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Interview with Short

Interview with Short

Davy Le Chevance aka. Short is a illustrator / graphic designer from Saint-Brieuc, France well known for his interesting and precisely crafted typography and characters. Today we're glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Short on the following links: Website Behance Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and typography? Thank you to you. I love the drawing / illustration forever. I started drawing at school and I never stopped. My interest in typography came later when I discovered the graffiti and also when I started studying graphic design. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? I like many styles and very different artists whether in comics, graphic design, graffiti. it would not be there instead of all the quote. 3) Your style is quite influenced by skateboard graphics and poster art. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? I will not describe, I do not feel I have a "style". I just tried to make strongs pictures. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. The method is always the same, it consists of four steps. 1- Layouts sketches: I quickly drew several small layouts sketches from the idea or brief that I, the goal is to find the best composition. This is a very important step if you don't have in a good composition it is useless to go further. 2- sketches / Drawing: always with paper and pencil I add details to the layout sketches that I choose. 3- Inking / Vectors: I scan my drawing and I redessinne in Illustrator or parfais I inking a hand with a brush. 4- Color: I put the color most often with the computer. 5) What's the best thing about working with illustration and what is the worst? The best thing: be proud of the work that is done to. The worst: Don't like a piece that I done. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have any hobbies? I work an big part of the day and chill the rest. I play basketball weekly. 7) What is your favorite media so far? The textile. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. Work Work Work Work and Work again. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. http://www.fffffound.com/ http://www.behance.net/ http://www.wall-mag.com/ http://www.basketsession.com/ http://www.mightyshort.com/ 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Just believe in yourself!

Interview with Saturno AGS

Interview with Saturno AGS

Mixed media seems to be the future of the graphic area, even If you're a great traditional illustrator you should go learn some digital tools and vice versa. Saturno AGS is one of this prolific multimedia artists who can go from digital art to graffiti without too much effort. Today we're glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Saturno AGS on the following links: Website Behance Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for graffiti and illustration? Firstly thank you for the opportunity to spread a little bit of my work. As a child I was always a bad student and what I wanted to do and be was an artist. Always caught my attention the murals and graffiti I saw on the street. It was at high school when I started buying paint cans with the little pocket money that my parents could give me. For me it was the perfect occasion to give free rein to play to my artistic concerns. I always liked doing illustration,since I saw the first videogames covers and VHS films covers, it is a world that I love and being able to express things in a creative way, my point of view and add my personal touch is a challenge and something realy fascinating for me. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? When I started to paint graffiti the people that I used to admire are quite different from the interests that I have nowadays, but there´s one in particular that I always liked a lot and keeps on surprising me when he paints graffiti and as well as doing other kind of art or illustration: Ata Bozaci (TOAST One ). On the other hand there are some others that have marked my carrier in one way or another: Frank Frazzeta, Jim Murray, Simon Bisley, Adam Hughes, Alex Trochut, Stan Winston, Chiodo Brothers ... But it is impossible to just say a few names, as there are many more! 3) Your style is quite influenced by character design and realism. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? My style comes from science fiction movies of the 80s and 90s and arcade games machines. When I was little, I lived on the second floor of a bar that my parents ran. The pub was placed between two video stores. The treatment they had with me was specially nice because I was the owner´s son of the pub and we were neighbours, so I could spend hours and hours looking at the film covers and posters in those two stores. Down in the same street, there was another costumer of my parent´s pub patrons were running one of the biggest arcade game store I've ever seen. On Saturday mornings the owner used to come for breakfast and then I used to go with him to his shop where he gave me 20 free credits for the machine I chose, always the same: SPACE INVADERS ... hehe. I could barely reach the controls and I had to use a chair. So I would say my style is dynamic and tells its meanings directly through each drawing, I consider myself more an illustrator than an artist who wants to say something using hidden meanings for not being so obvious...sometimes my illustrations are aggressive and other more naughty, but always it comes from those memories from my childhood. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I start thinking about the main idea, then I see if I can add or remove items to make it dynamic in regards of composition or form. Sometimes it goes on the fly, but sometimes it comes to something more elaborate that needs to be preparing some sketches and color tests before the final design. I think that when the work of an artist is spontaneous is like the acoustic guitar of a musician, an instrument that you can play anywhere without guidelines, and that is in those moments when you really see the depth of the artist when it comes to express, the resources gained in other jobs and knowledge of how to mix the different techniques and media, are visible. I believe that an artist has to be like fighter expert in many different kind of martial arts (but always faithful for himself), to know how to handle different tasks when creating, knowledge is important, learning is important but what is difficult is to apply this knowledge at the certain time needed but retaining the personal touch. 5) As every artist, you've gone thru bad and good moments on your career, please share with us one of your turning point moments. I would not know specifically which points have changed my career, I could say that the daily effort makes you grow as an artist and gradually stand out from the rest. If I have to talk about my own career I can say it has not been easy as I always had to combine my artistic side with work with no connection to art for being able to survive. And continues to be difficult and in some cases disheartening, but as I said, it is a journey where you learn and constantly evolve if you work hard to finally get your own place sooner or later. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have any hobbies? I try to complete all the weekly targets, being on time with customers and dead lines and fulfill my own goals. One of my hobbies is making music (musical production) but lately I haven´t done much and in the little free time I can make I go out to paint, usually with other friends. I also love spending time with my 4 cats :) 7) We've seen a boom on street art and graffiti on the last 5 years, tells us your opinion about it. True, more and more people are interested in this medium, thanks to the internet people can see everything that happens in real time, and not like before it was something taboo and only a minority had the chace to practice it. In addition to very talented people who set the bar ever higher and the variety of styles is wide. I like it to be that way, so it means that many interesting things are to come. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every artist. Be true to your work and what you are, do not fall into clichés and fads. Amaze, try to improve yourself in every job no matter how small and don´t settle for little. Nothing is for free so work hard and a lot. Think before you act, take your time, the result will talk for you. Evolves. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit http://www.behance.com/ http://www.xlr8r.com/ https://www.facebook.com/superani.jg/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/rabodiga/ http://disneyscreencaps.com/ 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Try to always be happy doing what you love and work hard and hopeful. Good things are achieved with effort, nobody said it was easy ;)

A little conversation with Tarin Yuangtrakul aka. Tab

A little conversation with Tarin Yuangtrakul aka. Tab

Some people might say that talented artists take a life-time to make great work and to be discovered, I quite disagree with that. As young talents as Tarin show us that it's really more about dedication and a bit of luck to be sucessful nowadays. Today we're glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Tarin on the following links: Website Behance Facebook Twitter Tumblr 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks. Actually, it started in my high school time. When I was preparing for attending to a university. In that time, I was really free, so I always drew pictures in my classroom. Fortunately, back in 2009, I found Behance (an online portfolio site). I decided to publish some of my artworks there to get feedbacks. Moreover, Behance gave me opportunities and exposure. I had chances to work with people I did not even know for various projects. Personally, my career began from that moment. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. Currently, I am a graphic design student. Every work day I go to the university then back home in the evening, spend most of my free time at night on the internet like other people; facebooking, chatting, and listening to music or playing some games. Besides, I always check out fresh artworks, designs, and find a few hours to do my work every day. My weekend is mostly for sleeping(lol). 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. Of course, I play the guitar often, sing some songs, drawing picture (in relaxing way), reading books (rarely), and listen to music I like: from smooth Classical (especially piano instrumental) to Black Metal. 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? Improvement never finishes. There are so many things I have to learn about. In creative fields, I think am just a tiny point among a large group of points. Exploring new fields is always interesting for me. That is why I create illustrations, fonts, logo designs, and even write songs. In the next five years or a decade, the dots are connecting with each other gradually and keep growing. In my point of view, creative industries is needed for everyone. They are in our daily lives. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. - Don't give up! - If you are not at the lowest point, do not cite any excuse. - Do what you love. - Be responsible. - Happiness is the most important thing. 6) What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? The best thing is definitely what I love to do. I can practice myself. It can help growing the creative community and furthermore let people realize about creative work that is surrounding them. On the other hand, the worst thing is: our community is like behind-the-scene people. Most of people do not know what we do. This is what I have experienced in my country. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? For me, my parent are my heroes all the time. They teach me many things about how to live and work. They are also designers--my mom is an interior designer and my dad is an architect. No doubt why I end up like this(lol). I usually like to watch beside them while they are working until today. I can learn something from it. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now. Now I feel like I am fine and happy with my life, but there are always things disturbing my happiness. 9) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: Noodles - A Animal: Snow wolf - A Color: Black & White - A Tool: Pencil - A Person: Myself - A Place: Home - A Song: Can You Feel My Heart by Bring Me The Horizon - A Movie: Spirited Away, The Omen, The Social Network - A Book: Making Ideas Happen by Scott Belsky - A Quote: "Imagination is more important than knowledge." - Albert Einstein, "The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it." - Michelangelo 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. Be confident of what you do and don't give up! Now I am working on scarf illustrations, an illustration for a magazine cover, and more to come! Please stay in touch, thank you so much! :)

