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Underwater Paintings by Matt Story

Underwater Paintings by Matt Story

Matt Story Contemporary American Realist Oil Painter specialized in underwater scenes. We selected some of his amazing work to display here, these canvas are huge and have such a realistic feeling. Enjoy! For more from Matt Story visit .mattstory.com.

Magical Half-Underwater Photography

Magical Half-Underwater Photography

You know you got an state-of-the-art piece when you get to capture the best of underwater and surface worlds. I find completely spectacular half-underwater photographies that capture scenes of either quietude or amazing events. So I've selected some superb examples of that. These are the work of some truly talented people, and you should really check their portfolios out simply by clicking each image. They'll definitely enjoy your visit. Also, if you got your own half-underwater pieces, share it with us! We'd love to see it. Cheers! ;) Islands in the Stream by Michael Anderson "Aqua Dive" by Sean Davey The Hug. by Felix Hernandez Rodriguez Paradise island? Look below! by Andrey Narchuk Zamami island locals by Pete Leong tahitian beauty by richard kohler The Game by Vitaliy Sokol Island by Marcus Pauli Magic Moments III by Felix Hernandez Rodriguez paradise? by Sarah Lee Under the wave by Mathieu RIVRIN On the boat and under by Andrey Narchuk On the boat and under by Andrey Narchuk Punchbowl Blue by Lijah Hanley Antarctic Underwater Iceberg by Kyle Marquardt Half-Half by uwafot | Oskar Schad struggle of Corals by Alex Solich Coral reef and the Island by Novikov Sergey Mermaid by Romi Burianova Corals, clownfish and palm island - half underwater shoot. Thail by Roman Barelko Untitled by Roberto Muñoz | Pindaro

Amazing Underwater Photography

Amazing Underwater Photography

I love the sea world and I'm a big fan of underwater photography, so I decided to hand pick some amazing photographies that show this underwater world that we not so used to, enjoy the inspiration. If you like to know more info about the photo (camera used, location, ...) or more info on the photographer, please click on the photo you like to find out more about it. Go diving? by Andrey Narchuk Tiger shark by alex dawson hunter and the hunted by Alexander Safonov FreePlay by Hengki Koentjoro the sardine run by Alexander Safonov the blue rush by Alexander Safonov nitrogen trip by Alexander Safonov Triger Fish by Hengki Koentjoro Island by Marcus Pauli Lady Of The Deep by Jacques de Vos storm clouds by Sarah Lee First UW shot with my DSLR by Ellen Cuylaerts Diver immersed in silversides by Ellen Cuylaerts Left Moscow passage by Viktor Lyagushkin

Stavronikita: A Underwater Design Project

Stavronikita: A Underwater Design Project

We've seen some pretty unique art exhibitions here at Abduzeedo, like underwater sculptures, for one. But I would never guess I'd see a exhibition of images underwater. Great idea, great design. The "Stavronikita Project: The Life Above Refined Below" is super awesome exhibit done by the Staudinger Franke studio from Vienna. It consists in underwater pictures of the sunken Stavronikita, with a little spice: the nobles of the eighteenth century. The SS Stavronikita lies at the bottom of the ocean at 13.8 N, 59.38 W, right off the Caribbean island of Barbados. It is the spot Andreas Franke has discovered and chosen to stage a game full of overflowing decadence and exuberance. Three young ladies court gossip during a lavish picnic, accompanied by eminently trimmed and trained poodles. A woman in a blue dress obliviously indulges in a piece of cake, surrounded by an extravagant amount of overelaborate pastries and confectionaries. It is a typical image of Rococo: disgraceful, self-indulgent and immoderate. Andreas Franke presents you with one of the most flashing and flamboyant epochs of European style and cultural history in the midst of a scenery, in which nature displays all of its own abundance and prodigality. A great vision and execution by these guys. For more of their work, please visit their portfolio at Behance. Cheers! ;) Underwater exhibition on SS Stavronikita / Barbados

