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Bringing Historic Photos to Life

Bringing Historic Photos to Life

Going through history is such a beautiful learning experience and also very fascinating. We've found some old black and white photos going through some bequtiful treatment, all of them are done by artists that use a mix of historical reference and of course some really good judgement for the colours. Hope you will enjoy them! London 1945 | Original Photograph by Toni Frissell & Colorized by HansLucifer All Rights to Toni Frissell All Rights to Toni Frissell May 6, 1937 | Colorized by Dana Keller Circa 1860 | Colorized by Jordan J. Lloyd Civil War, 1864 | Colorized by Sanna Dullaway Circa 1939 | Colorized by zuzahin Washington D.C, 1921 | Colorized by Sanna Dullaway Los Angeles, 1953 | Original Photograph by Bob Willoughby & Colorized by traquea All Rights to Bob Willoughby Long Island, NY 1939 | Colorized by Edvos Audrey Hepburn | Colorized by Dana Keller 1939 | Original Photograph by Dorothea Lange & Colorized by Jordan J. Lloyd All Rights to Dorothea Lange All Rights to Dorothea Lange 1933 | Original Photograph by Time & Life Pictures & Colorized by zuzahin All Rights to Time & Life Pictures 1893 | Original Photograph by Napoleon Sarony & Colorized by Dana Keller All Rights to Napoleon Sarony 1923 | Original Photograph by National Photo Company & Colorized by zuzahin All Rights to National Photo Company All Rights to National Photo Company 1939 | Colorized by BenAfleckIsAnOkActor 1880 | Colorized by Sanna Dullaway 1887 | Colorized by Dana Keller Circa 1900 | Colorized by zuzahin 1956 | Original Photograph by Frank Worth Photo & Colorized by malakon All Rights to Frank Worth Photo All Rights to Frank Worth Photo

De Stijl Influence

De Stijl Influence

Yesterday we featured Bauhaus and its importance to design to these days. Today we will feature another extremely important movement for art and design, De Stijl or simply "The Style". I am a huge fan of these style, especially Piet Mondrian paints. De Stijl, Dutch for "The Style", also known as neoplasticism, was a Dutch artistic movement founded in 1917. In a narrower sense, the term De Stijl is used to refer to a body of work from 1917 to 1931 founded in the Netherlands. De Stijl is also the name of a journal that was published by the Dutch painter, designer, writer, and critic Theo van Doesburg (1883–1931) that served to propagate the group's theories. Next to van Doesburg, the group's principal members were the painters Piet Mondrian (1872–1944), Vilmos Huszár (1884–1960), and Bart van der Leck (1876–1958), and the architects Gerrit Rietveld (1888–1964), Robert van 't Hoff (1887–1979), and J. J. P. Oud (1890–1963). The artistic philosophy that formed a basis for the group's work is known as neoplasticism—the new plastic art (or Nieuwe Beelding in Dutch). Piet Mondrian and Pétro (Nelly) van Doesburg in Mondrian's studio at Rue du Départ, Paris. 1923. Photo. Published (in altered form) in De Stijl, vol. VI, nr. 6/7 (1924): p. 86.

Happy Birthday George Washington: A Caricature look at some famous presidential faces

Happy Birthday George Washington: A Caricature look at some famous presidential faces

As a tribute to George Washington's Birthday, the first President of the United States, we put together a quirky little gallery of caricature portraits featuring some of America's famous presidential faces. A caricature is a simple image showing the features of its subject in an exaggerated way. In addition to exaggeration, caricatures differ wildly in style and technique but there are generally two additional elements transcending style and medium that must exist: likeness and statement, meaning the caricature must editorialize in some way. Some of the earliest caricatures are found in the works of Leonardo da Vinci, who actively sought people with deformities to use as models. The point was to offer an impression of the original which was more striking than a portrait. The art of caricature experienced its first successes in the closed aristocratic circles of France and Italy, where such portraits could be passed about for mutual enjoyment. While the first book on caricature drawing to be published in England was Mary Darly's A Book of Caricaturas (c. 1762), the first known North American caricatures were drawn in 1759 during the battle for Quebec. These caricatures were the work of Brig.-Gen. George Townshend whose caricatures of British General James Wolfe, depicted as "Deformed and crass and hideous" were drawn to amuse fellow officers. Elsewhere, two great practitioners of the art of caricature in 18th-century Britain were Thomas Rowlandson (1756–1827) and James Gillray (1757–1815). Rowlandson was more of an artist and his work took its inspiration mostly from the public at large. Gillray was more concerned with the vicious visual satirisation of political life. They were, however, great friends and caroused together in the pubs of London. We hope you get a giggle out of this gallery and for those reading in the US, Happy President's Day!

Design History: Dieter Rams - Less But Better

Pablo Picasso once said "Good Artists Copy Great Artists Steal" then Steve Jobs mention that in one interview long ago. We all know that Apple products are the best out there, there's no doubt about it, and the main reason about that is because they have the best design. Jonhathan Ive, the chief industrial designer at Apple is a fantastic designer but it's always good to know what and who inspired him to come up with the Apple product designs. We might think that they are pretty unique and new but when we look at Dieter Rams the Pablo Picasso's quote makes even more sense. About Dieter Rams (Wikipedia) Dieter Rams (born May 20, 1932 in Wiesbaden, Hesse) is a German industrial designer closely associated with the consumer products company Braun and the Functionalist school of industrial design. Rams studied architecture at the Werkkunstschule Wiesbaden as well as learning carpentry from 1943 to 1957. After working for the architect Otto Apel between 1953 and 1955 he joined the electronic devices manufacturer Braun where he became chief of design in 1961, a position he kept until 1995. Rams once explained his design approach in the phrase "Weniger, aber besser" which freely translates as "Less, but better". Rams and his staff designed many memorable products for Braun including the famous SK-4 record player and the high-quality 'D'-series (D45, D46) of 35 mm film slide projectors. He is also known for designing the 606 Universal Shelving System by Vitsœ in 1960. Rams' ten principles to "good design" is innovative makes a product useful is aesthetic makes a product understandable is unobtrusive is honest is long-lasting is thorough down to the last detail is environmentally friendly is as little design as possible Video About Dieter Rams Works Further reading DIETER RAMS: Less But Better Seperated At Birth? Dieter Rams and Apple’s Ive “The man behind Apple’s design magic” Dieter Rams - Design Museum Dieter Rams: “Less, but better.” Designboom - dieter rams

Olympic Poster Design over the last 112 years

As the Summer Olympics draws near every aspect of popular culture tends to involve itself in it. The design world especially plays an important part in inspiring people to get excited about the games. Recently there was a book released called "A Century of Olympic Posters" (which was mentioned in Fabiano's Best of the Week #18 post back in June). I've actually never seen the book, but I found that I didn't actually need it to see all the posters. Wikipedia has them all easily accessible. Looking through these posters is great because it's like looking at a timeline of the changes and innovations in Graphic Design. Some of my favorites are: 1912 - I love the 1912 one because it has a sort of Art Nouveau look to it, which is pretty appropriate for the time. 1924 - This poster almost seems like a German or Soviet propaganda poster. 1956 - Here we see a departure from depicting the usual roman statuesque male form that was part of the posters since 1908. In fact in completely removes any natural form. 1968 - I'm totally digging this Mexico '68 poster. 1988 - this one is in almost classic 1980's style. It looks like they actually used early computer graphics to make this. 1896 1900 1904 1908 1912 1920 1924 1928 1932 1936 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 1968 1972 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 source: haha.nu