Interview with Sara Blake (aka. ZSO)

Interview with Sara Blake (aka. ZSO)

We already feature the outstanding work of Sara Blake on our blog, we have been watching her evolution during all this years on becoming a great illustrator and today we had the pleasure to make this interview with her. Sara Blake is a designer and illustrator based in New York city, USA, she is also know as ZSO. You can see more from Sara Blake on the following links: Website ZSO NYC Twitter Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and art? Thanks YOU so much! The honor is all mine. I guess ever since I was a little kid art was my main interest. I was always into playing outside, and getting dirty, and I have always been a big introvert so I liked activities that I could quietly focus on alone. My parents always encouraged me in the arts I think for 2 reasons: they knew that I was already very shy, and I also had eye surgery for a problematic lazy eye. I was very near sighted, and self conscious, and wore an eye patch for about a year, which I think probably made it a little harder to make friends when I was little. I always just liked making stuff, plain and simple. My parents always put focus on getting a good education, but never on an actual career, so I think I was able to find clarity in what I liked to do but not how to survive off of it. I had no idea how I would actually make a living doing illustration until pretty late in the game. It worked itself out later I guess. 2) Which artists do you use as reference? Lots of old nature study illustrations from Ernst Haeckel and Alberta Seba, and I also love ukiyo-e artists like Hiroshige and Utamaro. I'm also pretty in love with minhwa Korean folk art. It's so playful and naive. The distortions and abstractions make my heart do somersaults. 3) Your style is quite influenced by watercolors and realism. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? It's always really fun for me to hear how others describe and see my work. For me, I actually don't feel like my art is very realistic at all, and I always really struggle when I get a brief asking for realistic representations. Over the the years I've gotten a lot of work doing portraiture where I have to capture a likeness, which is always a challenge. When I first started out I loved drawing girls as a subject matter, and one of the first portraits I ever did in what I consider my style now was of drawing of my sister. The likeness was close enough, but there was definitely an element of distortion—and the colors I choose are never realistic. The portraits I end up liking the most tend to be the most far from reality. I tend to pick a feature and really blow it out—for instance enlarging the eyes, tightening the mouth, or really abstracting the hair etc. In general I think my visual interests have become more about pattern, color, and texture, than subject matter. I've sort of realized this in the past few years by reflecting on my own personal art collection of other people's work. I have a lot of old folk art and abstract art. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. I tend to start just with blank sheet of paper, a rough idea of subject matter, and some good music, and I work out composition as I go by drawing very lightly and erasing. I generally don't feel a lot of pressure to have something perfect worked out on paper because all my work I then scan and ultimately adjust and color digitally. Here I can add a lot of depth and color that can help or rework things that may not have been successful as a pencil drawing alone. I like to document my process the whole way through as much as possible. Sometimes it helps to step away, then come back to look at your steps to tell you if you've gone too far and perhaps need to back up and simplify. 5) What's the best thing about working with illustration and what is the worst? Best thing is definitely the creative freedom. I've always made a point to have other design work that helps pays my bills and being able to draw what and how I want has become very sacred to me. I believe and have also been taught from my mentors that if you do the kind of work that you want to do, that's the kind of work you end of getting hired to do. Hmmm, a worst part? There isn't a worst part. I love illustration! I guess the worst part would be the inverse of the best part... when you have a job that turns on you, you no longer like the actual work, and you temporarily don't like to do illustration... 6) How do you describe your daily routine? I'm definitely a creature of habit and I have a pretty regular schedule. The hours of 9 - 6 I do graphic design for a digital agency I've been with for years, then I take a little break, get in a good workout (running or biking), grab my dinner, and then draw until bed, usually pretty late. I'm the kind of person where the busier I make myself, the more I actually get done. It's "the more you do, the more you do" outlook I guess. If I don't have a healthy to do list at all times and set of goals, I sort of lose my sense of purpose very quickly. With that said, I think I've also gotten a lot better at relaxing lately. I'm learning that taking breaks is JUST as an important part of the creative process. Naps. Reading books. Meandering strolls. Maybe I'm just getting old, but rest is important! 7) Tell us more about the idea behind ZSO-NYC. ZSO-NYC is my itty-bitty textile company that so far has only released and sold out of one scarf design, which was released this time last year. I manage the whole thing from the design to the production to the website and sales, so it's been a slow, laborious but also very rewarding project. It started just as a personal experiment to print on fabric to see 1) how my color translated to silk and 2) to see how once my patterns and textures were translated to a movable 3D surface, how it could sort of be reinvented with movement. It was also an exercise in getting away from commercial illustration, but still creating something that people could consume and interact with. It's still a very small project and I'm currently in the works of launching 3 more designs this year. It's going to have a pretty non-traditional launch which I'm pretty excited about... but I can't reveal much more than that! I also hear that Abduzeedo may be interested in a little ZSO-NYC scarf giveaway for the next release, so stay tuned about that!8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. 1) If you can let go of fear of failure, you are free. 2) Separate the kind of work you want to do from the need to make money. 3) Explore the world. Inspiration is hiding everywhere. 4) Sleep enough (I didn't learn this until pretty late, but now I'm loving it) 5) Collaborate with your peers. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit NY Times, Craigslist, Gus the Fox, The Fox is Black (two very different site with fox names hahaha!), Pinterest (I'm obsessed with Pinterest!!!) and then I like to keep tabs on a few artists who keep great blogs like Pat Perry, Teagan White, and Darren Booth, among many others. 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Do and make what you love, period. Work hard, work long hours, and make a lot of work because it's all about practice, and also don't get discouraged because illustration is a tough, inconsistent business. If you're not doing it because you love it, it might not be for you. I never thought everyone had to love their job—after all, they call it work for a reason—but I think illustration is definitely one of those careers you have to be in love with! Wake up with stars in your eyes and butterflies in your stomach!