The Underwater Project by Mark Tipple

The Underwater Project by Mark Tipple

It's summer in the southern hemisphere, and in some places, like my city (Porto Alegre), it's been the hottest december of the past 12 years. Right now, it's almost 40ºC, I'm melting and all I wanted was to be in the ocean, getting underwater, beneath the waves. Like these guys in the Underwater Project. These is pure awesome. For me this is one of the most fun things to do at the beach, and it was captured in great style by Mark Tipple in the these amazing photographs. These are some great pictures, but if you visit his portfolio at Behance you'll get to see some amazing videos! Go check it out. Merry Christmas, everyone! Cheers. ;)

Amazing Jellyfish Photography by Alexander Semenov

Amazing Jellyfish Photography by Alexander Semenov

Alexander Semenov is photographer and professional diver from Russia, he's also the chief of scientific diving team at White Sea Biological Station. His underwater photography are just absolutely stunning, everything feels so surreal and in his own words…magic. And the most important thing — I love Sea. For more information about Alexander Semenov and his many works, you can visit his website at Clione.ru. All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov All Rights to Alexander Semenov

Amazingly Detailed Underwater Photography

Amazingly Detailed Underwater Photography

Some people might find scientific research boring, but I guarantee that this is very important for our own development as a society. And of course, it can be surprisingly beautiful! And, you can help scientists with your donations.These are some photographs taken by the scientific divers team at the White Sea Biological Station of Lomonosov’s Moscow State University, Russia. These show us the fauna and flora of those waters in amazing detail. And you could help them keep the research during the year by donating funds for a new barn! You can check more photos here and information about this project at indiegogo. If you got the time and money to help these guys, please, do it! Cheers. ;)

Dreamlike Underwater Sculptures by Jason Taylor

Last week we had a nice post about underwater scenes, and I had the opportunity to find another great underwater related subject: sculptures! And the cool thing is that these are not from an ancient civilization, but quite modern. Jason de Caires Taylor creates these amazing sculptures in land, and then places them underwater. This is a great thing because coral reefs are dying and these help a lot. Here's some information about it: Over the past few decades, we have lost over 40% of our natural coral reefs. Scientists predict a permanent demise of 80% by 2050. Jason de Caires Taylor's art is an example of generative human intervention in the ecosystem, showing what can be accomplished by individual imagination and collective effort. Taylor's strategy of conserving reefs, opposes the "land as commodity" mentality of Capitalism. His creation of underwater sculpture parks attracts tourists away from natural reefs, allowing them to recover, and taps into tourism revenue, showing how activists might be able to use the system's rapacious tendencies against itself. His exceptional works are designed "to promote the regeneration of marine life and to use sculpture as a means of conveying hope and awareness of the plight of our oceans" before it is too late. Also, his sculptures change over time with the effects of their environment. As time passes and these pieces develop biological growth, they redefine the underwater landscape. A super experience for scuba-divers and underwater life. For more of Jason's sculptures please visit his website. It's really worth it. Cheers! ;) The Phoenix The Listener The Last Supper Vicissitudes The Holy Man The Holy Man The Holy Man The Musician Time Bomb Banker Man on Fire Dream Collector The Lost Correspondent Inheritance

Magnificent Underwater Photography

I'm terrified of places where I might get vulnerable and exposed to its dangers. My best guess is that underwater I might get devoured by a giant shark or dragged to the bottom of ocean by something with tentacles. But seeing these underwater pictures make my thoughts get lighter and even merrier. These are some magnificent photographs by some really talented photographers that took the time to take them in situations I probably will never place myself in. And that's the beauty of photography... it lets you visit worlds you might never get to know and still enjoy it. These are amazing and you should really check each photographer's portfolio for more, simply by clicking each image. I hope you enjoy these! Cheers. ;) Jacques de Vos Ellen Cuylaerts Ellen Cuylaerts Ellen Cuylaerts Jody MacDonald roblfc 1892 Robert White Vitaly Sokol Vitaly Sokol Viktor Lyagushkin Viktor Lyagushkin Hengki Koentjoro Alex Dawson Romeo Penacino

Funny Underwater Dogs by Seth Casteel

Underwater Dogs is a funny series of photographs by Seth Casteel. Based in Los Angeles, Seth delivers spontaneous and priceless results to capture our favourite pets in images that will surely last forever. Some of them are really funny and some a bit scary, you'll be the judge! For more information about the Seth Casteel, you can visit LittleFriendsPhoto.com and follow him on Twitter @LTLFriendsPhoto.

