoa and that was difficult. It took a lot of my time, because removing something isn’t really fun for me. To continue motivating myself and to give myself a clear view of how it would look, I started adding water. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici How I did that? Simple. Copy and paste water, blend those in, digital paint, perspective tool and puppet warp. The perspective tool and puppet warp are two tools I used a lot in this piece, because the perspective was crucial. It could make or break it. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici 3. Making the island During these technical phases of an illustration, it’s important to keep yourself motivated. It was high time for me to take a break and get some groceries, take a shower and look at it from fresh eyes again a couple of hours later.I did had the bad luck that I was fighting against time, because the deadline was coming soon. Which meant that I was working from 12 pm till 5 am on it, until I couldn’t see it anymore and went to bed to start working on it again the next day. My friends think that this is crazy. Maybe it is. But it gives me such an adrenaline rush when I’m able to finish a piece. Like you’re on drugs. Well, you guys know what I mean haha. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici How I made the island is the same way I made water. My photo-manipulation works are always a combination between painting and stockphoto’s (maybe sort of like a matte painting).I never just render and try to blend something in while not digital painting around it. Painting it makes things blend as well into the scenery. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici I've also decided that the island shouldn’t exactly match the logo. Nature isn’t perfect, so this shouldn’t be either. It should make you wonder. And that wonder part makes people look at your image longer and make thstrong start liking it. I’ve learned this while I was working full time as a designer and wanted to strive for perfection. But when it comes down to illustrations like these, do not aim for perfection. The imperfection makes it yours. 4. Focus on the details All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici Above is a clear example of how important perspective can be. I’ve tried the perspective tool (edit > transform > perspective) till it looked right and made these tiny little islands in the shape of the leaves of the logo. Some are fully covered with trees, some not. Like I said, nature isn’t perfect. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici Pay close attention to how things in nature look like. How edges from an island are shaped, how depth is working et cetera. If it does not look right, ask for feedback.Even a child from 10 can tell you, with no experience what so ever in Photoshop, if something looks weird or not. He or she could not point out what you could do about it, but can tell you with no-photoshop-eyes that it should look differently. Just a tip I once got as well. 5. And… flip it horizontal While I was working on it, there was something about the piece that I didn’t like. It had to do how we like to look towards a viewpoint. You see, now the rock at the left asked for my attention, not the logo in the middle. That needed to change, because I wanted the logo to grab the attention. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici I often fix everything that takes the viewers away from the concept/focal point I want them to lay their eyes first one. And with this I mean blurred leaves in front, an eagle (coming back to this later) or in this case a rock.I’ve also asked two opinions about this decision: to my aunt, who is a photographer and to Mark Vogelaar, also a contributor at OtherFocus. Both of them agreed that it looked more pleasing for them when it was flipped. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici 6. Adding my 2012 Sky and starting to change the colours All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici I’ve added the sky in it, changed the colours a bit and noticed that my piece was getting darker and darker again.Sure, it should be dramatic, but I felt it became lifeless due to the colours. Around this time my pet became very sick so I had to go to the vet. This reflected in how I was working on the piece.The moment he became a bit better and so that I looked at it with fresh eyes again, the moment the piece started to become better. I added more colours to it: made the trees/plants more green and the water and sky more blue. Remember that before I mentioned an eagle? I bought a, let’s say not very cheap, stock photo of an eagle. It’s absolutely stunning.Full of detail and it’s crispy sharp. Exactly how you want a stock photo to be, because that makes rendering easier. I started rendering it (I do this with calculations > channels and personally find this the best way to do complex rendering) and trying to see where the eagle could ‘fly’. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici But no matter where I paste the eagle, no matter how small or big I made it or how well I tried to blend it in within the colour schstronge, it just took away the attention. Remember where I wanted the attention to be? I wanted the eagle to be an addition, not that the viewers see something that looks like an eagle (maybe even wonder if it really is an eagle!) and then see the logo. Get rid of everything that does not make sense huh… Decision time again. I got rid of it. 7. Know where the light comes from A difficult part. There are multiple light sources I this illustration, also because there is a ‘storm’ coming. But right now I wanted to flip the sky and make the left side darker and the right side lighter. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici Another trick that I use since I was 14, is adding a gradient with a white circle in the middle where I want the focus to be. Then I set it on soft light with an opacity of 2-5%. It makes it stand out a bit more. 8. Final touches Unfortunately it was already Tuesday and in a few hours the exhibition would go live. This is my favorite part of working on a photo manipulation: the final touches, the final details, the painting. I can go nuts on it for days. But there wasn’t much time left so I had to set down my priorities: making the water look better by adding reflections, plants, depth, waves, reflection from the sky et cetera. All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici I’ve also fixed the depth within the leaves by adding light and shadow. Doing this by digital painting it as well. Just using the standard brushes that are already in Photoshop. I vary from soft to hard brush and set the opacity and flow lower. Final result All Rights to Jennifer Cirpici This entire progress: the decisions I had to make, how my mood is reflected into the design, which music I listen to while working on it (huge fan of Bonobo), how I set my colours, how I set my focal point etc. is what I call ‘style’. So how do you find your style? In my opinion it is figuring out your working routine. Which steps do you continuously repeat? That makes your artwork yours. Thanks for following my work in progress. Hope you like it! You can download the wallpaper for your desktop at Desktopography here. Video Links More about Jennifer Cirpici and her blog: http://www.otherfocus.com Follow Jennifer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jennifercirpici More about Desktopography: http://desktopography.net/ Previously seen on OtherFocus