A little conversation with Alexis Marcou

A little conversation with Alexis Marcou

I'm huge enthusiast of realistic artworks, don't know why exactly, but I think that the idea of imperfect and non-photographic representation really teases me. Although I must say that just being a representation is not enough to please people. It must have soul, as the artworks designed by our pal Alexis Marcou.. Today we're glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Alexis on the following links: Website Behance Facebook Twitter Tumblr 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and art? I would also like to thank you for your interest in my work. Although I started drawing when I was very young I became interested professionally around 2007. Alexis's earlier work2) Which artists do you use as reference? I use music as my reference a lot. Some of it includes Pink Floyd, Daft Punk, Mogwai and M83. 3) Your style is quite influenced by realism and graphic design. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? The style was developed very gradually through practice and experimentation. I never describe my style as I wouldn't want to stereotype it. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. The research is the first step. I try to find a good photo to use as my reference if a given client hasn't provided one. I begin the illustration and get feedback at this stage as it is easier to make changes at this stage. once approved i move on to finalising the illustration. When I am done I scan the illustration into Photoshop. I digitally process it and in some cases I go back to the illustration again and rescan it on photoshop for a newer update. Photoshop helps me visualize the illustration as a final piece in many cases. 5)What's the best thing about working with illustration and what is the worst? From the many positives I think the most important is that it's not boring. You get to work with lots of different people who work for various companies and each project is unique. It is also up to the illustrator to avoid boredom by not being repetitive. Even if the client asks for you to almost repeat something that you have done before in the past you will agree but never 'listen'. An artist can never be completely controlled and that is why it never gets boring. The worst is definitely the very long hours spent in front of a computer screen. 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have any hobbies? I would say it varies. Each day is different depending on what i am working on. Most days i illustrate either by hand or digitally and try to keep on top of my emails. I like listening to music, running, taking photos and I like watching movies. 7) You're a multimedia artist, but talking about techniques, what is your favorite so far? All of my work is based on graphite, so any technique that relates to graphite is a favorite. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. I will tell you five things that I do but this of course doesn't mean that every illustrator will find helpful. - Be organized. - Expose your work - not you and your personal life. - Listen to your client. - Do some research before starting a job. - Try running to get away from it all for a while. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. 1. http://www.behance.net/ 2. http://www.ted.com/ 3. http://society6.com/ 4. http://www.yatzer.com/ 5. http://designcollector.net/ 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Risk!

A little conversation with Fabian Ciraolo

We already featured the art of Fabian Ciraolo on our blog and today we had the opportunity to have a little conversation with this artist. So please take a sit and enjoy the interview, hope you guys get some good tips and insights from this. You can see more of illustrations at his Official Blog, his Behance Profile or you can also follow him on Twitter. Some of Fabian artworks.1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? I´ve been around painting/art all my life, my father was the person that took me been very little, to different art shows, was interesting to me looking at amazing works been so young; artists like Goya, Frida, Dalí... This changed my mind. I sold my first work at the age of 10, It was a portrait of a family friend. Didn't understand why someone could give me money for something I was doing since I have memory, so natural for me. This episode give the thought that I want to do this for the rest of my life and get payed for it, been really little. I always have in mind that I want to draw what I want to, how I want to, this is my main speech till these days, but first, I have to make people crazy for my art. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. Luckily, I always wake up with some new ideas, so my mornings usually starts with a lot of drawings and puttings new ideas on paper, lot of coffee and loud music. I try to make all my days different, not much fan of routine, try to make my day interesting to myself. Anyway, my days/nights involve: a lot of drawing, lot of coffee, drums, music and friends. 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. I play drums in my band, called OH MARGOT, we are working now in our first big album, hope it sees the light in the middle of this year. 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? I think the most exiting part of what I do is not knowing what I will be doing in the future, that keeps me interesting in this. As a professional; this year is with a lot of projects, lot of album covers (with I love to do), but mainly, taking my exhibition to different countries, take my art from the web and let people see it hanging on a wall. As a person; I just hope to be alive in 5 years. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. 1- Work your ass off for what you want. 2- Make mistakes, make a lot of mistakes and learn from them. 3- Draw for yourself, not for what you "think" people want to see. 4- If you copy, do it a hundred times better. 5- Never underestimate the value of your work, for anyone. 6)What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? The best thing is the daily freedom, the pleasure of doing what i love most in life. Waking up everyday to explore new things. The worst; the "business" 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? The only heroes in my life are my parents, I am and I do what I do today just because they have always believe in me no matter what. 8) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: My girlfriend´s homemade Hamburgers - A Animal: Dalí rhinoceroses - A Color: Black - A Tool: My right hand - A Person: Can´t pick just one. Impossible. - A Place: My studio - A Song: Friends - "I'm His Girl" - A Movie: Miyazaki´s Spirited Away - A Book: I am a really bad reader. I prefer to look. - A Quote: "Good artists copy, great artists steal" - Pablo Picasso 9) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. If you are starting in this, take your time, work hard, make mistakes, work HARDER, be your own judge, get obsessed with your art.

Interview with Grzegorz Domaradzki aka. Gabz

Interview with Grzegorz Domaradzki aka. Gabz

If you're updated with the digital art world you certainly already know the illustrator and designer Gabz, we featured his artworks several times on Abduzeedo. Today we're lucky and glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Gabz on the following links: Website Behance Facebook 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and art started? I'm the one who should thank for the interest in interviewing me. I'm that type of guy, or a geek if you prefer, that always was very much into drawing and basically everything image related, so it's hard to point out a particular moment when it all started... To make things easier, I can say that I started thinking about doing this for the rest of my life somewhere around the end of primary school. I knew by then I had some unpolished talent and that it wouldn't be smart to waste it. I was very much into comics back then. Well I still am. Later in high school I discovered Renaissance and other all time masters and knew exactly what I wanted to do in future. Then came Academy of Fine Arts in my home town Poznan where I did my first steps in printing techniques such as dry point, linocut, serigraphy among others, and mediums like painting, sculpture, book illustration, poster and so on. I guess you can say "the rest is history":) 2) Which artists do you use as reference? There is quite a number of artists, designers and finally design studios I follow. I believe one cannot really improve without looking up into people whose work you appreciate and admire. Getting more and more involved in poster print community, I have a huge respect for Martin Ansin's work among many other great artists (Tyler Stout, Jay Shaw and more). His style, compositions and approach to both detail and typography is highly inspiring. Other great illustrators I greatly enjoy are Jesse Auersalo, Von, Mario Hugo, MVM and Alex Trochut to name the few. They are all original in their own way, constantly producing great and inspiring stuff. Hats off to these guys! 3) Your style is quite influenced by movie posters and realism. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it? Indeed, I'm very much into realism and figuration in general. If you mean the style I use in the poster prints I produce: it all started with some experiments I did in Illustrator using Pencil Tool. I discovered that spontaneously created shapes over the reverence photograph found on the web, can give some really rich and original effects. It was in 2008 when I created a personal project titled Vector Movie Posters, which was the first time I have officially used those vector based portraits while creating a series of posters for my favorite movies. Luckily, it got recognized and people seemed to like what I did there. Two years later a gave the project a second go, with the style being more polished and detailed, and the posters much more thought through. Some time later I have quit using Illustrator and started using Lasso Tool in Photoshop instead, which made creating highly complexed artworks easier and more efficient. Recently I have been developing yet another adjustment to this style by applying dissolved gradients among some simplification to the main line work. I hope I'm moving the right way... 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece. Collecting some reference pictures and ideas is always a good start. When it is a movie related artwork, I do browse search for images related to the particular title, including main characters and often huge number of screen grabs I find a possible perfect fit for the later artwork. It wouldn't be much though if I didn't make some rough sketches and initial concepts first. They are usually highly simplified and not really worth sharing I'm afraid. I then bring the process to Photoshop where I try to make the digital sketch as attractive and finished-looking as a sketch can be. Only when I feel the sketch is looking sharp and original I send it to the client for approval and proceed with the finalization. The delivery process depends on the technique, while the pencil based artworks may seem time absorbing, in fact come to life in a week or so, those that are to be screen printed and need a color separation may take up to 3 weeks tops. Final typography treatment always come at the very end, and includes either browsing through the font library and picking a perfect fit or designing a custom font from the scratch. It's the hardest part of creating process for me and I often catch myself on regretting not having spend more time on that or doing stuff differently. 5)What's the best thing about working with illustration and what is the worst? In illustration only the subject if commissioned and your imagination is the limit. There is nothing else between you an an empty sheet of paper or your screen canvas. You can stick to one or mix styles and mediums. Create abstract or realistic forms, or do both at a time. Create simple or complex compositions, by combining different elements and applying digital objects. Play with plenty of colors, or use a monochromatic palette. I mean what's here to hate? 6) How do you describe your daily routine? Do you have any hobbies? My daily routine isn't anything special I suppose. I start off by browsing through sites that inspire me. Then I answer all emails and start the work, which includes either sketching or finalizing ongoing projects. With a lunch break in between I work up to 10 hours per day usually, though tight timeline commissions do happen every now and then. If necessary, I don't have any problems with working very long hours. When the work is done, I try to spend as much time as possible with my wife or my family and friends. Cinema and basically movies are on my priority list, when it comes to what I enjoy doing in a free time. But I also find time for reading and occasional live concerts. Finally, I feel obliged to mention my slight gaming addiction: I highly enjoy playing first person shooter games on PS3. 7) You're a multimedia artist, but talking about techniques, what is your favorite so far? I do operate in various mediums ranging from pencil and acrylic paint for example to fully digital or vector based artworks. But I can easily name two styles that I find most enjoyable for me at this point. First one would be a mix of traditional pencil drawing with digital remastering, including coloring, filters, textures and all sort of other effects applied in Adobe Photoshop.My second favorite style is precisely described above. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator. These tips are pretty similar for all creative fields and I know I'm not discovering anything new here. Here goes: 1 - Stay inspired! Follow other peoples work, experiment, learn and improve your skills wether in traditional or digital mediums you're using. 2 - Try working only on the projects that excite you and allow you to improve your skills and push forward. Your work will be just as good as how you feel about doing it. 3 - Don't try to be good at something... try to be the best! Instead of doing a lot of different things unremarkably, stick or find that one or those few that you rock in. 4 - Let the world see you - create a simple and user friendly online portfolio with selection of works that you find best - After all, you want your future clients to see only the works that you are truly proud of! 5 - Work hard. Cause hard work pays off. Period. 9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit I visit plenty of sites daily, among those viewed randomly, there are at least a couple I visit everyday: 1 - Ffffound - Site with loads of new images added everyday is a huge inspirational boost. 2 - September Industry - Unfortunately this site is no longer updated as frequently as it was, but it still remains one of my all time favorite when it comes to graphic design inspiration sites! Brilliant selection of projects, studios and graphic designers all around with an easy to find sections on top of that. 3 - It's Nice That - Design blog, with interesting news from design/art community and often great selection of artists to follow. 4 - Expresso Beans - Though in my opinion this site isn't really an example of a strong web design, I still visit this one pretty often: Mainly, to keep up with the newest trends in the so called poster community and of course to know what other artists produce. I have been following some of them for a while now. All members are allowed to comment newest releases, so it's also pretty interesting to know the feedback form art collectors. 5 - Last but not least, one of my favorite agencies Hort. Ok, so I do not visit their site everyday, nor they need any more recognition, but I just love what these guys do and how they manage to combine creative freedom with client guidelines and expectations, and in the end, deliver brave, strong and awesomely executed stuff. 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business. Summing up: Stay inspired, experiment, always improve, work hard, share your work and good luck!