Underwater Photography by Elena Kalis

Being underwater is such a limitless and free experience. The silence and emptiness of your surrounding becomes your own little space. Russian Photographer Elena Kalis is known for creating this effect within her photography. Now based in the Bahamas, Elena is pursuing her captivating passion by exploring the underwater and taking awe-inspiring pictures for the viewing pleasure of our eyes. You can check more work of Elena Kalis on her website at ElenaKalisPhoto.com . Underwater Carousel from Elena Kalis on Vimeo.

Surf & Underwater Photography by Sarah Lee

Sarah Lee is from Kona on the big island of Hawaii, and she has taken some of the most amazing photos I've ever seen. Underwater shots are simply awesome and the surf action is just as good. Seeing this shots on these amazing beaches will definitely make you wish you were there. Enjoy! To find out more about Sarah Lee visit her website www.vivantvie.com, her flickr, twitter, and facebook.

Old to Young Case Study in Photoshop by Cassio Braga

Reading the comments about the Photoshop Battle and I noticed the a lot of people were interested in knowing and seeing the images that were created during the event. Because of that I decided to recreate one of the images I did in my first battle, which was my favorite. This time however I had more time to pay attention to some details, in the event we had only 30 minutes to come up with an idea and make it come true. So as I mentioned before this image, I will present in this case study, was created in my first duel and the subject was water. I really like the result because besides the visual strength it has a simple idea that makes us wonder and think about life and aging. Video of the Photoshop Battle Abduzeedo - Battle of Photoshop from Alexandre Guterres on Vimeo. For the whole composition I used 6 other images as you can see in the case study that follows now. Step 1 The first image I selected was a photo of a little girl that we have taken last year in the end of a photo session back in the studio where I work, StudioMe. I chose this image because I really like the expression on her face, she is only 7 years old but was very comfortable in front of the camera. Right after this I placed the girl’s photo in my composition I selected a photo of an old lady that was taken again in another photo session at StudioMe. Step 2 Incredibly the two images matched pretty well one I put one over the other, so all I have to do was to create a good transition between the two faces right below the nose line. This transition was done simply by putting the image of the girl in a layer beneath the old lady layer in which I added a layer mask and hid the layer. Then with a very soft brush I started to make some areas visible, but very smoothly and natural. In order to make the transition very realistic I made some adjustments using the Liquify filter to move the nose a little bit down on the face of the girl. After that I did a color adjustment to make the hue of the skin of both photos match. To do that I used some Adjustment Layers such as Curves and Vibrance. Step 3 The next step I started to create the mood for the composition, sort of like how I would like to perceive the idea behind the composition. To do that I created a selection to separate the top from the bottom part. For the top part I created this sort of vignette effect to driver the user attention to the face, like the focal point. For the bottom part, I just did some color adjustments to make sure that the girl really looked as if she was underwater. Step 4 To make the scene more realistic, specially the underwater part, it was necessary to add some light effects. So in this part of the process I looked for an image to create the caustics effect. In optics, a caustic or caustic network is the envelope of light rays reflected or refracted by a curved surface or object, or the projection of that envelope of rays on another surface. The caustic is a curve or surface to which each of the light rays is tangent, defining a boundary of an envelope of rays as a curve of concentrated light. Therefore in the image to the right, the caustics can be the patches of light or their bright edges. These shapes often have cusp singularities. To add some depth I applied a blur to the caustic effect and I also added some blurry air bubbles. Still I thought the image needed even more depth. So I added a layer and applied a render clouds and after that used the Gaussian Blur to make it super blurry, enough to give the idea that the background wasn’t empty. Now for the underwater part I created a sort of inverted the illumination. To do that I used a Curves Adjustment Layer in which I pulled all the channels up increasing the brightness of the image. I also Inverted the mask to hide this adjustment and then with a very soft brush I started make the layer visible, that way the transition would be much more smooth. Step 5 The bubbles in the water made the difference in terms of realism. This part took me more time because I had to do some testing. To make the effect as realistic as possible the bubbles needed to reflect the rest of the image, but a little bit darker. However I didn’t like the result of none of the images I was testing, only after quite a lot of time I found the image I was looking for, with some subtle air bubbles. Even though the image might not be the most coherent in terms of photography and with the composition, in my humble opinion they were the ones that created the best effect. Those little bubbles really give this ideas that they are making the aging process turning the old lady into a child. Technically speaking, the bubble layers were a layer with a very light background with the bubbles, so I simply inverted it and change the Blend Mode to Screen. In case you don’t know, the Scree mode hides all black pixels of the layer. Still in this step I selected the lenses of the glasses of the old lady layer and then applied a blueish gradient as if it was reflecting the water. The gradient layer was created on top of the old lady layer and then I applied the Soft Light Blend Mode. Step 6 Here the process was almost done, just some fine tunes and little tweaks. I added some bright spots on the water surface, change the color of the old lady eyes to a more blueish tone and applied a Smart Sharpen only in the top part, that way the two parts would match a little better. The last thing I did here was to apply a Photo Filter Adjustment Layer with blue with 10% of Transparency on top all the other layers. That way all layers would sort of get better blended together. Step 7 The whole process to create this image took me like 10 hours, however a good amount of this time was just testing different images trying to find the best ones. I hope you like this case study and that it may help you. Feedback is always appreciated, so feel free to share your opinion with comments and tweets. About the Author Cassio Braga is an art director and digital artist from Candelária, RS, but currently based in Porto Alegre. He is graduated in advertising from ESPM and have already worked for some big Porto Alegre agencies such as Escala and DCS. Currently working at StudioMe.