Desktopography 2014 Wallpaper Exhibition

Desktopography 2014 Wallpaper Exhibition

It's that time of the year again! Desktopography just released its 2014 collection with almost 100 wallpapers by some of the worlds most talented designers and illustrators. Grab yourself a new wallpaper or more than one. Share your digital world. Nature's Design on your Desktop We are showcasing only a sample of the 2014 collection, to view the entire exhibit and download some wallpapers. Visit Desktopography.net. By Jennifer Cirpici By Ivan Feusi By Radim Malinic By Anthony Gargasz By Carles Marsal By Adam Spizak By Nicolas Monin-Baroille By Edgar Romanovskis By Karim Fakhoury By Moe Pike Soe By Heiko Klug By Pete Harrison and Evade By Martin Grohs By Heiko Klug By Whendell Souza and Paulo Bert Links: Entire 2014 Collection: http://desktopography.net/exhibition/2014 Follow Desktopography on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/desktopography

Case Study: Enchanted Garden from Desktopography

Case Study: Enchanted Garden from Desktopography

This year's Desktopography was amazing and I selected the work of Italian artist Dawlaz to display a case study with a step by step to show you how this amazing piece was done. Enjoy! For more about Dawlaz visit behance.net/dawlaz. Details Proccess

Desktopography 2013 Wallpaper Exhibition

Desktopography 2013 Wallpaper Exhibition

Desktopography is a wallpaper exhibition that is released once a year. Every year the exhibition is more striking with artists from all over the globe creating amazing pieces of art to be displayed on your desktop. This year of 2013 no different, the exhibition is completely amazing, check it out! Visit Desktopography and check out the Facebook Page Here are just a fews pieces of the 2013 exhibition, to view the entire collection and download some wallpapers go to Desktopography. by Anthony Gargasz by Dawlaz by Abbey Esparza by Anthony Giacomino by Jono Kivex by Marek Purzycki by Adam Spizak by Josh Dykgraaf by Eremenkov Dmitriy by Krasi For more visit Desktopography and check out the Facebook Page