A little conversation with Sakke Soini

A little conversation with Sakke Soini

Years ago the design community saw I rise of 80's inspiration on many designers and illustrators porfolios, you may know the work of Sakke Soini from this time. From that time to now, Sakke got more and more involved with a retro aesthetic, but at the same time tried to learn new skills and references.. Today we're lucky and glad to receive this written interview with him, hope you guys enjoy it. You can see more from Sakke on the following links: Website Behance Facebook Twitter 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks. My pleasure! I started making digital art with my Commodore Amiga 500, with a program called Deluxe Paint in the 90s, when still in elementary school. But after awhile that it sort of faded into the background and other interests took its place. In around 2005/2006 I started learning Photoshop more seriously, I had done website layouts and smaller stuff before that, but not illustrations. I was experimenting with a lot of many different techniques like the picture attached here. This was actually my first print job and it was in the beginning of 2007. As for actual projects, like everyone else I started out small, making websites for my friend’s bands and flyers for parties and slowly bettering myself. While I was practicing and making these small commissions I had to make ends meet by working as a bartender. I would say that I started making a living, although not a very good one, doing solely this in 2008. Let's just say I was close to going back to school and finishing my Master's Degree on International Business. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. I share a workplace with a few other freelancers here in Helsinki, Finland. This place actually used to be an old wrestling hall with sauna. Wrestling hall is replaced by a photo studio, I have my desk where the showers used to be and the sauna is a chill out place. Atmosphere here is really relaxed and I have spent countless nights here meeting the next mornings deadlines. My daily routine pretty much consists of me taking my bike (when the roads are not covered in ice and snow) and leaving my place around 8-10, hitting the gym on the way to my studio and staying there until about seven. I usually try to do the little things out of the way before noon, then having lunch somewhere near by and then focusing on the bigger projects. Also the occasional small nap after lunch. I mean, what's the point being a freelancer if you cannot take a small nap every once in awhile! 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. Like I mentioned above, I like going to the gym and riding my bike. I love video-games particularly games like Dark Souls and Demon's Souls. I VJ a couple of times a month, plus I run a few club nights with friends here in Helsinki. And who doesn't love travelling? I take a month off per year during the winter time and go travelling in places like India or Thailand. Next I think I would like to go South-America. 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? I am always trying to improve and starting to learn 3D in 2011 has really changed the way I work. I love to always improve and get better. Also I have been moving towards video work and motion graphics more and more (new video we made just released this week: http://vimeo.com/64530681), but I still like doing graphic design and illustrations the best. As a person I have been making a huge leap towards more healthier lifestyle, working out, eating better, cutting back on the nightlife. I ain't getting any younger! As for the future it will be quite interesting to see what is going to happen in 5 years. Technology is moving so fast. A lot of my work is magazine based at the moment, but we all know that printed magazines are slowly making the switch into the digital domain. Of course there will always be a need for graphic design, but it is only a matter of time when advertising illustrations for example will switch from static posters into moving images. We will have to see how that will play out. Also I am very excited to see what kind of possibilities 3D printing bring. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. 1) Learn to say "NO" 2) Slow down. Work is not everything. You need to find balance between work and personal life. I have been in the verge of a burnout and it ain't no joke. 3) You can't polish a turd. Sometimes you just have to let go and start over. No matter how frustrating that is. 4) Learn about freelancing rates. Don't sell your work for too cheap. 5) Don't work at home. As soon as it is possible get a work space. 6)What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? Best thing is being your own boss and doing what I love. There always has to be a flip side though, the worst thing is the uncertainty that comes with running your own one man business. I have been very lucky to have worked with so many great clients, but there is always that fear in the back of your head that what if one day the clients just stop calling. What then? Going to work for someone else? Change careers? That uncertainty is the price every freelancer has to pay. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? There are many artists and people who I admire and who inspire me. If I had to pick one artist, I would go with the late Jean Giraud (Mœbius). I enjoyed his works immensely growing up, and still do of course. The colorful dreamlike worlds he created were straight out of my own sub-conscious. I would get lost for hours in his works. Also I adore the works of Takashi Murakami, he is definitely one of my favourite contemporary artists. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now. 9) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: Some of my favourites are: Gai Pad Graprow (stir fried chicken with holy basil and chili), and new potatoes, pickled herring and eggs. - A Animal: Otter - A Color: I never had a favorite color. I love all of them. - A Tool: Akai LPD8 - A Person: Girlfriend - A Place: Anywhere by the sea really, especially during dusk. - A Song: Talking Heads - This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody) - A Movie: Office Space - A Book: Necronomicon: The Best Weird Tales of H.P. Lovecraft - A Quote: "If less is more, then think how much more more would be!" - Frasier Crane 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. No problem! I would have to say: stick to it! I know it may sometimes seem bleak, especially when you are first starting up, but if you are working hard and giving your best eventually it will pay off. Also a good tip would be when going into full time freelancing, be sure to have your finances covered for at least the next three months. This way you aren't immediately thinking where's the next months rent is coming from and you can concentrate on getting clients and getting your name out there. Good luck!