Underwater Scene in Pixelmator

In this tutorial, I will show you how to create an underwater scene as inspired by the opening titles of I, Robot, the movie. We will create a brush that will be used to add the bubbles and explore a technique to make your scenes look more realistic. The whole process is quite simple, and it takes less than 1 hour to go through all the steps. Step 1 Open Pixelmator and create a new document, the one I’m using is 1440×900 pixels. After that, fill the background layer with black.? Step 2 Add a new layer and fill it with a dark green (#12241f). Step 3 Go to Layer>Add Layer Mask. After that, select the thumb of the mask in the Layer Palette and go to Filter>Generator>Clouds. Use black and white for the colors and apply the clouds on the layer mask.? Step 4 With the layer mask still selected, go to Filter>Blur>Zoom Blur. Move the controller point to the bottom center of the image and use 60 for the amount. This will create a really nice effect. Step 5 Add another layer and then with the Brush Tool (B) select a red/pink color (#941433). Then, paint a large spot in the bottom and center of the design like I did in the image below.? Step 6 Repeat steps 3 and 4 and then apply the render filter to the mask and the zoom blur, respectively. Step 7 Add a new layer on top of the others and fill it in with black. Change the Blending to Color Dodge, and then with the Brush Tool (B) and a soft brush with white, paint a little white spot at the bottom and center of the design. Then, repeat the previous step for the mask.? Step 8 Reduce the opacity to 80% if your light effect gets too bright. Step 9 Add another layer, then, using the Brush Tool (B) again, select a large soft brush and dark blue to paint some blue spots right on and above the red/pink light. This blue layer has to be very subtle; I used the brush with 25% only. After that, you can apply the Zoom Blur again with the same amount as we did in the previous steps, 60. Step 10 To create the bubbles, I used a stock photo courtesy of Shutterstock. You can find it at http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-31147426/stock-photo-beautiful-abstract-background-of-soap-bubbles-on-black.html. I used the guides for reference and then with the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M), change the option to Ellipse and select the bubble you want to use for your brush. Copy and paste it to a new layer, and then go to Image > Desaturate, then Image > Invert.? Step 11 Creating the brush is pretty simple; just drag the layer from the Layer Palette to the Brushes Palette. Pixelmator will automatically create the new brush. Double click on it to edit, and then change the Spacing to 200% and the Scatter to 65%. Over the Shape Jitter options, change the Size to 100% and the stroke to 7%.? Step 12 Add a new layer and fill it with black using the Paint Bucket Tool (N). Change the Blending to Color Dodge. Select the Brush Tool (B) and the brush you created in the previous step. Paint some bubbles onto your design using white.? Step 13 Select the Blur Tool (R) and a big soft brush. Start making some bubbles blurrier than the others to add some depth to your design.? Step 14 Add another layer on top of the others, and using the Paint Bucket Tool (N), fill it with black. Change the Blending to Color Dodge, and then use the Brush Tool (B) and the bubble brush we created to paint some big bubbles, much larger than the previous one. I used 700 for the brush size this time and 300 for the previous one.? Step 15 Now, import another photo to add more realism to the composition. I’m using another image from Shutterstock, which you can find here at http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-24003511/stock-photo-water-splashing-forming-air-bubbles-over-a-black-background.html.? Step 16 With the image in your document, first, go to Image > Desaturate, and then change the Blending to Color Dodge. You will also have to resize and position the image to how you want it. I flipped the image I used vertically.? Step 17 Select all layers and duplicate them. Merge all duplicated layers and go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Use 20 for the blur amount.? Step 18 Change the Blending to Screen and the Opacity to 50%.? Step 19 Duplicate the blurry layer and then change the Blending to Overlay, while keeping the Opacity at 50%.? Conclusion Now, just add your logo and the scene is practically done. If you want, you can add another layer on top and fill it with the Stripes filter. Then, rotate it to get some horizontal lines to simulate those scan lines from old TVs, but that is another story for another tutorial. Download the Pixelmator File Click here to download the Pixelmator file used for this tutorial