Kitsch Me If You Can Case Study by Falcon White

Kitsch Me If You Can Case Study by Falcon White

Here we are today with another amazing case study by Falcon White, a designer based from Germany and this time he's doing a Case Study about his Desktopography 2012 submission entitled Kitsch Me If You Can. Hope you'll enjoy it! For the Desktopography 2012 Exhibition I wanted to come up with a different kind of ‘80s inspired photo illustration. I wanted to do a really cheesy and kitschy nature scenery but at the same time a really colorful one. Something with a hint of fantasy. Rainbows and unicorns came into my mind. So why don‘t just throw some rainbow bride and my little pony into the ring and see what happens. Also check out the Desktopography website for downloading a great load of beautiful wallpapers, initiated by Pete Harrison Desktopography.net . For more information about Falcon White, you can visit his FalconWhite.de and by also give it a LIKE on Facebook. Step 1 After buying the right photo material, I made a first compositing and started cutting out each horse. All Rights to Falcon White Step 2 I took the background photo, duplicated and scaled it to fill the white space. All Rights to Falcon White Step 3 Some unnecessary elements were erased quick and dirty and I started to add some landscape elements like the waterfalls, the mountains and some stone elements in the foreground area. All Rights to Falcon White Step 4 Different sky photos were blend together and formed the final sky. A picture of a beach with the right perspective helped to create the sandy ground for the horses. All Rights to Falcon White Step 5 Time to fit in a rainbow for the cheesy ‘80s vibe! All Rights to Falcon White Step 6 Some dust for the background area and of course the Desktopography logo combined with a waterfall came into play. All Rights to Falcon White Step 7 Last adjustments for the left horse with scaling and using the Puppet Warp tool to put it into a better position. The horns of the unicorns were done in Cinema 4D and we also used C4D to give them the right perspective. A cut out tree photo plus rotated duplicates placed upon the logo created the perfect nature feeling. Some birds also felt free to fly along the sky. All Rights to Falcon White Step 8 Time for more dust, contrasts, shiny and brighter parts. The unicorns went through a first round of dodge & burn. The horns became shadows and were adjusted to blend right in. All Rights to Falcon White Step 9 First color adjustments - some blue, red, yellow and green spots were thrown on this. All Rights to Falcon White Step 10 A lot of fill and adjustment layers later (hue/saturation, selective colour, channel mixer, colour balance..) the wallpaper became more colourful like a rainbow. All Rights to Falcon White Step 11 It was about time to let the unicorns shine. All three became an outer and inner white glow and some more painted highlights. The right brush set helped a lot to get a surreal starry sky and gave the top of each horn a higher kitsch factor. All Rights to Falcon White Step 12 In the last step, dust and scratches were removed and I added a Reduce Noise filter to get a smooth, nearly painted look. Finally the wallpaper was sharpened via Highpass and the edges were darken a little bit. All Rights to Falcon White

Desktopography 2012 Exhibition

Desktopography 2012 Exhibition

Desktopography is a wallpaper exhibition that is released once a year. Curated by Pete Harrison and supported with visual artists from all over the globe, this year is no different. The exhibition is completely incredible and hope you will enjoy it too. Designers and developers spend about 90% of their waking life in front of a computer so the most appealing genre for a wallpaper would be one that has beautiful design mixed with the all important aspect of being outdoors. For more information about Desktopography and her wallpapers, you can visit their website at Destopography.net also like them on Facebook. Memorial by Heiko Klug Natural Freedom by Magyar László / Lacza The Morning Star by Adam Spizak Invasion by RDN Hidden Nature by Martin de Diego Sádaba Crimsonland - Trisme Last Rays by Bastien Grivet The Trespasser by Adam Spizak Hungry for Blood by Mart Biemans Raging Water by Marek Playground by Mike Harrison Back to the Beginning by Oliver Gareis Desktopography by Przemek Nawrocki Beta of Barsoom by Fresh for Death Desktopography'12 by Richard Roberts Zenith by Dean Falsify Cook Circles by Justin Maller L'effondrement dy ciel gris by Fatkur History repeats itself by Edit Animals by Bartosz Piotrowski Dock of Sound by Bự Blind Horse by Thomas Gayet Lifestream by James Zwadlo Gaia by Kode Logic Nightfall by Pete Harrison & Jordy Roelofs Kitsch Me If You Can By Falcon White