A little conversation with Lauren Nicole Hom

A little conversation with Lauren Nicole Hom

I'm tumblr addict and other day I just stumbled with a blog called Daily Dishonesty, a parody of quotes we use for ourselves day-by-day. For my surprise the owner of the blog is Lauren Nicole Hom, a young graphic designer and art director from NY, USA and also one of the main speakers of Montreal Meets 3. Today we had the opportunity to have a little conversation with her, so please take a sit and enjoy the interview, hope you guys get some good tips and insights from it. You can see more from Lauren at the following links: homsweethom.com laurennicolehom.com Daily Dishonesty 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you t. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks Thanks for having me! I guess it's easy for me to talk about the beginning of my career because that's exactly where I'm at. I'll be graduating from the advertising and graphic design program at the School of Visual Arts in about a month, and I couldn't be more excited. I began my freelance career about two years into school, designing vector art and wedding invitations. Most of my first design jobs I found on Craigslist actually haha…everyone's got to start somewhere, right? 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. Well, I'm a part-time freelance designer, so I work from my little desk at home. I always start the day with a cup of green tea and a smoothie. I keep a pretty tight to-do list on my desktop that's organized by the day and week. If there's any sketching, drawing, or hand lettering work to be done, I do those things first. There's something nice about starting the day with a pencil and paper, since I spend so much time staring at a computer screen. My daily routine is mostly made up of designing, corresponding with clients, and eating haha. I try to leave the apartment to get some fresh air and walk around as much as possible too. The streets of New York are much more inspiring than a computer screen will ever be. 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. When I'm not designing, you can find me in the kitchen. Cooking and baking have always been favorite hobbies of mine. I've found that I'm happiest when I'm creating, whether it be a poster or a chocolate cake. I'm also equally as happy when I'm eating that chocolate cake. 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? Professionally, the next step for me will be finding an agency or studio that I want to work for full-time. Or there's always the possibility of freelancing full-time. I'm completely open to all the possibilities that lay ahead. You could say that my personal goals are intertwined with my professional goals, because I want to follow through on a bunch of personal design projects this summer. It feels like there's never enough time to do all of the things I want to do; one of the gifts/curses of being creative is that it never shuts off. As for my creative field, I'm sure there will be new innovations and trends over the next five years. However, I think that at the core of every great design is an even greater idea, and that will never change. Designers were coming up with just as many great ideas 50 years ago as designers will be coming up with in the next 50 years. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. - The internet is AMAZING. Get your work out there. No one cares if you're brilliant if no one knows who you are. - Find inspiration away from your computer - read books at the library, walk around and study signage, go to a concert. That's where the good stuff is, not in pixels. - Make business cards and always have a few with you. You never know who you're going to meet. - Try to only work on clients/projects that get you excited. It'll help steer your portfolio in the right direction, and you'll be a happier and more sane designer. - Work hard. Snack often. 6) What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? The best thing: being able to work in my pajamas. The worst thing: I'm always wearing pajamas. Just kidding…my best thing about working as a designer is that I get to be creative and pay the bills by making beautiful, fun things. Honestly, I can't think of a "worst" thing about the business. I really do enjoy it all…the process, the clients, everything. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? My design heroes are Louise Fili and Gail Anderson. I took Gail's communication design class during my third year at SVA, and it was one of the best decisions I ever made. She introduced me to Louise, and I interned for her for a semester. They've both accomplished so much, and it's because they've stayed true to what they love. Gail does a lot of playful work with type, found objects, and illustration. Louise works heavily with type and creates beautiful identities for restaurants and gourmet brands, all with an Italian touch. When looking at their work, you can see what they're passionate about and feel their personalities, which is what I aspire to achieve. Gail AndersonLouise Fili8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now 9) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: grilled cheese - A Animal: chow chow - A Color: chartreuse - A Tool: my trusty Wacom tablet - A Person: Julia Child - A Place: underneath the covers - A Song: happy birthday to you... - A Movie: Totoro - A Book: High Fidelity by Nick Hornby A Quote: "It doesn't matter if the glass is half empty or half full. There is clearly room for more wine." - a very wise person 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. It was my pleasure! My last message to designers who are starting out is a silly, but true one: Think of your design as a person you're going on a date with. If they're very attractive but have no substance or personality, you won't be interested for more than a night. If they're very smart and interesting but you're not attracted to them, you probably won't call them again. However, when you meet that person who's got the beauty and the brains…that's when you'll stick around. A beautiful design without a great idea won't be remembered, and a great idea without a beautiful design won't be noticed. My point is this: Design things you would want to date. Hell, make designs you'd want to put a ring on. That's what you should aim to do.

A little conversation with Tyler Stout

A little conversation with Tyler Stout

You probably already stumbled with the amazing movie posters of Tyler Stout, If not you should see what this guy is capable. Today we had the opportunity to have a little conversation with this illustrator. So please take a sit and enjoy the interview, hope you guys get some good tips and insights from this. You can see more from Tyler at his Official Website Some movie posters designed by Tyler.1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks. I started off doing 11x17 black and white flyers for some local music venues in seattle and portland, oregon. it kept going from there. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. I get up, say hello to my family, walk out to my studio (which used to be a garage), do some work, watch some movies, return some emails. at dinnertime my kids come get me and tell me its time to eat, I go back inside and eat dinner with them, hang out with family, then go to bed. 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. I’m not sure I really have any hobbies. I do things with my kids. I read books, comic books and regular books. I play video games. 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? I don’t have a long term plan really, I just do one job after the next, as they come up. hopefully in five years I’ll still be making a decent living doing what i do, still able to provide for my family, and be in good health. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. - Don’t put work in front of real life moments. - Don’t put work in front of taking care of your actual real life physical body - Don’t put money in front of making work you’re proud of - Don’t be afraid to turn down jobs you’re not sure of - Don’t sweat the critics, do work you believe in and it’ll work out. 6)What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? I like having my own schedule and being my own boss. unfortunately I am terrible at keeping a reasonable schedule and I am not a good boss. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? My grandparents. they loved me unconditionally and kept me from being a complete psychopath. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now 9) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: Sugar - A Animal: Bugs, bunnies - A Color: Black on black - A Tool: Maynard James Keenan - A Person: Louisa May Alcott - A Place: Brush Prairie, WA - A Song: Good Old Days - Weird Al - A Movie: Deep Rising - A Book: Gremlins by George Gipe - A Quote: “Not a woman?” - Llug 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. Let’s see....my final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business....would be....a picture of a small cat suspended by some sort of string or rope-like apparatus, and engraved underneath, written in an elegant, Future Condensed font (or possibly Avante Garde Medium Italic), would be this simple phrase - “Hang in there”.

A little conversation with Yu Cheng

A little conversation with Yu Cheng

We already featured the amazing talent of Yu Cheng on our blog and today we had the opportunity to have a little cconversation with this skillfull illustrator. So please take a sit and enjoy the interview, hope you guys get some good tips and insights from this. You can see more of Yu Cheng illustrations at his Official Website. 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks I remember I have been passionate for drawing since being a couple of feet tall, but started my design career about 9 years ago when I graduated from university school. My first job was at a cartoon animation studio in New Zealand, I've worked as a 3D modeler and sometimes help doing some animation clip. When work for a while, I found my passion is working for concept art and more realistic art style, so when I back to Taiwan, I try to find a concept art job in games and jump into game industry to start my illustrator and concept designer life. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. Daily Routine: Wake up, check emails > Doing research reference > Communicate with client > Go to CG resource website to see other people artworks > Drawing practice on paper > Work illustration for clients > Jogging everyday (when not raining) > Eat dinner > Still working > Take bath > Practice > Sleep…..Zzzz. 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. (Send us a picture of you while doing your hobby). Play games…. I guess….. 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? Hmmm……. I really don’t think that so far, I think I will still practice and paint more artwork , and hopefully I can have my art book and sell over the world to people who like my artworks. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. Keep healthy, do more painting. There is no start or stop, only doing. Wisdom is practice and doing You always need to practice, leave in this moment, not in the future or in the past. Be passionate, be patient. 6)What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? Best thing is the clients give me a lot space to doing what I want to do. Worst thing is the deadline is very short. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? Bouguereau William , he's my favorite artist, I really really like his paintings especially his color. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now Practice, Practice, Practice. 9) Now for some quick and short answers: A Food: Strawberry A Animal: Lion A Color: Black A Tool: Pencil, Digital pen A Person: Parents A Place: Taipei A Song: Coffee Break A Movie: Jurassic Park A Book: To many A Quote: Doing what you love 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. The practice makes it perfect !