Simple Underwater Scene in Photoshop

A few weeks ago I received an email from a reader asking me if I could write a tutorial showing an underwater scene. I have written some tutorials on this subject like the 3D type made out of water or the underwater scene for Digital Arts in 2008. However I was watching TV this weekend when I started to watch I, Robot. The opening titles of that movie is awesome and really inspired me to write this tutorial. In this tutorial I will show you how to create a underwater scene with some bubbles and light effects. We will use the Brush Tool to create the bubbles and basic tools and filters for the rest of the effects. The whole process won't take more than 45 minutes and as usual you can download the Photoshop file in the end of the tutorial. Step 1 Open Photoshop and create a new document, I'm using 2560x1440 pixels so I can use it as wallpaper. After that fill the background layer with black. Step 2 Add another layer and fill it with green (234b44) Step 3 With the green layer selected go to Layer>Group Layer. The layer will be inside a folder in the Layer Palette. Select this folder and go to Layer>Layer Mask>Hide All. Select the Brush Tool (B) and, with a big soft brush, paint with white over the areas you want to be shown, Step 4 Select the green layer now and go to Layer>Layer Mask>Reveal All. Over the layer palette, select the mask of the layer and go to Filter>Render>Clouds. You will apply the clouds into the mask. After that, still with the mask selected, go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur. Use a big value, I used 80px for the Radius but this value will vary depending on the size of your document. Step 5 Add another layer on top of the others and with the Brush Tool (B) and a very soft brush, paint a red spot light like I did in the image below. Change the Opacity of this layer to 65% as well. Step 6 Add another layer on top of the others and then again with the Brush Tool (B) and the big brush you used before, select now a dark blue and paint some areas above the red. This blue has to be very subtle, so change the Opacity to 20-30%. Step 7 Add another layer and then select the Gradient Tool (G). Click on the gradient colors to open the Gradient Editor, then change the Type to Noise, the Roughness to 100% and select both Options: Restrict Colors and Add Transparency. Fill the layer with the gradient and then go to Image>Adjustments>Desaturate. After that go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur. I used 30 pixels for the Radius, but once again this value will change depending on the size of your document. Step 8 Just change the Blend Mode of the layer with the noise gradient to Color Dodge. Step 9 For the bubbles I created a brush using a photo for reference. The photo I used was courtesy of Shutterstock and you can download it here. You can also download the brush I created here. Add a new layer and then select the Brush Tool (B) and then using a big size, I used 400 pixels, paint some bubbles using white for the color. Group this layer (Layer>Group Layers) and change the Blend Mode of the Folder to Color Dodge. Step 10 Select the layer with the bubbles and go to Filter>Convert for Smart Filters. Then go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Bur. Use 7 pixels for the Radius. The whole layer will get blurry, but notice that there is a sub layer with a white thumb called Smart Filters. Select the Brush Tool (B), with black for the color and start painting over the bubbles you don't want them to be blurry. It's like a maks for the smart filters. Step 11 Import your logo and go to Layer>Layer Styles>Blending Options. Change the Fill to 0, then select Inner Glow. Use Color Dodge for the Color, 50% for the Opacity and change the Size to 15pixels. After that select Bevel and Emboss. Use Inner Bevel for the Style, 90% for the Depth, Down for the Direction, 1 pixel for the Size, 5 pixels for the Soften. For the Shading options use 70º for the Ange and 16º for the Altitude. For the Highlight and Shadow Modes use Color Dodge with white for the colors and 100% Opacity. Step 12 Add another layer, you can add it inside the folder of the other layer with Bubbles, the one we created in the step 9. With the Brush Tool (B) and the bubble brush, this time with a much smaller size, paint some bubbles over the A, B, Ds and O like the word would be disintegrating into bubbles. Step 13 Select the text layer and go to Layer>Layer Mask>Reveal All. With the Brush Tool (B) and soft brush with black paint over the areas that the text would be disintegrating into bubbles (1-6) Step 14 Select the bubbles layer the one that is over the text and the repeat the same technique we did on the Step 10 to make some parts of the layer blurrier than other areas. Step 15 Add a layer on top of the others and go to Filter>Render>Clouds. Make sure you had black and white for the background and foreground colors. After that go to Filter>Render>Difference Clouds. The layer will be very dark, so go to Image>Adjustments>Invert, then go to Image>Adjustment>Levels. Increase the white input until you have an image like the one below. Step 16 Change the Blend Mode to Color Dodge and go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur. Use 20 pixels for the Radius. You can also reduce the Opacity to 60%. Step 17 To give more realism to the composition you can add some real bubbles, here I'm using a photo that is courtesy of Shutterstock and you can find it here. As you can see the photo has black background, in this case, change the Blend Mode to Color Dodge so the black becomes transparent. Step 18 Once again you can convert the layer with the stock photo of bubbles to smart objects and then apply Gaussian Blur and paint of the areas you want to keep them without blur like we did on the Step 10. Step 19 Add a layer on top of the others and then select the Paint Bucket Tool (G). Change the type to Pattern, then select the stripes pattern that I have created, you can download it here. Fill the layer with the pattern and go to Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur. Use 2 pixels for the Radius, then change the Blend Mode to Overlay and the Opacity to 50%. Conclusion The idea of this tutorial was to show you how to create a sort of underwater scene using basic tools like brushes and gradients combined with simple filters like blur and clouds. The whole process is pretty simple and you can now create some really nice wallpapers as well. Click on the image for full preview. Another Example Download the Photoshop File Click here to download the Photoshop files used for this tutorial