Antonio Bay Case Study by Falcon White

It's always a great thing to see how a designer works, it's a great way to learn and also to progress with your own skills. Now I wanna share a case study from Ralf Krause aka Falcon White, who did this piece for Desktopography 2011. I hope you will enjoy it and free your mind on new knowledge. To know more about Ralf Krause, you can check out his website at FalconWhite.com or check out his Behance. In Ralf's WordsLike all the other elements, I cut out the main image. Antonio Bay by Falcon White For the hair I used a masked picture of a woman. Antonio Bay by Falcon White A cracked texture, some colour corrections and increased contrast came into play. Antonio Bay by Falcon White I opened a second document to build the background with 2-3 ocean pictures that where blended together by masks. Antonio Bay by Falcon White More rocks and a ship where added and on some spots I brushed some „Fog“ and turned the whole background to orange. Antonio Bay by Falcon White Time for a third document. There I placed the skull and the background scenery in front of a green coloured cloud layer and started to add some smoke behind the skull‘s hair. Antonio Bay by Falcon White Cut out pictures of a neck and a knight‘s armour completed the fog walker. Birds appeared in the back and the skull got a green coloured touch. Antonio Bay by Falcon White In this step some shadows where brushed and using Dodge and burn I increased the contrast. The palm leaves where placed and a little bit more fog moves in. Antonio Bay by Falcon White Time to place the parrot... Antonio Bay by Falcon White that went through dodge and burn. The skull also got a little bit more hair..well, actually it‘s feathers. Then I made everything darker and gave the whole wallpaper a more violet colour… Antonio Bay by Falcon White That changed in most spots into blue... Antonio Bay by Falcon White and ended up with a green color mood with flat black tones. Antonio Bay by Falcon White This wallpaper “Antonio Bay” was inspired by the movie “The Fog” – a true ‘80s classic by John Carpenter. By the way you’ll find a lot of great wallpapers on Desktopography.net initiated by Pete Harrison.

Desktopography 2011 Exhibition

Desktopography is a wallpaper exhibition that is released once a year. Every year the exhibition is more striking with artists from all over the globe creating amazing pieces of art to be displayed on your desktop. This year is no different, the exhibition is completely amazing! Visit Desktopography and check out the facebook page Here are just a fews pieces of the 2011 exhibition, to view the entire collection and download some wallpapers go to Desktopography. Humanitys last hope By Adam Spizak Garden By Lionel Charpentier Silence By Hassan Loukal Antonio Bay By Ralf | Falcon White Desktopography 11 By José Paulo Heavens nectar By Mike Harrison The Siphon By Finnian MacManus Ecotype By Marcin Stryczek

Desktopography 2010 Exhibition Release

I've never waited so eagerly for an art exhibition like I did for the 2010 version of Desktopography's annual design explosion. Just minutes after the release the site crashed due to massive traffic income. Well, if that isn't a good sign? The newest annual exhibition is more colourful, more beautiful and more playful than ever, there to ease your desktop and bring fresh design on your computerdesks. The site is running again and you can visit the exhibitions of the last 6 years on Desktopography.com. And make sure to follow their Facebook Page. Whether it is the landscape of imagination or the splendid design work Desktopography 2010 is better than ever. Enjoy a fine selection of their newest joint, here: The 2010 Desktopography Exhibition

Inspiration: Desktopography

We've shown you exhibition-sites like DepthCore, Phirebrush or Evoke. Here's a site that focus on Desktop Wallpapers. Desktopography publishes their 4th exhibition and a new album. Dont miss it. Download their High-Resoltion-Wallpapers on their Website. For more please visit Desktopography.net For more please visit their website Desktopography.net