A little conversation with Raku Inoue

A little conversation with Raku Inoue

I stumbled across the work of the impressive visual artist Raku Inoue through our editor's event, Montreal Meets. Raku it's a Canadian multi-media artist with a beautiful skill with sculpture. Today we had the opportunity to have a little conversation with Raku, so please take a sit and enjoy the interview, hope you guys get some good tips and insights from him. You can see more from Raku at the following links: Official website: www.rakuinoue.com Behance: www.behance.net/rakuinoue Facebook: www.facebook.com/rakuinoue Raku's Sculpture artworkRaku's Sculpture artwork1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks It’s an honor to take part of this interview. Thanks to you guys for thinking of me. So let’s get it started! Before I started using clay as my primary medium, I really didn't have a preference. At that time, my focus was into discovering new things. I was constantly switching between art forms like paintings, pencil art, photography, paper art, digital art and sculpture to name a few. But, in order to make a living, I knew that I had to see myself, to a certain degree, as a product for sell. Earlier Raku's artworkI am not talking about selling your soul to the devil for the fame and glory, but rather finding an identity and promoting it. If someone saw a beautifully wrapped box of milk chocolate next to an more than ordinary nameless one, I am pretty sure that that someone would choose the first box even if what’s inside are exactly the same. I needed that identity but the constant drifting between media made it hard for me to choose one. Until one day, clay found me and we’ve been together ever since. Earlier Raku's artwork2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. My routine consists of: getting up, eating breakfast, taking a shower, and start working. There is no time frame…sometime I get up early sometime not and other time, I don’t sleep at all. The advantage of working as a freelancer is that you have the total control of how to manage your schedule. But the downside would be that it’s easy to lose sight of your personal life so my golden rule is to take at least 2 days off during my week. But more than often I end up working over night after my girlfriend is sleeping. It’s not because I need the money or that I like to overwork, it’s because I LOVE what I do. 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. I love to eat. Anything from gourmet foods to fast foods and I will even accept leftovers. I like to hit the gym as well. Creating is for the mind and the exercise is for the body. You need to take care of both in order to feel total harmony. 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? There are just so many things I want to achieve but developing and directing a music video is on the top of my wish list. I always push myself to do more and this kind of project is certainly a welcomed challenge. I am really into web designing as well. My interest in designing websites is a fairly recent discovery: when I teamed up with one of my good friend Glen Maruska from The Web Tech Guys to program my new website which I designed it myself, I realized how much I loved the process of creation. Again, it is the challenge that gets me into this kind of projects. There are so many things to understand, as many things to implement and capturing the delicate balance between functionalities and the visual become almost addictive. One thing I can say for sure: I will never stop evolving as an artist and as a person because for me, it is the key to longevity. People might get tired my work if I re-do the same thing over and over, but if I keep evolving, they will never feel that way. And if I can help a single person to evolve along my side, then I think I have achieved part of my goal. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. LEAVE YOUR PRIDE AT HOME and be open-minded to comments. There is no such thing as a negative comment if you can learn something from it. LOVE WHAT YOU DO but don't love it to death…nothing should worth that much. BE ORIGINAL! AND BE CREATIVE! don't be a sheep…Its ok to inspire yourself by other’s work but make sure to put your personal touch into it. Have some self-respect. IT’S A SERIOUS BUSINESS. Expect to work hard if you want to succeed. Be organized and be professional, keep in mind that no one wants to hire a newbie. EVOLVE CONSTANTLY. If you are painting the same thing using the same brush over and over, then I recommend you to get out of the cave and search for what else’s out there. If you don't evolve, people might get tired of your work and eventually you will be a thing of the past. At that point you will be forced to re-invent your artistic identity. 6)What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? Obviously the best thing about my work is that I love what I do. Honestly, I don't consider it as work. The worst part is the economic instability that freelancing can cause at times. Save and stash some dollars for the rainy days. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? I really admire the pure-hearted good people who do things even when they’re not obliged to. I, myself, am the kind of person who does things for a reason. Don’t get me wrong; I am not a bad person. If someone needs my help, then I will help out but I will know exactly why I’m helping so pretty much everything I do, has a reason. So I am, in a way, fascinated by those kinds of people who do things just because. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now Tried…but I am feeling really good right now. Many projects on the way, moving into a new house, re-launching my new website, preparing my speech for the upcoming Montreal Meets 3 event which I’m sure you guys heard of from one of your editor, François Hoang and I also have collective projects on the way as well: development of the new website of the “The Web Tech Guys”, launching of the blog-site “Ah-futé!” which should be ready later this summer and some other projects, with my friends from “Tout’nou” creative. I love to work with other creative because the experiences I get out of it are so enriching. This might be a good timing to introduce my creative happening “I Want You For Collabo”. It is a platform where I invite artists to collaborate with me to create a piece of art. You can see what it’s about on my website or you can visite the “I Want You For Collabo” Behance page. 9) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: shoyu ramen (Japanese soy-sauce noodle) - An Animal: -on my plate: duck / in the wilderness: shark - A Color: it depends of how I’m feeling that day but usually aqua blue - A Tool: No, I’m not! - A Person: Morgan Freeman (seriously, who doesn't like Morgan Freeman) - A Place: Hino (my birthplace in Japan) - A Song: I like when birds sing. - A Movie: The Matrix - A Book: Art books…ex: the Art of Avatar, The Art of the Matrix…etc - A Quote: “You turn on the water, the water goes down.”(It’s about making peace with what you cannot change.) 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. For those who create as a hobby, I suggest to you to always follow your heart. Whether you do it to relief stress by taking a break from the normal weekly routine or just for the fun of it, do what you feel like because the feeling you get from what ever you’re doing is what counts. For those who want to make it a living, I suggest to you to strategize the way you approach the business. You MUST find something unique to offer the world. Whether it’s your medium, your subject, your style or your color palette, anything that will separate you from the rest. I will never tell you to sell your soul and go POP but you must see yourself and your work as a product from the moment you want to make ends meet. Be creative, be original and stand up to be somebody. But in both cases, be sure to evolve constantly. Don't be shy to try new medium, new methods and keep searching for a way to out do yourself every time. And I would like to add one last thing, persevere. Don’t expect people to hand you anything. If you want it bad enough, then work hard for it because if you don’t, I will and I just might get it instead.