Amazing Underwater Portraits

Ok, this one I didn't expect: yesterday, during my daily walkthrough various sites, I ran into something that I never paid any attention: underwater portraits. These are truly amazing and you should check them out. Underwater photography in general is very interesting. It's somewhat misterious, since it is set somewhere no humans live in. There's really not much to talk about, all we have to do is to look at these and imagine. They are really amazing. And by any chance, does any of you got underwater pictures, portraits, or whatever? If you do, share it with us! We'd love to see some more. Hope you like these... cheers! ;) javiy Georgia Wiggs Radio_138 Preckie RN Rhea Q p_j_laney Elena Kalis

Stunning Underwater Fashion Photography

Continuing my research about photography and its different formats I found some pretty nice underwater fashion photos that I would like to share here. I really like this technique because it shows the photographers talent and also the model capacity of standing still to provide the best close to the image. My modeling experience is nonexistent, but I believe that taking a photo underwater must be a hard task. :) Please check out further images, making of videos and techniques details at Mick Gleissner website (http://www.mgleiss.com). You can also find several other photos, information and curiosity about this way of photographing at the following websites I've used to find some of these great work. So, check them out: http://www.candice.co.uk http://underwaterphoto.multiply.com/ http://www.frazierproductions.com/ http://www.lars-kirchhoff.de/go/journal/underwater_photographers/ As Mick Gleissner mention at his website: " Combine one man's passion for diving and photography with his fascination for fashion and beautiful women..." and you will have great underwater fashion photography.