A little conversation with Gerhard Human

A little conversation with Gerhard Human

We already featured the amazing talent of Gerhard Human on our blog and today we had the opportunity to have a little cconversation with this interesting illustrator. So please take a sit and enjoy the interview, hope you guys get some good tips and insights from this. You can see more of Gerhard Human illustrations at his Official Website. 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks. My first attempt at a music video for my friend's band. I think it was 2003 or somewhere around there. I did all the drawings on paper and scanned them in individually... then painstakingly layered it in photoshop haha. I had some basic after effects skills... which didn't help much! Was a fun project but I had a lot to learn. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. I get up very very early to go to work. I work in Cape Town and stay all the way on the Cape Peninsula, so traveling takes a while. Driving along the beautiful mountain passes more than makes up for it though. I work at Masters & Savant, an animation studio. We do a variety of work, mainly advertising and TV. After work, twice a week I go for a climb or a run (if it's raining) in the mountains. I usually only get to drawing and working on my own projects quite late after my son goes to bed. I don't have a formal studio or work place, so basically just draw where ever I get a space... 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. I never liked the term "hobby", kind of feels like something you do to kill time... I hope I never get to a point where I have to kill time. I do enjoy lots of stuff though; Rock climbing, Downhill mountain biking, mountain climbing and trail running. The best thing about living on the peninsula is being surrounded by mountain reserves. I go exploring by myself at least once a week, running, bouldering or just scouting for new routes to attempt. I also enjoy tending to my bonsai trees and other plants in the garden.  And of course watching films and reading books! 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? I would really love to do more of my person work. I'm working with brushes and ink on large water color paper now, love working on paper again. And I've always loved the finality of putting ink down on paper. There's no room for error and also no room for doubts. I really want to do an exhibition or 2 overseas, I'm searching for some galleries where my work will fit in. Would also like to do more animation projects, character based short stories or a music video... it's important to link up with the right artist though... 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. 1. Very few can relate to what I appreciate 2. Don't ever think you're good enough. There's always more to learn. And someone better than you. 3. Do epic shit. 4. If you can't do something original. Do something AWESOME. 5. Surround yourself with inspiring people. 6)What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? The best: Telling stories and portraying my thoughts. The worst: Having to do commercial work to pay the bills haha 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? Yes, there's lots of people that inspired me along the way: Bob Dylan, Jean Giraud, Katsuhiro Otomo, Philip K Dick, Tom Waits, Frank Zappa, Wes Anderson, Jim Jarmusch, Quentin Tarantino, Thom Yorke, Haruki Murakami... My friend Daan du Plessis inspired me a lot with his amazing comics and wisdom. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now 9) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: My wife makes the most amazing pasta - A Animal: Weazel. They're awesome - A Color: blue - A Tool: Swiss army knife - A Person: My son Edzard, such a rad dude! - A Place: Rocklands, Cederberg, South Africa - A Song: "Gun street girl" by Tom Waits - A Movie: AKIRA by Katsuhiro Otomo - A Book: Man in the high castle by Philip K Dick - A Quote: "He not busy being born is busy dying" - Bob Dylan 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. Everyone experiences it differently. The creative community is growing with the help of the internet, so that's a good thing. It means there's now a larger audience for alternative media. Hopefully the days of relying on gallery curators and TV networks to promote good work is coming to an end :)

A little conversation with Sam Taylor

A little conversation with Sam Taylor

We already featured the stunning talent of Sam Taylor on our blog and today we had the opportunity to have a little cconversation with this peculiar illustrator. So please take a sit and enjoy the interview, hope you guys get some good tips and insights from this. You can see more of Sam Taylor illustrations at his Official Website or at his Tumblr blog, you can also follow him on Twitter. 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honour for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Haha! Thanks. One of the first proper jobs I did was for Death Skateboards, it was a board graphic for my friend who (coincidentally) is a professional for them, Boots. Then I did another graphic for Science Skateboards, a company that my good friend (Chris Morgan) owns and I skate for. From there I got more and more work, until I did something for VICE and that became a regular thing. Sam Taylor version of Jim Phillips "Screaming Hand" 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. I wake up at about 9am, get a coffee, put on BBC 6 Music, sort myself out and then start drawing. If I already have a brief I like to get drawing straight away. After I’ve done all the drawing I scan everything in, then maybe I’ll get some food, after I’ve eaten I get on Photoshop and make it all look really pretty. When I’m finished with that I’ll go skate or bowling or something fun, then go to the pub. Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. Skateboarding and bowling are my main hobbies. I’ve been skating for about 13 years, I love it. And I recently got into bowling with a few of my good friends, it started out as a joke but now we go every week and are all completely hooked. I love beer as well and that ties in nicely with my bowling addiction. What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? Wow, I don’t know. I’m pretty happy where I am right now. Maybe I’ll get into animation or do more comics, we’ll see. Hopefully I’ll be better at bowling in 5 years. Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. 1- Aim for the pocket, so you can get a strike. 2- Draw every day, so you can grow rad images. 3- Eat your 5-a-day, so you don’t die. 4- Listen to the radio, so you know what’s going on in the world. 5- Never say no to fun. What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? The best thing is getting to draw every day, I love it. Picking my own hours is good too, I’m pretty well organised. The worst is probably cabin fever, being stuck at my desk for long periods of time, alone, it’s not that bad but it kinda sucks. I like people. Oh and waiting for briefs to come in. Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? My heroes are pretty obvious; like Robert Crumb, Matt Groening, John K, Danny Devito, Larry David, Daniel Clowes, Mark Rothko, Bill Hicks, Nick Cave, Monty, Prince Naseem Hamed the list goes on. Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now. Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: Chilli - A Animal: The Common Street Fox - A Colour: Black - A Tool: Computer - A Person: Myself - A Place: London - A Song: ‘Golden Slumbers’ A Movie: Die Hard With A Vengeance - A Quote: As Slipknot so eloquently put it: “People = Shit” Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. Don’t stop drawing, learn as much software as you can, be on all the different social media sites and always have fun. (Also follow me on Twitter, thanks).

A Little Conversation With Mister Frivolous

A Little Conversation With Mister Frivolous

A Little Conversation With Mister Frivolous We already featured the stunning talent of Mr. Frivolous on our blog and today we had the opportunity to have a little chat with this misterious artist. Besides all technical aspects on his work, making miracles with simple marker pens and pencils, we're hungry for more ideas and information about him and so we bring this funny and cool conversation to you guys. You can check more from Mr. Frivolous at his Official Website. 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking about how was the beginning of your career? Please show us one of your early artworks (please send us the picture). No problem. Thanks for asking me. When I first started I didn't really know what I was doing and didn't have a 'Frivolous' style . I was just mixing all types of creative mediums which also included graphic design. As well as being frustrated and very anxious when I first started out (not much has changed) it was also a lot more fun. I think you can get away with experimenting when you haven't yet developed a style. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine. I don't really have a photo of my workspace so hopefully this image will do instead. My daily routine: Wake up, Think, brush teeth, jump on net, Facebook, emails, think about life, Tumblr, Facebook, research images, think about life, Facebook, Facebook for another 7 hours and then sometimes I find time to draw. 3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. I cant really think of any other hobby but drawing. If you count going out and boogying on the dance floor like a fool as a hobby then I suppose that would be it. I used to really like reading comic books and have a huge collection at home. And fashion magazines too! 4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years? The next 5 years? Wow. I haven't really thought that far ahead. Maybe the next step would be to start using different mediums instead of just marker pens. Some of my friends keep telling me to do t-shirts. Who knows. Maybe I'll get into that. Or maybe I should find me a Mrs. Frivolous and get married... 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point. 1- Dont try and argue with an angry woman. Just run. 2- Mixing milk with orange juice is a stupid idea. 3- Being beautiful can never disguise an ugly fart. 4- If you really want to make progress, then go for it and don't wait for anybody. 5- Your mind is a very powerful tool. So if believe that your not good enough, then you won't be. 6)What's the best thing about working on your business and what is the worst? Why? The best thing is that there is no boss telling me what to do and I can draw when I feel like it. The worst is that I am very easily distracted and some times a little lazy. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? (please send us pics just in case they're not popular) The first people that poped into my head were Eddie Murphy and Bill Cosby so I think I will go with those two for now. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now (please send us the picture). Confused. 9) Now for some quick and short answers: - A Food: Rice - A Animal: Cat - A Color: Black - A Tool: Pen? - A Person: Natalie Portman - A Place: New York - A Song: Smashing Pumpkings "1979" - A Movie: Coming To America - A Book: Choose Your Own Adventure - A Quote: "After Hardship Comes Ease" 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect. I would say to just do what you really love doing. Dont try to please anyone else by pursuing something you know you dont really have an interest in . And also be very patient and persistent.

A little conversation with Christopher Lee

A Little Conversation with Christopher Lee

A little conversation with Christopher LeeSome weeks ago, we featured some projects from Christopher Lee on our blog. I got really hooked on his style and ideas, so I decided to invite him to make this interview. Chris was kind enough to accept this new model of interview that the ABDZ team is proposing, we decided to focus more on the person on less on the professional, hope you dig it.Just in case you haven't seen Chris work, please take a look on the post we did about him and at his Official Website.  1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about how was the beginning of your career?I started working in the graphic design industry when I was 18. I got my first internship at a small non-profit design company in Sacramento where I did everything from brochure layouts to simple spot illustrations for local businesses. They weren't great (they were horrible in retrospect), but it's where I began. The "portfolio" I had at the time consisted of a bunch of random Photoshop projects I had done in my senior year of high school but it was enough for them to see my potential. They definitely took a gamble on me. That internship turned into a job and I ended up staying at that company for five years. The jobs weren't glamorous, but during my stay, I learned all the skills that I needed to move on to the next chapter of my career. 2) Please share a picture of your workplace and tells us more about your daily routine.I work from home so my schedule is extremely flexible. I don't really have a daily routine. I usually work most of the day (and into the evening when I'm working on larger projects) and I take breaks to run errands and take care of our dog. As long as I get my work done, then my day-to-day business doesn't really matter too much.Chris's workplace.3) Beside your daily work, do you have any hobbies? Please share it with us. (Send us a picture of you while doing your hobby).When I find the time, I like painting miniatures from Warhammer 40k as well as building/painting Gundam models.  I also enjoy playing air soft.  4) What you think are the next steps for you as a professional and as a person? And how do you see your creative area on the next 5 years?I think I'm already on the right path. I always want to try new things and introduce new techniques into my work. I'm never satisfied with one particular style. That said, I'm not sure what my work will look like next year or in ten years. That's the exciting part for me.In the next five years I hope to be more involved with the design community and maybe do some teaching via online tutorials or guest speaking at local colleges. I would like to give back in some form. 5) Please share five golden lessons you learned to this point.1) You don't get better by doing work at "work". You get better when you experiment and work on your own projects on the side.2) Always charge what your time is worth.3) Never work for free or for favors.4) In the beginning, no job is a small or inconsequential. They are all stepping stones to learn and move forward from.5) Always love what you do. 6)What's the best thing about working on you business and what is the worst? Why?The best thing may be the flexibility in my hours and that I am my own boss. My output is directly related to the effort I put in. That itself is a great motivator. Knowing my livelihood is dependent on how hard I work is very humbling and it always keeps the drive to do new things high. I also get to work and collaborate with some extremely talented people and creative minds. There is always something to learn.The worst thing is probably thinking about the future. With design, you always have to fight to stay relevant. Which is one reason why I never want to stop evolving. There are a thousand people out there competing in the same industry for the same types of jobs and it's up to me to stick out enough to keep those jobs coming in. 7) Do you have any heroes? What make them your heroes? (please send us pics just in case they're not popular persons)It might be weird, but I honestly don't have any personal heroes. 8) Tell us in one picture how you're feeling about your life right now (please send us the picture). 9) Now for some quick and short answers:- Food: Spicy tuna on crispy rice.- Animal: Boston Terrier. We have one so I'm biased :)- Color: I'm a big fan of coral/salmon type reds right now.- Tool: In the office, my Wacom Cintiq. In the garage, my Ryobi impact driver haha.- Person: My girlfriend- Place: Kyoto, Japan- Song: "Dakota" by the Stereophonics- Movie: Aliens- Book: The Art of Pixar's Monsters, Inc- Quote: "Draw to live. Live to Draw" - Invisible Creature 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business, tell us something we should expect.Take the initiative to really find your individual voice in this industry and never lose the love for what you're doing. Being successful in the design/illustration field is a combination of raw talent and a little luck so expect to pay your dues early on, work hard, and know that you may not land your dream client right away.

 Interview with Jason Levesque (Stuntkid)

Interview with Jason Levesque (Stuntkid)

I remember when I decided to work on the creative business 5 years ago, one of my first references as master in their craft was definetely Jason Levesque a.k.a. Stuntkid. 5 years after I finally had the opportunity to interview one of my idols and, in my opinion, one of the best illustrators out there at this moment.You can see more of this stunning artist at his Official Website. 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honor for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for illustration and art?I've always been interested in art. I think that is likely true for everyone. We understand drawings long before we understand the written word. As children, we all draw. A 5 year old with a story to tell can illustrate a situation with more detail than that child can write it out. At some point a lot of kids stop drawing, either from disinterest or disappointment in how slowly the skill is developing. I wasn't great at drawing as a child, but i really enjoyed it. I was also lucky enough to grow up in a family that encouraged me not only with praise, but with encouragement to improve. 2) Which artists do you use for reference?I'm inspired by so many artists, a few off the top of my head... Ashley Wood, Joao Ruas. Erik Jones, Conrad Roset, Tom Bagshaw, and more classic artists like Ernst Haeckel. 3) Your style is quite influenced by comics and art nouveau. How did you develop this style and how would you describe it?I feel like i've gone through so many phases over the years. My interests and influences have drifted so wildly, i feel like it's difficult now to describe the path i took to get here. Influences like Akira, my earliest influence and later artists like Mucha and Klimt have remained with me. I don't know if i can describe my work now in stylistic terms. I'm sure someone else can, likely with ease. I'm too close, haha. 4) Describe us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece.It's not often i'll sit and think of what to draw. Usually the ideas come to me randomly or in bed as i'm falling asleep. I read a lot of science books and find a lot of inspiration in learning new things, biological and otherwise. Once I have an idea, i'll go through my thousands of reference photos i've shot and look for a good pose match. Sometimes i'll have to shoot something new. Referencing the photo i'll sketch out a rough composition on paper or, more often, in photoshop. With a little refinement i'll start coloring using the pen tool. Finished pieces usually take me somewhere between a few hours an a few days depending on the level of detail. 5)What's the best thing about working with illustration and what is the worst?I love doing commercial illustration. I make more money with less work when i do commission work. The constraints of the project often push me to learn new things, or draw subject matter i'm unfamiliar with. It can be a huge learning experience. Quite often the work will get lost in committee with too many voices making creative decisions. When that happens I find myself detaching from the work and setting my goals to just doing the best i can do in the amount of time given. Commercial work is simultaneously the best and worst part of illustrating. 6) How do you describe your daily routine?Art, art, art, eat, art, art, talk about art with wife, art, eat, sleep and dream about art. 7) Which is your favorite piece so far?Currently "Hecate" which also happens to be my newest piece, is my favorite. It felt like a stepping stone for me and i intend on doing more work like it. A limited edition print will be release early October through 1xRun. 8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important for every illustrator.1.) You'll only get better by practice. It takes thousands of hours to hone a skill, drawing is no different. If you don't know what to draw, draw anything. Keep your pencil moving!2.) Embrace criticism. What people say to your face, they say more often behind your back. Recognize the difference between quality criticism and the venom of hateful people. If someone isn't suggesting an improvement, disregard their feedback. They are the background noise time will forget.3.) You'll never "arrive" creating art is a journey. You'll make slow progress, sometimes you'll make quick progress, you'll never "get there". Get over it. There will always be less deserving people ahead of you and more deserving people behind you.4.) Encourage other people, as you get better don't forget how painfully discouraging your early art years were. Keep your eye out for people who are still there and advise and encourage them whenever possible.5.) Try not to get so married to a process that you keep yourself from growing. Illustrators and fine artists need a recognizable product, but too many artists literally paint themselves into a corner and never progress. 9) Tell us some websites that you like to visit.To be honest, i'm on tumblr quite a bit. I follow most of my favorite artists there and have discovered many new artists through "tumbling". Instagram, of course, is growing in popularity and a lot of artists are now using it to post their works in progress. The now defunct CGunit.net was a daily visit for me for years. It still holds archives of amazing artists. Oh! And in their last days they did a countdown of their favortie artists and gave me the 6th position. I was hugely flattered. 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for the ones who are starting out on this kind of business.Bad situations are usually the best learning experiences and if you're lucky you'll have lots of them!